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Non-drug techniques to cope with emotional symptoms


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#1 Altostrata

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Posted 18 August 2011 - 02:44 PM

Recovery from withdrawal syndrome is gradual, inconsistent, and can take a long time. In the meantime, you can use psychotherapeutic techniques to lessen your anxiety about your condition, deal with long-standing emotional issues, and cope with symptoms.

Many of the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome arise from autonomic nervous system dysfunction. The best way to treat this is to allow your nervous system to repair itself, to return to its "factory-installed" state.
 
Meanwhile, the distressed nervous system itself can generate intense uncomfortable feelings -- see Neuro emotions

Here are topics about psychotherapeutic techniques you might be able to use to help the recovery process along.
__________________________________________________
MEDITATION AND MINDFULNESS
 
Easing your way into meditation for a stressed-out nervous system
 
Mindfulness and Acceptance
 
Good links for anxiety/worry

Inhabiting our bodies in meditation http://wp.me/p5nnb-aSX

Meditation can heal the brain which can heal the mind and body

Mindfulness, Meditation, and Prayer After Brain Injury

Pranayama Breathing for Anxiety and Depression
 
__________________________________________________
COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY

Free online Cognitive Behavior Therapy lessons

Best CBT techniques for anxiety, depression, or getting through a wave?
 
__________________________________________________
FORGIVING YOURSELF
 
Blaming yourself for mistakes? Try this.
 
Shame, guilt, and self-criticism
 
__________________________________________________
HELPING YOURSELF BY HELPING OTHERS
 
The Magic of Helping Others
 
__________________________________________________
OTHER TYPES OF THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUES

"Change the channel" -- dealing with cognitive symptoms
 
Behavioral Activation Therapy: Getting out and doing things helps depression
 
"Forest bathing" reduces cortisol, aids mood, immune system

Virtual "forest bathing": Guided imagery for stress relief
 
EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques)
 
Neuroplasticity and limbic retraining

Self-directed Neuroplasticity
 
Reframe stress to become more resilient

 

Art Therapy

 

Journaling / Journalling / Writing Therapy / Therapeutic Writing

 

_______________________________________
UNUSUAL AND OVERPOWERING EMOTIONS

Non-drug techniques to cope with emotional symptoms
 
Neuro emotions

Shame, guilt, regret, and self-criticism

Uncontrollable crying spells during and after withdrawal
 
Coping with with irritation, anger and rage
 
Early-morning waking with panic or anxiety
 
Fear, terror, panic, and anxiety
 
Rebuilding self-confidence, accepting anxiety

Health anxiety, hypochondria, and obsession with symptoms

OCD: obsessive thoughts, compulsive behaviors

Anhedonia, apathy, demotivation

 

Journaling / Journalling / Writing Therapy / Therapeutic Writing


Edited by ChessieCat, 09 October 2016 - 02:24 PM.
updated

This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

#2 occupyingmyhealthcare

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:17 AM

Alto, I heard from another member today and decided to take some time to explore more and I found this Thanks. A few days ago I was contemplating how it would probably be a good idea to look into CBT. Hope your day is well. omhc

#3 Nikki

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:54 PM

Hi... I recently started Mindful Meditation. The facilitor is a Neurologist friend of mine, so he provides detailed info about how the brain responds to meditation. It has been difficult and I needed guided meditation like he offers to keep my focused. W/D makes my mind move100mph. The suggestion I recieved was to just practice & practice. I did use EMDR therapy whild tapering Lexapro and it was terrific. Sadly my health insurance no longer covers it. EMDR took the 'emotional charge' out of things. At that time I purchased the little hand held electronic device which you attache to your earlobes and there is a ticking pulse which caused immediate relaxation. Thank you so much for the suggested forms of help. There is a free website which I found on Crazymeds.com called moodgym.com....might be helful.

Intro: http://survivinganti...ndown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine


#4 Barbarannamated

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 01:10 PM

Nikki ~ Do you know what the ear treatment does or name of it ~ I had auriculotherapy (ear acupuncture) years ago and recall it being surprisingly effective ~ I haven't found a practitioner but some acupuncturists may do it ~ Thanks
Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

#5 fefesmom

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 06:57 PM

Hi. I just finished an 8 week course called Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy which I have found very helpful when I take the time and energy to use what I have learned. Jon Kabat-Zinn has written a good book about it called the Mindful Way Through Depression. It is a combination of meditation and cognitive therapy which focusses on being in the present moment, seeing thoughts as untrue no matter how true they may seem and focussing on your feelings (bodily) instead. It is very helpful in times of oncoming depression, anxiety etc. I don't know how effective it would be just to read the book; the support and interaction with the other participants and, of course, the teacher, was very important to me and the others in the class. This may be the first time I have offered something positive to this site in the 8 months I have been visiting. So, even though I still have very down times, there is hope.

#6 Altostrata

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 07:03 PM

fefes! It's always a positive when you visit. Thanks for the info. How are you putting this into practice in the day-to-day?
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

#7 Barbarannamated

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 07:08 PM

Fefesmom, It's good to hear from you. I'm glad you've found JKZ to be helpful. I read his "Wherever You Go, There You Are" awhile back and - darn! - it's true! ;) Your posts are always helpful to me, and others, I'm sure! I think the Abandonment Depression and "End of Family Line Depression" (the version I heard) we discussed briefly are somehow related. I value your input, FM. Barb
Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

#8 fefesmom

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 08:16 PM

Hi. How I am using what I've learned in MBCT is this: on days when I feel low (which happens all too frequently still/always) I remind myself to feel what I am feeling and to let my thoughts go by like clouds. I get so caught up in telling myself a story about why I feel this way and try to analyze it, understand it and I get all wrapped up and tied up in the story and the story is usually negative and totally unhelpful. These are old, familiar feelings even though they are so negative and painful; it is easy to stay in their story but I try to focus on the feeling in my body (usually in my gut) and just let the thoughts go. Also I try to stay in the present and focus on my breath. I am not always successful and I find my mood is okay for a couple of days and then very blue for a couple of days. I also try to "radically accept" that this is how it is for me, at this time anyhow. Sometimes that helps. In the past, aside from being on ads, I would analyze my thoughts and feelings and end up more tangled up. Hope this makes sense to you reading this; it isn't absolutely clear to me how this all works. All I know for sure is that I have to use these tools every day; I will never get over these issues but I do have ways to deal with them. It also helps to do things I enjoy for their own sake and, as I learned from so many of you over the months, to be gentle and kind to myself.

#9 GiaK

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 10:13 PM

a few simple yoga postures/techniques that can help with anxiety, restlessness and insomnia (I've found they help me) I posted a brief yoga video that helps calm in general on the blog here: NOT just for sleep! http://beyondmeds.co...8/23/yogarelax/ Another posture that really helps calm even iatrogenic terror is legs against the wall: http://beyondmeds.co...egsagainstwall/ (PICTURE OF POSTURE) and http://beyondmeds.co...ngpain/legwall/ (PICTURE OF POSTURE) experiment with the distance from the wall...then lay there and mindfully breath into your belly...hands on chest and belly can be nice...it's really GREAT! and can reset the entire system, I've found.

Beyond Meds: http://beyondmeds.com/

I withdrew from a cocktail of 6 psychiatric drugs that included every class of psych drug.

I took a bit over 6 years to do it. Finished on Feb 9 2010. I'm still recovering from iatrogenesis.


#10 GiaK

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 02:09 AM

oh...went back to bed and came up with another good one...also helpful for pain and/or anxiety/terror/restlessness (the above helps with all of that for me as well) A good old fashioned epsom salt bath! http://beyondmeds.co...26/healingtool/

Beyond Meds: http://beyondmeds.com/

I withdrew from a cocktail of 6 psychiatric drugs that included every class of psych drug.

I took a bit over 6 years to do it. Finished on Feb 9 2010. I'm still recovering from iatrogenesis.


#11 alexjuice

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 08:33 AM

Interesting about the poses. I need to try that. One thing that I've found fool proof to relied my distress is to help another person with their distress. Unfortunately this doesn't work, for me anyway, over the Internet. But I feel a lot of relief when I talk to my friends or anybody really either by phone or in person and focus my mind away from my own situation. This is really big in AA. When the founder first started it he tried to get other drunks sober but they all, at first, went back to drinking. He complained to his wife that it wasn't working and he might give it up. She told him, "but you're not drinking Bill, this is the longest you've ever been sober." Anyway, that's why I want to get a phone list together. Alex

"Well my ship's been split to splinters and it's sinking fast
I'm drowning in the poison, got no future, got no past
But my heart is not weary, it's light and it's free
I've got nothing but affection for all those who sailed with me.

Everybody's moving, if they ain't already there
Everybody's got to move somewhere
Stick with me baby, stick with me anyhow
Things should start to get interesting right about now."

- Zimmerman


#12 Barbarannamated

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 08:49 AM

To be needed is powerful. And very distracting in a good way, not that i wish problems on anyone. I've printed up contact cards "I'll run for you" to do those errands that most people complain about day-to-day. When friends were having kids and couldn't get out as easily, for example. People are very hesitant to ask for help (myself included). Phone list is a good idea, Alex. Especially if people find themselves in a health situation unexpectedly...getting stung by wasps and ending up in ER, for example.
Pristiq tapered over 8 months ending Spring 2011 after 18 years of polydrugging that began w/Zoloft for fatigue/general malaise (not mood). CURRENT: 1mg Klonopin qhs (SSRI bruxism), 75mg trazodone qhs, various hormonesLitigation for 11 years for Work-related injury, settled 2004. Involuntary medical retirement in 2001 (age 39). 2012 - brain MRI showing diffuse, chronic cerebrovascular damage/demyelination possibly vasculitis/cerebritis. Dx w/autoimmune polyendocrine failure.<p>2013 - Dx w/CNS Sjogren's Lupus (FANA antibodies first appeared in 1997 but missed by doc).

#13 Altostrata

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Posted 16 June 2012 - 09:56 AM

fefes, that's brilliant! Excellent summation of some very powerful techniques. Nobody can do mindful breathing meditation perfectly -- that's why it's called a practice.
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

#14 LaylaJuneBug

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

I was having a very hard day for some reason. Felt like crying, my needs weren't being met by my family and we had people coming over. I could have melted down and asked the guests not to come. I was close. I couldn't deal with my kids, even being civil to them. So I checked on this site for tips. Almost threw my phone through the wall because I couldn't log on but that's another story. :) I tried feet on the wall pose and did some breathing. Also tried breathing thru my left nostril on a tip from another site. I feel calmer and more settled. Lets hope I'm going back to my family in a better space. I'll let you know.
Zoloft for 10+ yrs (between 50 and 100 mg)
Switched to Citalopram 20 mg for the last year
Added 150 mg Welbutrin for Citalopram side effects
Started tapering from Citalopram - (20mg, then 10 mg, then 5 mg, then 5 mg every other day, then nothing, then reinstated to 5 mg per day to deal with discontinuation symptoms)
Currently on 5 mg (2.5 mL) liquid Citalopram and looking to taper at 10% each month.
Stopped Welbutrin cold turkey.

http://survivinganti...e__gopid__37123

#15 gruvedaddy

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 07:40 AM

Hello again all. :) I figured i'd add my two cents here and mention something that has worked for me. I have many times taken a hot bath while listening to relaxing "Spa" type music. I have an internet radio app on my smartphone called "Slacker Radio" (identical to Pandora) that has a station titled "Spa" which has nothing but relaxing music that makes the bath all the more enjoyable. It really helpes calm my mind while in the tub. I've even listened to it while driving home from work after a hard day to calm my mind. If you don't have a smartphone i'm betting that there are a plentiful amount of cd's available that will serve the same purpose. Oh, and since Slacker is an internet radio service it is easily accessed via any computer at slacker.com. You'll find "Spa" in the category of "Chill" stations. Give it a listen, it's FREE and very soothing. :)
25mg Zoloft (down from 150mg over 13 years), 1mg Ativan

#16 Altostrata

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 11:06 AM

Sounds delightful, gruvedaddy, thanks!
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

#17 Nikki

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 06:40 AM

Alto thanks so much for posting these helpful sites. I just glanced at the first one. Will try to make time to review them all. I will try to tell other members about going thru these. Hugs and thanks :)

Intro: http://survivinganti...ndown-with-ads/

 

Paxil 1997-2004

Crossed over to Lexapro Paxil not available

at Pharmacies GSK halted deliveries

Lexapro 40mgs

Lexapro taper (2years)

Imipramine

Imipramine and Celexa

Now Nefazadone/Imipramine 50mgs. each

45mgs. Serzone  50mgs. Imipramine


#18 Altostrata

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:14 AM

You're welcome, Nikki. Let us know what works for you.
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

#19 Catalyzt

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:32 PM

Great topic and posts, not much to add, only a slightly different spin on what y'all already have observed: Group therapy worked really well for me for PSSD (and the comparisons upthread to Bill W & AA are particularly well taken in this respect.) Attachment is the best way of regulating affect and restoring some kind of homeostasis to my brain-- whether the disregulation is chemical, environmental, pharmacological or some combination of the above. What goes along with this, though, is developing an aggressive strategy for attacking shame and self-blame, and that's much harder. You can't get to group or call a friend if you can't get out of bed, or are too depressed to do anything because you think you did something wrong. This is distorted thinking, and it's really seductive. I am now deep into Healy's "Let Them Eat Prozac," and one thing he noted in a very small study with subjects who were not clinically depressed was that one side effect of SSRIs is that we start believing we are defective. Even scientists and medical professionals who knew, intellectually, that SSRIs might cause suicidal ideation or severe side effects that were not reported in the literature began believing that intrusive thoughts caused by the drugs-- or their withdrawal-- were somehow the result of some underlying psychological problem they had not recognized before. AND they were sometimes resistant to discontinuing the drugs, even though they knew, intellectually, that this was irrational. This is why, on a bad day, you have to make yourself call friends, or get out to group or some kind of social activity even if you do not feel like it. It almost may not even matter exactly which group you choose. Pick one and go for it. Again this is nothing that has not been said already, just a slightly different way of thinking about it that might be helpful. --Cat

#20 Narcissus

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 09:32 AM

Hi. How I am using what I've learned in MBCT is this: on days when I feel low (which happens all too frequently still/always) I remind myself to feel what I am feeling and to let my thoughts go by like clouds. I get so caught up in telling myself a story about why I feel this way and try to analyze it, understand it and I get all wrapped up and tied up in the story and the story is usually negative and totally unhelpful. These are old, familiar feelings even though they are so negative and painful; it is easy to stay in their story but I try to focus on the feeling in my body (usually in my gut) and just let the thoughts go. Also I try to stay in the present and focus on my breath. I am not always successful and I find my mood is okay for a couple of days and then very blue for a couple of days. I also try to "radically accept" that this is how it is for me, at this time anyhow. Sometimes that helps. In the past, aside from being on ads, I would analyze my thoughts and feelings and end up more tangled up. Hope this makes sense to you reading this; it isn't absolutely clear to me how this all works. All I know for sure is that I have to use these tools every day; I will never get over these issues but I do have ways to deal with them. It also helps to do things I enjoy for their own sake and, as I learned from so many of you over the months, to be gentle and kind to myself.


Yes! This is all spot on.
3 Years 150 mgs Effexor
2 month taper down to zero
3 terrible weeks at zero
Back up to 75 mgs
2 months at 75
6 or so months back to regular dose of 150 - was able to restabilize fine.
3 month taper back to zero
1 HORRENDOUS week at zero
2 days back up to 37.5
3 days back up to 75
One week at 150 - unable to stabilize.
Back down to 75 mgs
At 75 mgs (half original dose) and suffering withdrawal symptoms since October 2012.

"It is a radical cure for all pessimism to become ill, to remain ill for a good while, and then grow well for a still longer period." - Nietzsche

#21 Narcissus

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 09:34 AM

This is distorted thinking, and it's really seductive.


Seductive is a good word for it.
3 Years 150 mgs Effexor
2 month taper down to zero
3 terrible weeks at zero
Back up to 75 mgs
2 months at 75
6 or so months back to regular dose of 150 - was able to restabilize fine.
3 month taper back to zero
1 HORRENDOUS week at zero
2 days back up to 37.5
3 days back up to 75
One week at 150 - unable to stabilize.
Back down to 75 mgs
At 75 mgs (half original dose) and suffering withdrawal symptoms since October 2012.

"It is a radical cure for all pessimism to become ill, to remain ill for a good while, and then grow well for a still longer period." - Nietzsche

#22 keepingon

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:06 AM

Hello there, Read your story---and must say that some years ago i analyzed every thing and then found out that at the end of the day analysing does not help to solve any issues--It actually causes more issues. when ever I found self analysing I would say out loud "Not you again" your analysis does not work. I have learned not to analyse, but take things in my stride one day at a time. Not saying you must do it....If you feel comfortable with it and whatever works for you great. Just sharing Keep on keeping on

#23 Lilu

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 02:23 PM

Hi. I just finished an 8 week course called Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy which I have found very helpful when I take the time and energy to use what I have learned. Jon Kabat-Zinn has written a good book about it called the Mindful Way Through Depression. It is a combination of meditation and cognitive therapy which focusses on being in the present moment, seeing thoughts as untrue no matter how true they may seem and focussing on your feelings (bodily) instead. It is very helpful in times of oncoming depression, anxiety etc. I don't know how effective it would be just to read the book; the support and interaction with the other participants and, of course, the teacher, was very important to me and the others in the class. This may be the first time I have offered something positive to this site in the 8 months I have been visiting. So, even though I still have very down times, there is hope.

Where did you find this class?


2005-2008 Effexor xr; 1/2008 Tapered 3 months, then quit.
7/2008-2009 Reinstated Effexor xr due to crying spells.
2009-3/2013 Switched to Pristiq 50 mg then 100 mg
3/2013 Switched to Lexapro 10mg. Cut down to 5 mg. CT for 2 weeks then reinstated for 6 weeks
8/2013-8/2014 Tapering Lexapro
11/2014 -8/2015: Developed severe insomnia, resumed using Ambien & Klonopin
12/2014-6/2015 Tried Ativan, Lunesta, Sonata, Trazadone, Seroquel, Rameron - Adverse Reactions
7/2015 Reinstated Lexapro at 2 mg; Quit Klonopin CT suddenly paradoxical)
Started Gabapentin 100-300 mg for 3 weeks. Developed severe lumbar jerking movements (myoclonus).Quit Gabapentin CT.
8/2015 Continuing Lexapro 2 mg. Baclofen 10mg-AM/20mg-PM - tapered off by 5/2016
1-7/2016 Lexapro 5 mg 
Intro page: http://survivinganti...rsened-by-meds/


#24 Sarabellum

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 05:16 PM

I would be interested in the Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy, too.

 

As a side note, for those in the Louisville, KY area, the University of Louisville has an ongoing study involving CBT. It is free to volunteers.

 

You can read more about the research here: https://louisville.e...ession/research


1991-1992: 25mg Zoloft (initially for post-partum depression - 6 weeks after giving birth)

1994-1998: 25mg Zoloft (post-partum again - 6 weeks after subsequent birth)

2003-2011: 30mg Cymbalta (situational depression - began tapering off in November 2011 - completely off in November 2012)

2012-2013: 25mg Zoloft (used to "cushion the blow" for withdrawal from Cymbalta)

2014: - Estradiol (slow increases as follows) .5 mg: Jan - Feb, 1 mg: Mar - Apr, 1.5 mg: May - Jun, 2 mg: Jun.

2014 - July 20 100 mg Buproprion 1 x a day.

133 mg chelated magnesium 3x per day, Carlson fish oil daily: 1600 EPA, 1000 DHA

- completely medication free as of July 1, 2013

- previous bouts with brain zaps and tremors

- continual struggles with anxiety, panic attacks, disassociation, anger, etc.


#25 pdtrtr

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 01:44 PM

Hi all,

The only thing that helped me so far is changing objects, habits, friends and environment gradually.  I think change faciliates formation of new connections and thus healing.  Throwing or donating stuff at home I don't need or bought for no good reason was little helpful.  Freeing myself from things, places or people that irritate me makes me feel less bad.   Changing habits or even buying new things instead of the ones I gave away could be helpful.    Otherwise the symptoms are cruel and tend to get worse by time for me regardless of how much time I work, exercise or what I eat.

Hope you get well soon. 



#26 Newbeginning

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 12:25 AM

Some things that have helped me:

 

1-This book is awesome, written by a therapist who suffers chronic/recurrent depression. You can tell he has lived it and he helps you understand a lot of the underlying issues and start addressing them: http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/1455884898

 

Highly recommended. Can buy used on Amazon for $4.

 

2-Dialectic Behavioral Therapy (DBT): Initially created for people with Borderline Personality Disorder, it is now used as a set of skills that can be used by anyone who wants to regulate their emotions better. It mixes cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based therapies.

 

There is an awesome Yahoo! group where you learn the emotional regulation skills and do homework every week. Then you receive feedback from the moderators and read what other people share from their own homework. It's a cycle of several; weeks. Since these skills need a lot of practice, you can repeat the cycle as many times as you want.

 

It's all by e-mail. You can remain anonymous. Here's the link to apply to the group: https://groups.yahoo...s/dbtclass/info

 

3-Fish oil:I hope I'm not being repetitive, as I have not finished reading the fish oil thread yet. The main thing with fish oil is 1) DHA/EPA concentration; and 2) taking a quality supplement.

 

I got no results from two brands of capsules. The only thing that worked for me is the liquid one. You have to take 1 tablespoon a day for 2 months before you notice an effect. This is the one I used, and the only one I found effective: http://www.iherb.com...-oz-500-ml/2796

 

Make sure you buy it from someone who carries fresh inventory, keeps stock in climate-controlled storage and ships fast, because fish oil can oxidize quickly when exposed to heat or light. The amber colored bottle protects some, but it's not good to risk it. Iherb is a good company to buy from. Also, keep it in the fridge and buy one bottle at a time to minimize risk of oxidation.

 

It tastes ok (lemony) and can even be added to salads. Just make sure you eat it all :)

 

4-Mentoring: I found someone on the web that has had similar experiences with depression and we exchange e-mails often and check on each other. This is different than an online forum or support group in that you get a more on-on-one type of relationship with someone who is very much going through the process of recovery at the same time as you are. I didn't realize how helpful it would be. I found her at a depression suppoprt group and she's helped me through more than one crisis.

 

I'm blessed with a caring family and a couple of close friends, but sometimes you really need someone who has been exactly where you have been.

 

5-Gardening and pets: it's like meditation. You get engaged in an activity that brings you joy without any expectations of performance. It's an easy way to get immersed in the moment and have contact with nature. With pets there is also unconditional love and acceptance.

 

6-6-8 deep breaths several times a day, even when I'm not stressed help me be less stessed overall. It's hard to keep doing regularly, but even if you just do it sometimes, it helps. When you're faced with increased stress, it becomes more natural and easier to self-regulate your stress response with deep breathing and induce relaxation.

 

7-Have a regular "no cares" time when you literally allow yourself not to give a fu** about anything. Nothing.

 

8-For anxiety and rumination, the "worry time exercise" is helpful to decrease overall anxiety. Instructions: http://www.anxieties...me#.Uy6Y2oXLL2Q

 

You can do one 30 minute session instead of 2 10-minute ones. You can also write down your worries throughout the day, as long as you don't allow yourself to worry about them until worry time.

 

9-If you can exercise, even just go out for a walk, by all means do it. It helps the brain work better in every way.

 

10-Hope: it may sound strange, since hopelesness is such a core part of the problem we faced. Still, hope is a choice. It's a choice that increases the odds of better outcomes (this has been researched ad nauseum). And we lose nothing by leaving a little window open to hope.

 

Hope some of it helps!


  • SSRIs 3-4 times in the last 14 years; would take them for 6-8 months and then taper off under dr supervision with no problems.
  • Med history prior to 2015: http://survivinganti...313#entry267313
  • 04/2015: Prozac decreased to 15mg over last 3 months; effexor held steady at 8mg; current effexor XR: 20 beads of a 75mg capsule per day (about 8mg)
  • 06/2015: Prozac: 10mg; effexor XR: 19 beads (about 7.5mg); 07/2015: Prozac: 8.5mg; effexor 18 beads; 08/2015: Prozac: 7.5mg; effexor: 17 beads
  • End of August: withdrawal: depressive symptoms, crying spells. Realized I was measuring prozac dose wrong for the last 2 months. Reinstated Prozac 8.5mg; Kept effexor at 17 beads. Stabilized in 5 weeks.
  • 10/2015: Prozac: 8.5mg; effexor: 17 beads
  • 11/2015: Prozac: 1.9ml (7.5mg); effexor: 16 beads
  • 12/2015: Prozac: 1.6ml; effexor xr: 16 beads. Withdrawal: neuroemotions
  • 01/2016: prozac: 1.6ml; effexor xr: reinstated 17 beads, withdrawal improved; 02/2016: Prozac 1.5ml; Effexor: 17 beads; 03/2016: Prozac 1.3ml(5mg); Effexor: 17 beads (7mg)-withdrawal (flu-like malaise, lightheaded, drowsy) started end of March. April 15: reinstated Prozac 1.5ml. Stabilized. 2 weeks ok. End of April: Withdrawal (neuroemotions). Eventually stabilized in April-May. Apathy improved.
  • 3 month hold until August. August 2016: apathy came back;

  • October 2016: updosed to Prozac 1.6ml. Bad reaction: anxiety, depression. End of October: went down Prozac 1.5ml. Stabilized over several weeks.

  • Dec 9: tried macca for energy: anxiety/depression. Improved over several weeks, but not completely resolved.

  • Dec 31: cut Effexor 5% to 16 beads. After 9 days: withdrawal anxiety, depression

     


#27 Altostrata

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 09:38 AM

Thank you for the excellent tips, Newbeginning.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.

#28 milkandmarble

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 04:48 PM

I'm not sure if this is the correct place for this (feel free to move it), but I wanted to share a tool that I've been using the last few weeks to help me manage my health and moods. It is a free application available for computers or phones, etc. that helps you track your symptoms, triggers, etc. in order to identify what is helping/ hurting. You can download it for free here:

http://www.findingoptimism.com

 

The other resource I have really found fascinating is a book I got from the library called Cracked: The Unhappy Truth about Psychiatry by James Davies. The 13th chapter (how to fix the cracks) was especially interesting for its take on the relationship between mental health and our society.

 

 


Medication History

First major depressive episode in 2001.

Prescribed 10mg Celexa. Fluctuated between 10-40 mgs over the next 13 years until the present (June 2014). 

Tried 3 times during first 8 years to go off Celexa with dramatic results: severe depressive "relapse", loss of all social functioning.

In March 2014, after prolonged "postpartum depression" my new GP added 150 mg Wellbutrin to the mix.

 

Taper progress:

decided to start tapering down from 40mg  (had only recently increased from 30mg) Celexa & 150mg Wellbutrin

June 11, 2014 tapered to 35 mg Celexa 150 mg Wellbutrin

July 1, 2014 tapered to 30 mg Celexa (20mg brand name + 10mg citalopram) (trying to move to brand name Celexa exclusively) 150 mg Wellbutrin

Aug 5, 2014 tapered to 25 mg Celexa (20 brand + 5 cital) 150 mg Wellbutrin

Aug 20, 2014 tapered to 23 mg Celexa (20 brand + 3 liquid cital) 150 mg Wellbutrin - added 2 x omegas (total 750mg EPA 500mg DHA + 1000IU D3)


#29 mammaP

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 03:47 AM

I came across this site today and it is very interesting. How writing about feelings is as good as talking.

People who talk about traumas and grief recover faster than those who keep it inside, and writing can be a good outlet

too. http://www.bakadesuy... The Wrong Tree


**I am not a medical professional, if in doubt please consult a doctor with withdrawal knowledge.

 

See how to create a signature here http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/12364-please-put-your-withdrawal-history-in-your-signature/

 

Many drugs for many years, prescribed diazepam first 1973, took occasionally. 3 or 4 tricyclics  for short periods.

1993 had a breakdown leading to 10 years of drug experiments with all classes of psych drugs.

2002  effexor. 

Tapered by counting beads from March 2012 to March 2013, ending with 5 beads.

Withdrawal April 2013 . Reinstated 5 beads reduced to 4 beads May 2013

Restarted taper  Nov 2013  

OFF EFFEXOR Feb 2015    :D 

 

Also tapered atenolol and omeprazole Dec 2013 - May 2014

 

Tapering tramadol, Feb 2015 100mg , March 2015 50mg -hold- Feb2016 46mg  March 8 2016 45 April 44mg  May 11  43mg June 14 42mg

Taking fish oil, magnesium, pro biotic.

 

My story http://survivinganti...king-in/page-33

 

Lesson learned, slow down taper at lower doses. Taper no more than 10% of CURRENT dose if possible

 

Following every sunset is a brand new day


#30 chia1214

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 12:56 PM

I'm not sure if this is the correct place for this (feel free to move it), but I wanted to share a tool that I've been using the last few weeks to help me manage my health and moods. It is a free application available for computers or phones, etc. that helps you track your symptoms, triggers, etc. in order to identify what is helping/ hurting. You can download it for free here:

http://www.findingoptimism.com

 

The other resource I have really found fascinating is a book I got from the library called Cracked: The Unhappy Truth about Psychiatry by James Davies. The 13th chapter (how to fix the cracks) was especially interesting for its take on the relationship between mental health and our society.

Hi - I'm new on this forum and just came upon your post here. Your link to the online tracker was exactly what I was hoping for, didn't expect to find something so tailor made and customizable too. I know yours is an older post, but wanted to thank you for sharing that link. Hope your taper and life are going well. This site has been so helpful to me, so much valuable information.


Read my intro here: http://survivinganti...er/#entry110043

1975 Hospitalized and first exposure to psych. drugs age 13-15 Haldol, Tofranil, Cogentin, Thorazine. On and off numerous AD’s & AP’s no records until 2000

2000 Celexa, Clonazepam 1mg – never exceeded 1 mg except occasional emergency use

2004 Lamictal (Lamotrigine), Effexor, recall add-on trials of Lexapro, Prozac, Wellbutrin during this time also

2007 Lithium added, switch Effexor to Pristiq, still on Lamictal (Lamotrigine) Clonazepam. Some cold turkey quits of everything over the years. No knowledge of WD

2011 Lithuim Gabapentin Lunestra, Lamictal (Lamotrigine), Clonazepam

2012 Taken off all but Lamictal (Lamotrigine), Clonazepam, began Zyprexa

2013 Abilify replaced Zyprexa (high lipids) added Wellbutrin, Prozac, Adderall

2014 Discontinued Abilify, Wellbutrin, Prozac, Adderall, added Latuda, Quetiapine, then stopped those.

December 2014 Found SA Began slow water taper of the only remaining two drugs I'm taking - Lamictal (Lamotrigine) 200mg & Clonazepam 1mg

Current Dose: Lamictal (Lamotrigine) 150mg     Clonazepam 0.20mg  January 25, 2017


#31 moodyblues78

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Posted 03 January 2015 - 05:10 PM

Whenever you see yourself in the mirror, smile. Do it every time for months no matter how sh*tty you feel. Even if you are crying your eyes out.

You'll surprised how much it changes the way you see yourself.

08 Cipralex 10mg for about 6 months. 11-12 Cipralex 20mg. Unsuccesful WD. 12-13 Zoloft 100mg with Diazepam 10-20mg as needed for anxiety.
Fall 13 Tapering Zoloft 100->50->25->12,5->0 in 2,5 months and CT Diazepam. 12/24/13 RI Zoloft 12,5mg
.

1/21/14 11mg

3/18/14 9,9mg

2/18/14 8mg

4/22/14 7,6mg

5/5/14 7,2mg

5/12/14 -> cutting 0,5mg per week, holding when necessary.

8/18/14 -> cutting 0,25mg per week holding when necessary.

10/20/2014 -> cutting 0,1mg per week, holding when necessary.
12/28/2014 Jump!


#32 Nicoleflys

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 08:44 AM

Whenever you see yourself in the mirror, smile. Do it every time for months no matter how sh*tty you feel. Even if you are crying your eyes out.

You'll surprised how much it changes the way you see yourself.


Mind over matter. Self-affirmations work! Great post

I entered the world of Psych drugs in 1994 ,after the birth of my first child, having been diagnosed with post-partum depression.

I have been prescribed Zoloft, Prozac, and Lexapro for depression over the years, but Prozac 20mg has been a steady.

I also have been prescribed almost all of the mood stabilizers but found the weight gain intolerable so I never took them for more than a few months at a time.

I was prescribed Xanax shortly after the anti-depressants in 94. I took Xanax for almost 10 years. I was then switched to Clonopin with a dose ranging from .5mg 3xs daily up to 1mg 3xs daily.

I currently take clonazepam 1 mg prn.

 


#33 westcoast

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Posted 13 March 2015 - 02:20 PM

I came here just now thinking we need a thread like this, and here it is.

Supplements can only do so much. In the end it is up to us to start doing the things we used to enjoy, or used to benefit from.

Are there people who have good exercise programs, who could tell me how they got started? What got them off the couch...

It must be a big part of recovery and health. I was athletic until my mid-20s and can't quite motivate to resume. I was on a team and had a bicycling buddy in youth. The socializing was half the fun. Come to think of it I have been adding pounds since then, and never thought about how active I used to be. I thought it was just aging.

2009: Cancer hospital said I had adjustment disorder because I thought they were doing it wrong. Their headshrinker prescribed Effexor, and my life set on a new course. I didn't know what was ahead, like a passenger on Disneyland's Matterhorn, smiling and waving as it climbs...clink, clink, clink.

2010: Post surgical accidental Effexor discontinuation by nurses, masked by intravenous Dilaudid. (The car is balanced at the top of the track.) I get home, pop a Vicodin, and ...

Whooosh...down, down, down, down, down...goes the trajectory of my life, up goes my mood and tendency to think everything is a good idea.
2012: After the bipolar jig was up, now a walking bag of unrelated symptoms, I went crazy on Daytrana (the Ritalin skin patch by Noven), because ADHD was a perfect fit for a bag of unrelated symptoms. I was prescribed Effexor for the nervousness of it, and things got neurological. An EEG showed enough activity to warrant an epilepsy diagnosis rather than non-epileptic ("psychogenic") seizures.

:o 2013-2014: Quit everything and got worse. I probably went through DAWS: dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome. I drank to not feel, but I felt a lot: dread, fear, regret, grief: an utter sense of total loss of everything worth breathing about, for almost two years.

I was not suicidal but I wanted to be dead, at least dead to the experience of my own brain and body.

2015: I  began to recover after adding virgin coconut oil and organic grass-fed fed butter to a cup of instant coffee in the morning.

I did it hoping for mental acuity and better memory. After ten days of that, I was much better, mood-wise. Approximately neutral.

And, I experienced drowsiness. I could sleep. Not exactly happy, I did 30 days on Wellbutrin, because it had done me no harm in the past. 

I don't have the DAWS mood or state of mind. It never feel like doing anything if it means standing up.

In fact, I don't especially like moving. I'm a brain with a beanbag body.   :unsure:


#34 westcoast

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Posted 13 March 2015 - 02:22 PM

I came across this site today and it is very interesting. How writing about feelings is as good as talking.
People who talk about traumas and grief recover faster than those who keep it inside, and writing can be a good outlet
too. http://www.bakadesuy... The Wrong Tree


I wonder if posting on sites like this one is considered talking, or writing? Seems like a hybrid.

2009: Cancer hospital said I had adjustment disorder because I thought they were doing it wrong. Their headshrinker prescribed Effexor, and my life set on a new course. I didn't know what was ahead, like a passenger on Disneyland's Matterhorn, smiling and waving as it climbs...clink, clink, clink.

2010: Post surgical accidental Effexor discontinuation by nurses, masked by intravenous Dilaudid. (The car is balanced at the top of the track.) I get home, pop a Vicodin, and ...

Whooosh...down, down, down, down, down...goes the trajectory of my life, up goes my mood and tendency to think everything is a good idea.
2012: After the bipolar jig was up, now a walking bag of unrelated symptoms, I went crazy on Daytrana (the Ritalin skin patch by Noven), because ADHD was a perfect fit for a bag of unrelated symptoms. I was prescribed Effexor for the nervousness of it, and things got neurological. An EEG showed enough activity to warrant an epilepsy diagnosis rather than non-epileptic ("psychogenic") seizures.

:o 2013-2014: Quit everything and got worse. I probably went through DAWS: dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome. I drank to not feel, but I felt a lot: dread, fear, regret, grief: an utter sense of total loss of everything worth breathing about, for almost two years.

I was not suicidal but I wanted to be dead, at least dead to the experience of my own brain and body.

2015: I  began to recover after adding virgin coconut oil and organic grass-fed fed butter to a cup of instant coffee in the morning.

I did it hoping for mental acuity and better memory. After ten days of that, I was much better, mood-wise. Approximately neutral.

And, I experienced drowsiness. I could sleep. Not exactly happy, I did 30 days on Wellbutrin, because it had done me no harm in the past. 

I don't have the DAWS mood or state of mind. It never feel like doing anything if it means standing up.

In fact, I don't especially like moving. I'm a brain with a beanbag body.   :unsure:


#35 mammaP

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 12:06 PM

 

I came across this site today and it is very interesting. How writing about feelings is as good as talking.
People who talk about traumas and grief recover faster than those who keep it inside, and writing can be a good outlet
too. http://www.bakadesuy... The Wrong Tree


I wonder if posting on sites like this one is considered talking, or writing? Seems like a hybrid.

 

I think writing on here has helped me lots. I don't really think it matters where you write personally but it's the engagement that is good. It helps to put things into perspective. I kept diaries sporadically and let everything out onto the pages. I wrote letters too, to people who had hurt me but never posted them, just wrote them then burned them. I remember one to my dad, the feeling of the flames eating it up were liberating. That was when I let the abuse go. Didn't forget, you never forget, but writing that letter and burning it let it all go. I keep buying notebooks to write in but since the internet and especially since this forum I don't write on paper any more but still get it out onto the screen. 

 

As for getting off the couch, I have used a timer for years! Watching tv  I get up when the ads come on, and do something. Anything as long as I am moving. I use the timer for cleaning, it is overwhelming when there is so much to do and zero energy or motivation but setting the timer for just 5 minutes means something gets done, and often it is just what is needed to get going and the 5 minutes turns to 10 , 15 etc. I don't stop until the timer goes off but allow myself to stop once the time is up. If I'm up to it I do 5 minutes in each room, if I didn't do it this way nothing would ever get done! 


**I am not a medical professional, if in doubt please consult a doctor with withdrawal knowledge.

 

See how to create a signature here http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/12364-please-put-your-withdrawal-history-in-your-signature/

 

Many drugs for many years, prescribed diazepam first 1973, took occasionally. 3 or 4 tricyclics  for short periods.

1993 had a breakdown leading to 10 years of drug experiments with all classes of psych drugs.

2002  effexor. 

Tapered by counting beads from March 2012 to March 2013, ending with 5 beads.

Withdrawal April 2013 . Reinstated 5 beads reduced to 4 beads May 2013

Restarted taper  Nov 2013  

OFF EFFEXOR Feb 2015    :D 

 

Also tapered atenolol and omeprazole Dec 2013 - May 2014

 

Tapering tramadol, Feb 2015 100mg , March 2015 50mg -hold- Feb2016 46mg  March 8 2016 45 April 44mg  May 11  43mg June 14 42mg

Taking fish oil, magnesium, pro biotic.

 

My story http://survivinganti...king-in/page-33

 

Lesson learned, slow down taper at lower doses. Taper no more than 10% of CURRENT dose if possible

 

Following every sunset is a brand new day


#36 westcoast

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 12:39 PM

What a great tip, MP. (The timer). It addresses the feeling that sometimes keeps me from starting a chore: this will take forever and I will never finish. Having the timer means you do not have to finish...you just have to start.

 

I guess the same thing could work for people like me who cannot make themselves go for a walk. Just set your phone's timer to something ridiculous like 5 minutes, at which time you can turn around and go home if you want to. (Chances are you will not want to, though.)

 

One day at a time, anyway...I get my walking, such as it is, by parking in the far reach of parking lots and at least walking 20 yards twice :)


2009: Cancer hospital said I had adjustment disorder because I thought they were doing it wrong. Their headshrinker prescribed Effexor, and my life set on a new course. I didn't know what was ahead, like a passenger on Disneyland's Matterhorn, smiling and waving as it climbs...clink, clink, clink.

2010: Post surgical accidental Effexor discontinuation by nurses, masked by intravenous Dilaudid. (The car is balanced at the top of the track.) I get home, pop a Vicodin, and ...

Whooosh...down, down, down, down, down...goes the trajectory of my life, up goes my mood and tendency to think everything is a good idea.
2012: After the bipolar jig was up, now a walking bag of unrelated symptoms, I went crazy on Daytrana (the Ritalin skin patch by Noven), because ADHD was a perfect fit for a bag of unrelated symptoms. I was prescribed Effexor for the nervousness of it, and things got neurological. An EEG showed enough activity to warrant an epilepsy diagnosis rather than non-epileptic ("psychogenic") seizures.

:o 2013-2014: Quit everything and got worse. I probably went through DAWS: dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome. I drank to not feel, but I felt a lot: dread, fear, regret, grief: an utter sense of total loss of everything worth breathing about, for almost two years.

I was not suicidal but I wanted to be dead, at least dead to the experience of my own brain and body.

2015: I  began to recover after adding virgin coconut oil and organic grass-fed fed butter to a cup of instant coffee in the morning.

I did it hoping for mental acuity and better memory. After ten days of that, I was much better, mood-wise. Approximately neutral.

And, I experienced drowsiness. I could sleep. Not exactly happy, I did 30 days on Wellbutrin, because it had done me no harm in the past. 

I don't have the DAWS mood or state of mind. It never feel like doing anything if it means standing up.

In fact, I don't especially like moving. I'm a brain with a beanbag body.   :unsure: