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  1. I'm curious but was anyone here born with mental problems that function fine now without "Medications"? Meaning as young as you can remember? I ask because I had a lot of anxiety growing up as a child, mostly separation anxiety from my parents but I was never medicated. As I grew older I started to out grow it until one of my parents died in front of me when I was 15 which led me down this path, so really I am just curious. I almost feel like I got trapped and there is no way out. The withdrawal from this Anafranil is horrible, I just don't know if I got trapped on the Klonopin and might just have to remain on it because I am barely holding on as it is and I can't imagine having something but I remember before the trauma I wasn't on anything, you know?
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25470092# J Clin Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;75(11):e1278-83. doi: 10.4088/JCP.14m09046. Correlates of incident bipolar disorder in children and adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivitydisorder. Jerrell JM1, McIntyre RS, Park YM. Author information AbstractBACKGROUND:The greater severity and chronicity of illness in youths with co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder deserve further investigation as to the risk imparted by comorbid conditions and the pharmacotherapies employed. METHOD:A retrospective cohort design was employed, using South Carolina's Medicaid claims dataset covering outpatient and inpatient medical and psychiatric service claims with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses and medication prescriptions between January 1996 and December 2006 for patients ≤ 17 years of age. RESULTS:The cohort included 22,797 cases diagnosed with ADHD at a mean age of 7.8 years; 1,604 (7.0%) were diagnosed with bipolar disorderat a mean age of 12.2 years. The bipolar disorder group developed conduct disorder (CD)/oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), anxiety disorder, and a substance use disorder later than the ADHD-only group. The odds of a child with ADHD developing bipolar disorder were significantly and positively associated with a comorbid diagnosis of CD/ODD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.01), anxiety disorder (aOR = 2.39), or substance use disorder (aOR = 1.88); longer treatment with methylphenidate, mixed amphetamine salts, or atomoxetine (aOR = 1.01); not being African American (aOR = 1.61); and being treated with certain antidepressant medications, most notably fluoxetine (aOR = 2.00), sertraline (aOR = 2.29), bupropion (aOR = 2.22), trazodone (aOR = 2.15), or venlafaxine (aOR = J Clin Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;75(11):e1278-83. doi: 10.4088/JCP.14m09046. Correlates of incident bipolar disorder in children and adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivitydisorder. Jerrell JM1, McIntyre RS, Park YM. Author information AbstractBACKGROUND:The greater severity and chronicity of illness in youths with co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder deserve further investigation as to the risk imparted by comorbid conditions and the pharmacotherapies employed. METHOD:A retrospective cohort design was employed, using South Carolina's Medicaid claims dataset covering outpatient and inpatient medical and psychiatric service claims with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses and medication prescriptions between January 1996 and December 2006 for patients ≤ 17 years of age. RESULTS:The cohort included 22,797 cases diagnosed with ADHD at a mean age of 7.8 years; 1,604 (7.0%) were diagnosed with bipolar disorderat a mean age of 12.2 years. The bipolar disorder group developed conduct disorder (CD)/oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), anxiety disorder, and a substance use disorder later than the ADHD-only group. The odds of a child with ADHD developing bipolar disorder were significantly and positively associated with a comorbid diagnosis of CD/ODD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.01), anxiety disorder (aOR = 2.39), or substance use disorder (aOR = 1.88); longer treatment with methylphenidate, mixed amphetamine salts, or atomoxetine (aOR = 1.01); not being African American (aOR = 1.61); and being treated with certain antidepressant medications, most notably fluoxetine (aOR = 2.00), sertraline (aOR = 2.29), bupropion (aOR = 2.22), trazodone (aOR = 2.15), or venlafaxine (aOR = 2.37) prior to the first diagnosis of mania. Venlafaxine carries the day! Huzzah! CONCLUSIONS: Controlling for pharmacotherapy differences, incident bipolar disorder was more likely in individuals clustering specific patterns of comorbid psychiatric disorders, suggesting that there are different pathways to bipolarity and providing a clinical impetus for prioritizing prevention and preemptive strategies to reduce their hazardous influence. But the drug classes correlate with the disorders--you can't really control for them (calculate their effects away) - WC