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Cymbalta for Fibro


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#1 Skyler

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 02:57 PM

I just had a question about the use of Cymbalta for Fibro... Has the bloom gone from the Lilly for the use of Cymbalta for this Dx? Is there anywhere I can be referred for info on this specifically? Thanks so much for reading! Georgie

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

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#2 Altostrata

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 03:16 PM

A number of antidepressants are approved for various pain conditions. Also PMS and menopausal hot flashes. And IBS. And whatever. All this means is that drug companies put some money into studies.

 

They need to show the FDA only two successful studies on a drug to get on-label approval for a specific condition. They may have conducted 98 studies that show the drug is a failure, but if they can somehow produce 2 favorable studies (for which statistics may have been manipulated), that's all the FDA needs to approve the drug for that condition.

 

The studies drug companies pay for (and get published) tend to support expanding use of the drug for some specific condition; they then use them in marketing campaigns to sell the drug to the general public and doctors so it will be prescribed to even more people.

 

Have you seen a commercial for Cymbalta lately? That should set off alarm bells. Does Cymbalta work for fibro? Does Prozac work for PMS? Does Effexor work for hot flashes? It's hard to know the truth.

 

What did happen is that the pharmaceutical industry expanded the use of drugs that were questionable in their original indication (depression) and made them into huge, huge moneymakers that primary care doctors could prescribe for just about anything women complain about. And while they expanded the markets for their drugs, pharma hid adverse effects, so it's impossible to tell whether the potential benefit of a drug outweighs its risk -- an essential criterion for medication.

 

It's too bad, Georgie, that you or I or any patient has to figure out the risk-benefit analysis for taking an antidepressant, but the medical literature for these drugs is so clouded by fraud of various types it's hard to say these drugs are "good" for any condition unless the patient is truly, truly desperate and is willing to try anything, even a drug that might be damaging, to get relief.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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#3 summer

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 07:34 PM

After reading your post, I remb that several years ago I was put on Cymbalta for "possible" Fibro. Yes, you read that correctly... possible! I knew immediately I had made a stupid mistake. I stopped taking it around 2-3 weeks in and started the Celexa. Fortunately the switch worked for me. When I see the commercials, I know I did the right thing by getting off it quickly. It's a very difficult AD to taper.... one of the more difficult ones.

Wellbutrin: 150mg.

Xanax: .5 once daily

 

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#4 compsports

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 11:44 PM

After reading your post, I remb that several years ago I was put on Cymbalta for "possible" Fibro. Yes, you read that correctly... possible! I knew immediately I had made a stupid mistake. I stopped taking it around 2-3 weeks in and started the Celexa. Fortunately the switch worked for me.

When I see the commercials, I know I did the right thing by getting off it quickly. It's a very difficult AD to taper.... one of the more difficult ones.


Hi Summer,

My former psychiatrist offered Cymbalta as an alternative to Wellbutrin XL when I had concerns about tinnitus. I declined because I was concerned that it would be a tough drug to get off of. It is one of the best decisions I made and thank my lucky star every day for that.

I am glad you escaped Cymbalta h-ll.

CS

Drug cocktail 1995 - 2010
Started taper of Adderall, Wellbutrin XL, Remeron, and Doxepin in 2006
Finished taper on June 10, 2010

Diagnosed with sleep apnea 2012 and on pap machine

Dealing with protracted sleep issues


#5 Altostrata

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 02:12 PM

These polls of patients show:

 

- Cymbalta dead last among 85 treatments for fibromyalgia http://curetogether....e-rest-is-best/

- Cymbalta dead last among 35 treatments for neuropathy http://curetogether....-35-treatments/

- Cymbalta (and Wellbutrin) very mediocre among 83 treatments for depression (Effexor and Paxil barely effective) http://curetogether....one-year-later/ -- exercise, pets, art therapy, talk therapy rate much higher.

 

Low-dose naltrexone or LDN has a cult following among people suffering from various conditions -- see the results for fibromyalgia, neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis . It may well be the sort of thing that doctors overlook because it's not promoted by pharma -- it's a very old generic drug. (I talked to a knowledgeable psychiatrist recently and he says he's used it successfully for OCD cutting and other self-harming conditions for many years. He didn't think it was appropriate for withdrawal syndrome.)


Edited by Altostrata, 19 December 2014 - 02:54 PM.
corrected link

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

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#6 summer

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 06:14 PM

Alto... be sure to let the doctors in on the results of your last post! Apparently, they are unaware. :rolleyes:

Wellbutrin: 150mg.

Xanax: .5 once daily

 

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#7 Altostrata

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 09:05 AM

The doctors are influenced by TV ads just like everyone else. Cymbalta for fibro is a case of if you repeat a lie often enough, people believe it to be true.
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

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#8 summer

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 10:10 AM

The doctors are influenced by TV ads just like everyone else.



This is so wrong on so many levels. Doctors shouldn't be "learning" or influenced by television commercials. It's bad enough that lay people do.

Wellbutrin: 150mg.

Xanax: .5 once daily

 

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#9 Altostrata

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 05:36 PM

Our gods have big stinky feet of clay, summer.
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#10 Nadia

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 09:02 AM

Low-dose naltrexone or LDN has a cult following among people suffering from various conditions -- see the results for fibromyalgia, neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis . It may well be the sort of thing that doctors overlook because it's not promoted by pharma -- it's a very old generic drug. (I talked to a knowledgeable psychiatrist recently and he says he's used it successfully for OCD cutting and other self-harming conditions for many years. He didn't think it was appropriate for withdrawal syndrome.)


Glad you mentioned that... GAPS suggests low-dose naltrexone, and I was curious about it because my dad and niece have an autoimmune disease that is supposed to get good results with that. What with everything being so connected I started wondering if it might not help with withdrawal (this dumb search for a solution).

'94-'08 On/off ADs. Mostly Zoloft & Wellbutrin, but also Prozac, Celexa, Effexor, etc.
6/08 quit Z & W after tapering, awful anxiety 3 mos. later, reinstated.
11/10 CTed. Severe anxiety 3 mos. later & @ 8 mos. much worse (set off by metronidazole). Anxiety, depression, anhedonia, DP, DR, dizziness, severe insomnia, high serum AM cortisol, flu-like feelings, muscle discomfort.
9/11-9/12 Waves and windows of recovery.
10/12 Awful relapse, DP/DR. Hydrocortisone?
11/12 Improved fairly quickly even though relapse was one of worst waves ever.

1/13 Best I've ever felt.

3/13 A bit of a relapse... then faster and shorter waves and windows.

4/14 Have to watch out for triggers, but feel completely normal about 80% of the time.


#11 btdt

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 08:16 PM

These polls of patients show:

- Cymbalta dead last among 85 treatments for fibromyalgia http://curetogether....e-rest-is-best/

- Cymbalta dead last among 35 treatments for neuropathy http://curetogether....earch-findings/

- Cymbalta (and Wellbutrin) very mediocre among 83 treatments for depression (Effexor and Paxil barely effective) http://curetogether....earch-findings/ -- exercise, pets, art therapy, talk therapy rate much higher.


Low-dose naltrexone or LDN has a cult following among people suffering from various conditions -- see the results for fibromyalgia, neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis . It may well be the sort of thing that doctors overlook because it's not promoted by pharma -- it's a very old generic drug. (I talked to a knowledgeable psychiatrist recently and he says he's used it successfully for OCD cutting and other self-harming conditions for many years. He didn't think it was appropriate for withdrawal syndrome.)

I did some work on Naltrexone can be found here
http://www.topix.com...E0A0JG5NMQVJFQ3


WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivinganti...ng-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)


#12 btdt

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 08:27 PM

After reading your post, I remb that several years ago I was put on Cymbalta for "possible" Fibro. Yes, you read that correctly... possible! I knew immediately I had made a stupid mistake. I stopped taking it around 2-3 weeks in and started the Celexa. Fortunately the switch worked for me.

When I see the commercials, I know I did the right thing by getting off it quickly. It's a very difficult AD to taper.... one of the more difficult ones.

Summer had you been on an AD already? I have a theory that ADs cause fibro... not just mine.
fibro link here
http://www.topix.com...Q28JNPL3K5DVSLT

WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

http://survivinganti...ng-myself-btdt/

There is a crack in everything ..That's how the light gets in :)


#13 Altostrata

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 01:53 PM

Please keep sort of on-topic. The off-topic posts were moved to their own topic. Thank you.
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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#14 Barbarannamated

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 01:47 PM

//http://www.therapeuticsdaily.com/news/article.cfm?contentValue=814507&contentType=newsarchive&channelID=26

Therapeutics Daily - Cymbalta (duloxetine)

I haven't found the full study/review yet. Sorry this is choppy.

Note the use of "chronic" and "long term" as it relates to the different indications/uses and 'lack of evidence that effect could be maintained over time', and repeated mention of benefits not outweighing risks.

They do say that GAD is "long term".

In reviewing for somatic pain, a long-term condition:
"There was also insufficient evidence that its effect could be maintained over time, which is important when treating a long-term condition."



Questions and answers on the refusal of a change to the marketing authorisations for Ariclaim, Cymbalta and Xeristar (duloxetine) - Outcome of re-examination
From the PharmaLive.com News Archive - Nov. 18, 2011

On 21 July 2011, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) adopted a negative opinion, recommending the refusal of a change to the marketing authorisations for the duloxetine-containing medicines Ariclaim, Cymbalta and Xeristar. The change concerned the addition of a new indication, the treatment of moderate to severe chronic somatic pain in patients not taking NSAIDs regularly. The company that applied for the change to the authorisation is Eli Lilly.

The applicant requested a re-examination of the opinion. After considering the grounds for this request, the CHMP re examined the initial opinion, and confirmed the refusal of the change to the marketing authorisations on 17 November 2011.

Q:What are Ariclaim, Cymbalta and Xeristar?

Ariclaim, Cymbalta and Xeristar are medicines containing the active substance duloxetine. They are available as gastroresistant capsules.

Ariclaim is used to treat pain due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (damage to the nerves in the extremities that can occur in patients with diabetes).

In addition to pain due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy, Cymbalta and Xeristar are also used in major depression and generalised anxiety disorder (long-term anxiety or nervousness about everyday matters).

Q: What were the medicines expected to be used for?

In addition to their approved uses, the three medicines were expected to be used to treat moderate to severe chronic (long-term) somatic pain in patients not regularly taking NSAID pain killers (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Somatic pain is from the body surfaces (such as skin) or musculoskeletal tissues (such as skeletal muscles, bone and joints). It does not include pain from internal organs such as the stomach and intestines.

Q: How are they expected to work?

The medicines are expected to work in the same way they do in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The active substance duloxetine, is a serotonin-noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor. It works by preventing the neurotransmitters 5-hydroxytrypamine (also called serotonin) and noradrenaline from being taken back up into nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. Neurotransmitters are chemicals that allow nerve cells to communicate with one another. By blocking their re-uptake, duloxetine increases the amount of these neurotransmitters in the spaces between these nerve cells, increasing the level of communication between the cells. Since these neurotransmitters are involved in reducing the sensation of pain, blocking their re-uptake into nerve cells may improve the symptoms of pain.

Q: What did the company present to support its application?

The company presented results of five main studies in 839 patients with chronic somatic pain: two studies in patients with knee pain caused by osteoarthritis (swelling and pain in the joints) and three in patients with chronic low back pain. Patients in the studies were treated with duloxetine or placebo (a dummy treatment) with some patients taking them in combination with NSAIDs. The main measure of effectiveness was the change in the severity of pain, as recorded by the patients on an 11-point scale after 12 or 13 weeks of treatment.

Q: What were the CHMP’s main concerns that led to the refusal of the change to the marketing authorisations?

The CHMP noted that the studies had not proven that duloxetine would provide a relevant benefit in the indication applied for. There was also insufficient evidence that its effect could be maintained over time, which is important when treating a long-term condition. In addition, more information was needed on the effects of duloxetine in elderly patients and its safety in the intended patients including the elderly. The CHMP therefore concluded that the benefits of duloxetine in the treatment of moderate to severe chronic somatic pain in patients not regularly taking NSAIDs had not been shown to outweigh its risks.During the re-examination, the Committee considered the use of duloxetine in a smaller group of patients: patients with chronic low back pain or osteoarthritis (swelling and pain in the joints) of at least moderate severity who cannot use NSAIDS. The Committee concluded however that its concerns had still not been adequately addressed and confirmed its initial negative opinion recommending the refusal of a change to the marketing authorisations. What consequences does this refusal have for patients in clinical trials or compassionate use programmes?

The company informed the CHMP that there are currently no ongoing clinical trials with Ariclaim, Cymbalta and Xeristar in chronic somatic pain patients in Europe.

Q: What is happening with Ariclaim, Cymbalta and Xeristar for in their approved indications?

There are no consequences on the use of these medicines in their approved indications, for which the balance of benefits and risks remains unchanged.

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Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

#15 Shanti

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 02:01 PM

I have been on both Cymbalta and Savilla for Fibro. Neither worked and caused me nothing but pain.
Taper from Cymbalta, Paxil, Prozac & Antipsychotics finished June 2012.
Xanax 5% Taper - (8/12 - .5 mg) - (9/12 - .45) - (10/12 - .43) - (11/12 - .41) - (12/12 - .38)
My Paxil Website
My Intro

#16 Altostrata

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 05:56 PM

Barbarannamated, perhaps you can show your doctor husband the results from these patient surveys http://survivinganti...ndpost__p__9933
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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#17 Shanti

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 01:27 PM

Yes, Cymbalta is one with wicked withdrawals. I was put on it also for Fibromyalgia and it didn't help me with that.
Taper from Cymbalta, Paxil, Prozac & Antipsychotics finished June 2012.
Xanax 5% Taper - (8/12 - .5 mg) - (9/12 - .45) - (10/12 - .43) - (11/12 - .41) - (12/12 - .38)
My Paxil Website
My Intro

#18 Barbarannamated

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 02:12 PM


The doctors are influenced by TV ads just like everyone else.



This is so wrong on so many levels. Doctors shouldn't be "learning" or influenced by television commercials. It's bad enough that lay people do.

However about MDs starring in drug commercials ~YIKES
Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

#19 Skyler

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 03:18 PM

They may have conducted 98 studies that show the drug is a failure, but if they can somehow produce 2 favorable studies (for which statistics may have been manipulated), that's all the FDA needs to approve the drug for that condition.


Sick

Have you seen a commercial for Cymbalta lately? That should set off alarm bells.


Humph, I stay as far away from commercials as I can. I am a Netflix independent movie buff, so until the kill my Golden Goose, it's good deal.

Huge moneymakers that primary care doctors could prescribe for just about anything women complain about.


That is one place I'm fortunate with my doc, his wife is really neat.. she works in his one doc office, and it's always a joy to see her. There were mentions of Dr. Welby a while back. I often think of my doc in that way. I know his entire family, including his daughter who has a serious developmental disability. Really neat folks. In any case.. round the bend that, when I asked him about taking Cymbalta for fibro, a few years back, pre Whitaker, he told me I was on enough crap and did not need any more. He's far from perfect, but very much into learning mode. A good listener, and he does not believe drugs are what they are touted to be.

It's hard to say these drugs are "good" for any condition unless the patient is truly, truly desperate and is willing to try anything, even a drug that might be damaging, to get relief.


I got on Lyrica to help with fibro flares... it's the only drug on the market that really helps, and look at where that has gotten me. Oh, and the poop is if it helps, one then needs to stay on it. Also not true, as fibro waxes and wanes, but there are a lot of people that are now parked on it.

Thanks for your thoughtful reply,
Schuyler

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 


#20 Nikki

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 04:35 PM

Georgie from three websites on AD Withdrawal, Cymbalta is up there with Effexor and Paxil for a miserable withdrawal from the posts I've read. It is just not worth the chance that it might work IMO. I don't know anything about Lyrica, and was not surprised at how rotten a drug it is to get off of. Is there anything holistically that may provide relief. Accupuncture, does massage help or cause more pain? I have never taken it, but Arnica is for pain. Just had a thought. Epidural....I have had a few of them and they worked like a charm for back pain that radiates across hips and legs. Hugs

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#21 Jemima

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 04:53 PM


The doctors are influenced by TV ads just like everyone else.


This is so wrong on so many levels. Doctors shouldn't be "learning" or influenced by television commercials. It's bad enough that lay people do.


If you're having a bad day, summer, don't read this.

Doctors are required by state licensing boards to acquire a certain number of continuing education credits for every licensing period, which varies from state to state. In Pennsylvania, 100 credit hours are required every two years and there are certain requirements within those requirements to take certain categories of medical courses.

All well and good, but the part that may ruin your day is that a lot of these approved courses are free, sponsored and presented by Big Pharma, no doubt with lovely catered lunches thrown in. They are often located at an attractive resort, and because any continuing ed expense is tax deductible, these trips can amount to an inexpensive vacation. (Most doctors I know are cheapskates and will jump at a free lunch, a free course, or a tax deductible vacation.)

I spend several hundred every year to maintain my CPA license and I'm sure the PA Board of Accountancy would discipline any member who took free courses or other gifts from say, Country Wide Mortgage or MF Global. It's really sad that a governing body that protects people from unqualified Certified Public Accountants is more fierce and ethical than most state medical boards, but there it is. :(

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"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." -Hanlon's Razor


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Success Story: http://survivinganti...r-dickhead-too/

Please note that I am not a medical professional and my advice is based on personal experience, reading, and anecdotal information posted by other sufferers.

 


#22 Skyler

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 07:40 AM

Is there anything holistically that may provide relief. Accupuncture, does massage help or cause more pain? I have never taken it, but Arnica is for pain.

Just had a thought. Epidural....I have had a few of them and they worked like a charm for back pain that radiates across hips and legs.

Hugs


My trusty occupational therapist is best now. Epidurals don't help because fibro is in the muscles, not the same as a nerve injury. I've had it for 35 long years. The first medication that worked was Lyrica. Obviously that is no longer a go.

Thanks for the suggestions,

Schuyler

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 


#23 Altostrata

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 09:36 AM

Not that you have a choice, now, Schuyler, but you can take Lyrica as needed, too. It's dosed in way too high an amount, as you're experiencing.
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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#24 Barbarannamated

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:47 AM

Acupuncture can be very helpful for a myriad of health problems so it seems like a reasonable option for fibro - Massage is very individual depending on the therapist and my type and level of pain which is musculoskeletal and not fibro - massage has increased my pain if too aggressive or if I need a chiro adjustment -
Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

#25 Barbarannamated

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:55 PM

I'm really uncomfortable with the whole need-to-take-med-daily-forever for chronic pain - I've had chronic pain (musculoskeletal) for years and somedays it's there and other days it's not - I have my own algorithm depending on how the cycle started and when I catch it: chiro - massage - acupuncture - aspirin - Salon Pas patches or similar - ice - Imitrex (helps w tension in neck/head as well as migraine)- opiate - I don't claim to understand difference btwn fibro and my musculoskeletal pain but have a negative gut feeling about prophylaxis treatment for symptoms that may wax and wane - Same feelings w migraine prophylaxis-
Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

#26 Skyler

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 03:40 AM

I'm really uncomfortable with the whole need-to-take-med-daily-forever for chronic pain -
I've had chronic pain (musculoskeletal) for years and somedays it's there and other days it's not - I have my own algorithm depending on how the cycle started and when I catch it: chiro - massage - acupuncture - aspirin - Salon Pas patches or similar - ice - Imitrex (helps w tension in neck/head as well as migraine)- opiate -
I don't claim to understand difference btwn fibro and my musculoskeletal pain but have a negative gut feeling about prophylaxis treatment for symptoms that may wax and wane -
Same feelings w migraine prophylaxis-


HI Barb.. just an fyi, fibro waxes and wanes but is present every day. The intensity and character vary, so when there is a flare, it is front and center most of the time, but otherwise, not as much. That said, Lyrica IS promoted for prophylaxis.. erroneously so. The pharmacist told me I needed to take it every day, as fibro is always there, but it only helps with the type of pain I have in flares, with the burning neuropathic pain that makes me feel like I'm on fire. From what Alto said, I may have been sold on needing more than I actually did. The party line is one needs 300 mgs for pain, and less may have worked almost as well? Duh... I did not realize I was on a high dose.. diabetics are told to take 600 mgs a day (sounds horrendous now)

Sorry to hear about the muscle pain you experience and glad you have found treatments that help, but still, never knowing when it will return must be draining.

Schuyler

As always, LISTEN TO YOUR BODY! A proud supporter of the 10% (or slower) rule.

 

Requip - 3/16 ZERO  Total time on 25 years.

 

Lyrica: 8/15 ZERO Total time on 7 or 8 yrs.

BENZO FREE 10/13 (started tapering 7/10)  Total time on 25 years.

 

Read my intro thread here, and check the about me section.  "No matter how cynical you get, it's almost impossible to keep up." Lily Tomlin

 

 


#27 btdt

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 09:42 AM

 

These polls of patients show:

- Cymbalta dead last among 85 treatments for fibromyalgia http://curetogether....e-rest-is-best/

- Cymbalta dead last among 35 treatments for neuropathy http://curetogether....earch-findings/

- Cymbalta (and Wellbutrin) very mediocre among 83 treatments for depression (Effexor and Paxil barely effective) http://curetogether....earch-findings/ -- exercise, pets, art therapy, talk therapy rate much higher.


Low-dose naltrexone or LDN has a cult following among people suffering from various conditions -- see the results for fibromyalgia, neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis . It may well be the sort of thing that doctors overlook because it's not promoted by pharma -- it's a very old generic drug. (I talked to a knowledgeable psychiatrist recently and he says he's used it successfully for OCD cutting and other self-harming conditions for many years. He didn't think it was appropriate for withdrawal syndrome.)

I did some work on Naltrexone can be found here
http://www.topix.com...E0A0JG5NMQVJFQ3

 

Since the site is gone now you can find this here on wayback

 

https://web.archive....E0A0JG5NMQVJFQ3


WARNING THIS WILL BE LONG
Had a car accident in 85
Codeine was the pain med when I was release from hosp continuous use till 89
Given PROZAC by a specialist to help with nerve pain in my leg 89-90 not sure which year
Was not told a thing about it being a psych med thought it was a pain killer no info about psych side effects I went nuts had hallucinations. As I had a head injury and was diagnosed with a concussion in 85 I was sent to a head injury clinic in 1990 five years after the accident. I don't think they knew I had been on prozac I did not think it a big deal and never did finish the bottle of pills. I had tests of course lots of them. Was put into a pain clinic and given amitriptyline which stopped the withdrawal but had many side effects. But I could sleep something I had not done in a very long time the pain lessened. My mother got cancer in 94 they switched my meds to Zoloft to help deal with this pressure as I was her main care giver she died in 96. I stopped zoloft in 96 had withdrawal was put on paxil went nutty quit it ct put on resperidol quit it ct had withdrawal was put on Effexor... 2years later celexa was added 20mg then increased to 40mg huge personality change went wild. Did too fast taper off Celexa 05 as I felt unwell for a long time prior... quit Effexor 150mg ct 07 found ****** 8 months into withdrawal learned some things was banned from there in 08 have kept learning since. there is really not enough room here to put my history but I have a lot of opinions about a lot of things especially any of the drugs mentioned above.
One thing I would like to add here is this tidbit ALL OPIATES INCREASE SEROTONIN it is not a huge jump to being in chronic pain to being put on an ssri/snri and opiates will affect your antidepressants and your thinking.

As I do not update much I will put my quit date Nov. 17 2007 I quit Effexor cold turkey. 

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