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Found 9 results

  1. Hello, I was diagnosed with fibro in 1994. I was just diagnosed by a rheumatologist with CSS - central sensitivity syndrome. A central nervous system disease/disorder that makes people hypersensitive to almost everything. Here are two studies that might be of interest: Fibromyalgia and Overlapping Disorders: The Unifying Concept of Central Sensitivity Syndromes by Muhammad B Yunus, MD -also: clinical review and education- JAMA April 16, 2014 volume 311, number 15 - Fibromyalgia A Clinical Review by Daniel J Clauw, MD. These articles show how the central nervous system plays a huge role in why so many of us have fibromyalgia CFS/ME, MCS-Multiple Chemical Sensitivities, etc. This explains why I've had so much trouble with antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and withdrawals, along with so many other physical and emotional symptoms
  2. Piapil

    Initially I was diagnosed way back in 1977 when I made my first acquaintance with our mental health care system. A very bad acquaintance which sadly lasted for 40 years. I have childhood trauma which never has been touched upon. In that time all sorts of terrible drugs have been shoved down my throat by all sorts of terrible psychiatrists. Recently I tapered off the AD cipralex ( Escitalopram) over 2 months, from 10mg to zero. I am still on anti-psychotic , tapered from 30mg to 6mg in 7 years. The AD withdrawal symptoms are so bad. Crying a lot of the time, depressed, nausea , all sorts of pains in the body, including my feet. I guess I am experiencing waves , no windows lately. Everything is just bad. Anger, irritability,no appetite. It's really so awful. I have gained confidence, though, that it will all end some day, by reading these posts.I guess I'll just have to persevere. I am not going back on any drugs. I refuse. I don't even consult my doctor bc they are all just drug pushers and I don't want to listen to their crap. I've bought some cannabis oil I'll start on soon. It won't harm I'm sure. I take a lot of supplements, including fish oil, turmeric, glucosamine, calcium and c, d and b vitaminer. I've taken supplements for years. I have a pretty staple healthy diet, don't weight too much and generally get a lot of exexcise by walking and commuting. I don't work anymore ( for years) I will have to consult a specialist when I come off the last anti-psychotic dose. Bc that has proven difficult the last few mgs. I will wait until I'm well over the AD withdrawal. I am healthy physically but have little or no network or family for support. Am very much a loner. And that is probably the main issue, not depression or anything else. But loneliness . I quit the AD bc they didn't help much,they made me angry, irrational, depressed and suicidal. AD is not the solution to loneliness.
  3. my therapist suggested I use a weighted blanket, but to be honest, I'd been thinking about getting one for some time. The only thing holding me back was the price, they are expensive!! I am fairly sure it's going to help me with anxiety and dissociation, because any time I've had a lead blanket on me during xrays, I've just felt so calm, I didn't want them to take it off!! As it turns out, though, you don't have to buy one, you can make them yourself. My therapist has made some for grandkids and others. She gave me some tips and told me of a few places where I could get the plastic pellets or beads for a good price (but I found an even better price, thankfully) I already had some good fabric, so for about $38 (for the plastic pellets, 12 lbs worth**), I'll soon have my own weighted blanket. It's taking me a long time to make it because my brain is toast lately. then I'll need to make a cover for it, because these can't be washed in a machine but once it's done, I'll let you know how it works out. I think these were originally designed for autistic children but they are now used for a lot of other reasons, one site that sells them has this list: Who Can Benefit? ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) ADD / ADHD Aggressive Behaviors Agitation Alzheimer's Anxiety Disorder Asperger's Syndrome Bi-Polar Disorder Brain Trauma Injuries Cancer Anxiety Cerebral Palsy CHARGE Syndrome Chemo Anxiety Dental Anxiety Down Syndrome Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Fibromyalgia Insomnia Menopause Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Pain Parkinson's Disease PDD-NOS Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Restless Leg Syndrome Restless Sleep Rett's Syndrome Seizure Disorder Sensory Processing Disorder Tension Tourette's Syndrome Williams Syndrome **they recommend 1lb of pellets for every 10lbs of body weight, plus an extra pound, but I don't have the money to buy more. I'm going to make a blanket that does not cover my feet, anyway, so it'll be a bit shorter and hopefully there will be enough weight where I need it the most.
  4. Hi Everyone! I started taking Lexapro three years ago at the age of 24 after therapy sessions and the occasional Xanax were no longer working for my anxiety. My psychologist diagnosed me with OCD and GAD. Dread is the only way I can explain it. Vicious thoughts and dread. I wasn't depressed nor had I ever been and this hit me like a ton of bricks. I would be out and then this wave of panic would come out of no where. Dizzying and all consuming. I would start crying, become dizzy, and just be in an all out panic. It got to the point where aside from getting up and going to work everyday (getting out of the door was the hardest) I would basically refuse to do anything. Otherwise I would shake and feel like an elephant was sitting on my chest. I started with my general physician putting me on 5mg of Lexapro and then eventually going all the way up to 20mg. Aside from noticing a drop in my libido, slight dulling of feelings, and mild tiredness I felt like a new person. I actually remember the exact place I was where I felt those all consuming mind racing thoughts turn off. For the next three years I was perfect. Lexapro pretty much saved me. Recently in November of 2016 I decided that I wanted to go off. I was in a different place in my life. I was working, going to grad school and nights and living on my own. In hindsight I probably should have waited until I finished grad school since I was/am at one of the most stressful times in my life. Full time job, while taking a full three classes per semester at nights. But hey hindsight is 20/20 right? I tapered over three months. Probably too quickly, and by the end of January I was entirely off. My only immediate withdrawal symptoms were dizziness (not enough to stop me from driving) and I remember for about a week and half every time I would shift my eyes it felt like it took my brain a second to catch up. Finally nothing. I thought I was free. I was feeling again, my emotions came back, but all without that feeling of dread. Two weeks ago, about five months after I've been Lexapro free, I got the worst stomach virus I've had in years/gastritis/my period all in one week. I wasn't eating and I had lost 10lbs. I'm small to being with so I went from 118 to 108 quick. Then... It hit. Sick on a Wednesday and by Sunday I had the worst panic attack I've had in years. To get up from my bed was crippling. Am I relapsing? My mind was flooded. The PTSD was so bad from the thought of me relapsing into what I was pre-Lexapro crippled me. And since then I haven't been able to stop crying. My dizziness had returned along with chills, mind racing, feeling like I wanted to jump out of my own skin and rip it off, and the non stop crying. To the point opening my mouth and talking about a plain wall would make me start crying. I also have no appetite. The thought of eating makes me feel sick. I called my doctor and during my virus check up visit he gave me .25mg of Xanax. I thought this would kick it but it hasn't. It actually made me feel worse. I see my psychologist tomorrow to now talk about whats happening to me. My doctor said if this doesn't go away I cannot be reliant upon Xanax and I would have to go back on my Lexapro, but I DON'T WANT TO. I only took the Xanax once and I really am fighting to not take another, even though I feel like I am being tortured by my own mind. I want to be medicine free. I know what SSRI's can do to the body. That five months of freedom of no drugs and no anxiety were amazing. My questions are: Am I relapsing? or am I still withdrawing? Any advice? I am so scared that this isn't going to go away and that I am going to be right back to square 1. Thank you!! xx
  5. I've been taking seroquel for PTSD for two years. I was taking 600 mg XR a day. In addition to this, I was taking a diabetes drug - metformin - to stop the outrageous hunger caused by seroquel. I've had a flare up of my eating disorder and decided that come hell or high water that I must get off the seroquel. Taking the combination of 600mg XR seroquel and 2000mg XR metformin, I managed to drop my weight down from a disgusting 72kg to a more tolerable 57kg (I'm 155cms tall) and stopped losing weight. No matter how much I restrict or exercise, I can't lose weight and haven't lost anything at all for 2 months. I did some research and decided to move across to Prazosin because it's also an alpha 1 adrenergic receptor antagonist like seroquel, but it's not sedating and doesn't cause you to gain weight or get metabolic syndrome either. So while I'm titrating up Prazosin at 2mg a day until I get to a dose of 30mg a day (I'm currently at 25 mg). But I've been simultaneously reducing my seroquel by 50mg a day - or I was until I completely lost my patience and remembering what my psychiatrist said about seroquel tapering, I started dropping my dose by 100mg every 5 days. For the most part, everything's been totally fine, except for a few days of insomnia. Now that I've gone from 50mg XR to 0, it's hit the fan and I can't sleep. Like I can be tired and feel physically relaxed but my brain won't stop thinking and over thinking and I can't fall asleep no matter what I do. I generally pass out at about 5 am and sleep until maybe 9 am, if I'm lucky. Until the prazosin was titrated to above 20mg a day, I was completely and irrationally suicidal and had to take all of my medications to my pastor and ask him to look after them because I was convinced that I'd overdose on them. I rang my psychiatrist and his only advice was to keep on with the seroquel and I absolutely refuse to do this. I feel like if I do that I'll a] never get off it and b] never lose any more weight. Will this insomnia go away? Or will I need to get an alternate drug to make me sleep until the seroquel is out of my system and my brain has adjusted? I just don't know what to do. University starts back in a week and I have to sleep if I expect to study. If I can't study, I can't eat because I'll lose my merit scholarship. IDK what to do. Anyone got any ideas, advice, help?
  6. Greetings! I am very fortunate I found this site. I will not go into to much detail but here are some facts about my current situation. I have had anxiety/panic my entire life, from the earliest I can remember I used to have horrible separation anxiety, agoraphobia, and just plain being scared of silly things, like when I was younger I was terrified of thunderstorms and elevators I had to do exposure therapy while I was little and that was pretty difficult but it defiantly was not enough. My mother didn't put me on pharmaceuticals until I was 12 or so because the SSRIs were fairly new and she wanted to wait as long as she possibly could do try one of these medications. Flash forward to 2005, my father dies on the treadmill right in front of me, I am still in high school, and my anxiety up to that point was manageable, put when that happend my anxiety went through the roof. I couldn't finish high school in public but I was fortunate enough to have some retired teachers come to my house so I could graduate with my class. Of course during this time I was seeing a psychiatrist. Now he is an intelligent man and I have a number of medications to be thankful for, especially getting me out of that trauma. I was on a Tricyclic Anafranil 150 mg, from 2006 to 2013 for anxiety. During November 2013, I tried getting off the medication because it wasn't working and it was effecting my speech (probably from the anticholinergic effects). I tried to get off of it several times before but was given bad withdrawing advice (cut dose in half and 2 weeks you will be good), well that never happened of course. The old, see you need your medication, none of these brain zaps you speak of cannot occur with these drugs. So I followed the doctors advice and continued taking the Anafranil for a few more years. In November 2013 I tried to get off Anafranil for good. I wanted to do half the dose but just stay on that dose for like a month and then go down another quarter or something and try it that way. I had no idea how wrong both the doctor and I were. As soon as I lowered the dose I became a basket case. I started crying for no reason, I lost a bunch of weight (about 25 pounds in a month), vertigo, heart palpitations which scared the crap out of me because my father died from a birth defect we were not aware of at 49. I went back to the psychiatrist who I had seen for 6 years and was slapped with a bi-polar diagnosis. After doing a lot of research and looking into these drugs I didn't realize that the withdrawal could be so severe, or that most doctors had no idea that these drugs were capable of producing such a profound effect upon discontinuation. I reinstated the drug after 6 months of shear terror and my heart rate returned to normal, my crying stopped and it was like none of it ever happened. Now my main concern is with my heart because part of my anxiety would be dying in a similar fashion my father did. I have a great cardiologist who I have been seeing for years. He was fortunate enough to understand what was happening to me. I had every test imaginable and everything came back normal. Even when my heart was skipping a lot during the withdrawal, the holter monitor didn't pick up anything. He said its not so much your heart, its the receptors on your vagus nerve which is the main problem which makes since because they up regulate and down regulate depending if you are starting or stopping a drug. He said these drugs can effect the QT prolongation of the heart sometimes, but every EKG and Echo looked good so thank god for that. I stared back on the 150 in mid 2014 and currently I am on 60 mgs as of now. Now I think I misread because I tapered 10 mg every month instead of 10 percent of the dose, which is what a lot of people recommend. So what I am going to do as of now is try to stabilize on 50 mgs for a few months, since I am almost done with the 60 mg, and then taper down 5 mg every month which is roughly about 10 percent of the dose, I have calculated. I just hope this process goes a lot smoother than it did before because when I first tried my psychiatrists way it was absolutely horrible.
  7. Used Remeron for a couple of months, and was weirdly content at all times, but also zombie/lethargic/sedated, and it increases my adhd symptoms/stops mt adhd meds from working. Meh, ill write more later. Been lurking on this forum after my first taper attemt was to impatiemt, and backfired after 2-3 weeks. Got a sore throat todat, and feeling a bit sick, not sure if it is from tapering or if I'm actually getting a cold. Feel sick from time to time, that is probably due to cutting Remeron from 7,5 mg to half of that. Was on 7,5 (from 15) for 3 or 4 weeks, and it was fine, except that I was still umable to get anything done. A lot of my meds history indicates that I'm a poor metaboliser, and when I read that the antihistamine effect was full even on small doses og Remeron, I dropped to the last dose of 3.75. A little trouble with sleeping, but melatonin helps. Eating got better after adhd meds was increased, cuz now head works better. Im not spaced out. Basically a nuber of symptoms coyld either ve tapering symptoms, or; because reducing remeron might give more room for adhd meds to work, side effects of Vyvanse. After dropping remeron I have washed clothes for the first time in 1 or 2 months. Yay! Meh. Need to have patience. When Remeron tapering is done I need to look on my adhd dose. Writing symptoms & diary is a good idea. Lasted for 2 weeks, perhaps itnwent south when I started with Remeron. Didn't know it blocked histamine receptors, know from experience that antihistamines and ritalin made me so "woosy" I could not walk straight. Yeha, Remeron, and also tapering, messes up my adhd. Big time.just look at this post. Took it to reduce ptsd symptoms, sleep more and eat more. Not having so many triggers now (change of situation), so going to try to use adhd meds alone. Being so sensitive to meds it's not tempting to spend several months trying out something that is likely to give too troublesome side effects. As in not functioning. Want to cook, take out trash and get stuff done, not play app games all day and too litle energy to shower or change a light bulb. I'll sort out my introduction later.
  8. Congress Proposes Research on the Link Between Psychiatric Drugs and Suicide By Chuck Ruby, PhD Featured Blogs March 30, 2016 Congressman David Jolly (FL-13) has recently introduced the Veteran Suicide Prevention Act (H.R. 4640). The bill calls for the VA to study veteran suicides over the past five years and to determine what extent psychiatric drugs are implicated in those suicides. The International Society of Ethical Psychology and Psychiatry (ISEPP) has long been concerned about this issue, and more broadly, how our veterans and military members suffering from the horrors of war and other traumatic experiences are being treated. I sent letters of support to Mr. Jolly’s office, offering ISEPP’s assistance in any way possible. In 2012, ISEPP launched “Operation Speak Up” (OSU) as a response to the alarmingly high suicide rate of veterans. The name signifies our desire to help veterans speak up, rather than being shut up with psychiatric drugs. Although it started as an effort to encourage Congress to consider a non-medical model approach to helping those suffering from trauma, it quickly turned into a grassroots and consumer focused endeavor from the ground up under the leadership of our OSU Director, Mary Vieten, Ph.D., ABPP, U.S. Naval Reserve Commander. Mary has since made great strides in partnering with Melwood, Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to helping people with disabilities in the greater Washington DC area. Together with Melwood’s support and funding, Mary has created a program called TOHIDU (a Cherokee word meaning “peace of mind, body, and spirit”) as a wonderful alternative to conventional treatment. You can see more about TOHIDU here. Mr. Jolly’s bill will be the first to establish congressional oversight of this alarming problem of using psychiatric drugs shotgun style to quiet the screams of trauma. Despite the increasing concerns of the deleterious effects of psychiatric drugs, they continue to be the mainstay form of treatment within the VA and Defense Department, as they are on the outside. This has to change.The extant research makes it abundantly clear that psychiatric drugs do not correct chemical imbalances. It would be better said that they cause chemical imbalances. They artificially alter brain chemistry in ways that are not clearly understood, and that numb important emotions that signal meaningful issues in our lives. The brain tries to counteract their effect by making changes in how neurotransmitters are used. The person experiences these changes in very agonizing ways, the most worrisome is called “akathisia,” or a state of agitation, restlessness, and a terrible sense of not feeling welcome in one’s own skin. This can lead to unpredictable irritability and violent behavior, including violence toward oneself. To read more on this, see ISEPP’s White Paper. More here: http://www.madinamerica.com/2016/03/congress-proposes-research-on-the-link-between-psychiatric-drugs-and-suicide/ Also on that page is information about how to contact Congress to express your support for this bill. It would be a great idea to also encourage them to investigate the suicide-drug link in other populations too!
  9. I joined this site last week, and I'm happy to report that I have begun my withdrawal today following the 10% guideline as an organizing principle. My body and my brain state will dictate my actual pace! Please see my signature for my withdrawal particulars. The only other medication I take is Vyvanse 40 mg daily. I must say, Vyvanse has had a major positive impact on my life. Struggling with a prefrontal cortex disorder (so inadequately discribed as ADHD by the DSM series over the years) that I had no idea I had for 55 years provides me with a very thorough "before" context for the before and after comparison. In my wildest dreams before trying Vyvanse, I could not have imagined the degree of cognitive clarity I enjoy now. I am also a lot more at ease, now that I have confidence that my cognitive abilities are reliable, day after day. I have an extensive history of being on and off a variety of psychoactive medications. I do not remember particulars such as dosages of medications I took years ago. 1992 Prozac as monotherapy, discontinued suddenly and replaced with Lithium by my psychiatrist. Lithium discontinued in late 1993. 1995-2002 As monotherapy: Paxil, succeeded by Zoloft, succeeded by Wellbutrin. Tapered off of Wellbutrin by my prescriber, but quickly. 2003-200 Wellbutrin and Effexor taken concurrently. Medically "managed" taper of 4 weeks. 2006-Jun 2012 Lexapro 30 mg daily. Wellbutrin 150 mg daily added Feb 2012, discontinued Jun 2012. Feb 2012-Jun 2012 Lithium 300 mg, twice daily. All of my medication withdrawals were medically supervised, but nevertheless very rapid in retrospect using the wealth of personal experience I have read on this site. So there you go, just the facts. I will check in regularly with Lamictal withdrawal updates, further research sorties, and especially to tap the experience of others if I hit rough patches during my withdrawal
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