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Vitamin B12 -- essential for mood, nervous system

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Aka cobalamin

 

Among people seeking treatment for mood disorders, there may be a lot of undiagnosed subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency.

 

B12 is stored in the liver and used up in various metabolic transactions, particularly stress. It helps clean out toxins, homocysteine, and repair nerve cells.

 

As we age, our bodies absorb B12 poorly. But it's not just seniors who might have low B12! Anyone taking a stomach acid blocker is also blocking B12 absorption. Older people taking stomach acid blockers are doubly at risk for low B12.

 

Since B12 is generally found in animal products, vegetarians sometimes have difficulty getting enough. There are other factors that might cause B12 levels to be low, but show up as normal on regular blood tests -- that's why it's called subclinical B12 deficiency.

 

Subclinical B12 deficiency may cause low mood for which many people might seek an antidepressant. Many psychiatric symptoms may very well be just low B12.

 

Over the long run, subclinical B12 deficiency can be as destructive as frank B12 deficiency.

 

Researchers believe that a lot of people who have been institutionalized for dementia or Alzheimer's actually had longstanding subclinical B12 deficiency; low B12 is very common among people who have been diagnosed (or misdiagnosed) with Alzheimer's.

 

Here's a recent post from Dr. Andrew Weil's blog about the neurological effects of low B12:

 

Vitamin B12 and Senior Moments

 

As we get older, our bodies don’t absorb vitamin B12 as readily as they did during our younger years (B12 is found in animal foods - meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy products). And this decreasing absorption may help explain why brain size shrinks with age and seniors develop problems with thinking. Researchers in Chicago checked blood levels of B12 in 121 seniors taking part in the Chicago Health and Aging Project. The investigators also measured vitamin B12 in five metabolites that are considered markers for B12 activity; a protocol, which they said, could give a fuller picture of B12 status. The seniors were asked to complete 17 tests to assess their memory and thinking skills. More than four years later, the study participants underwent MRIs to measure brain volume and to look for other signs of brain atrophy. The research team found that low levels of B12 in the metabolites were associated with poorer thinking skills and smaller brain volume. Because the study was a small one, the investigators said their results must be confirmed by additional research, and cautioned against making dietary changes based on their results. The study was published in the September 27 issues of Neurology.

 

My take? It is interesting that these researchers concluded that testing B12 levels in the blood isn’t enough to assess its activity in the body, but this is not the first study to associate low levels of B12 with negative changes in brain anatomy and function. A study published in 2008 suggested that seniors with the highest levels of B12 were six times less likely to exhibit brain atrophy than participants whose B12 levels were lower....."

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How to take B12

 

If you have normal B12 metabolism and get lots of B12 through eating animal proteins (there's no other way to get it), you may not need B12 supplementation.

 

If you are feeling run down, are stressed, of a certain age, or are not eating well, you may need B12 and you might as well take some to be on the safe side. It's cheap and you can't overdose, excess just goes out in your urine.

 

Caution: Some people whose nervous systems have been sensitized by withdrawal find B12 too activating. If you suspect B12 deficiency, it's probably best to have a B12 shot before you start to taper, while your nervous system is still stable.

 

There are three ways to take B12: Through shots, sublingual (under the tongue) tablets, or regular tablets. The shots and sublingual tablets are most effective.

 

If you have withdrawal symptoms, you might want to try a very small amount of vitamin B12 sublingual first, perhaps a quarter of a 1000mcg tablet, then take it daily if it works with your system.

 

Of 1000mcg/day of sublingual B12, a tiny amount, perhaps 10mcg is absorbed by the mouth mucosa. This bypasses any absorption problems that might exist in the small intestine.

 

The most common form of B12 is cyanocobalamin, which releases cyanide atoms into your system as it is metabolised. It is unknown what this does, but there are safer forms of B12.

 

To avoid the cyanide, methylcobalamin is a better form to take by mouth and hydroxocobalamin by injection.

 

I apparently had low B12 when I went off Paxil, and B12 (hydroxycobalamin) shots helped me a lot in the first year of severe discontinuation syndrome. I started taking them in month 10 and I wish I had found out about it earlier.

 

I happened to be taking Zantac for two years while I was taking Paxil, and I suspect that caused a subclinical B12 deficiency, along with my being an older person.

 

I started out with B12 shots. They gave me a warm, tingling, relaxing feeling all over my body and relieved, to some extent, some of my withdrawal symptoms. I gave myself a 1000mcg shot every week for many months. I was probably very low in B12.

 

I've taken a B12 supplement in one form or another ever since.

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How vitamin B12 gets depleted

 

B12 is mostly absorbed in the small intestine.

 

B12 deficiency can be instigated by taking drugs that block the absorption of B12 in the gut, such as antibiotics; tetracycline; "acid blockers" omeprazole, lansoprazole, ranitidine, cimetidine, or antacids that are often used to treat gastroesophageal reflux; chemotherapy; metformin for diabetes; phenobarbital; and phenytoin (see Drugs that Deplete: Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)).

 

The body stores a three- to five-year supply of B12 in the liver and in normal people deficiencies take a long time to develop. When shortages do occur, they are often due to a lack of intrinsic factor, an enzyme that allows vitamin B12 to be absorbed in the intestinal tract. Intrinsic factor diminishes with age and older people are more prone to B12 deficiencies.

 

Vegetarians are prone to B12 deficiency because B12 has to come from animal-based foods (an indication humans are naturally omnivorous).

 

Stress, such as that of antidepressant discontinuation, can significantly deplete B12 as it is used up in the catecholamine cycle in the production of stress hormones.

 

Stomach disease can cause B12 deficiency.

 

Some people have a genetically determined inability to absorb B12 in the small intestine. Because vitamin B12 is important to red blood cell formation, extreme deficiency leads to an oxygen-transport problem known as pernicious anemia.

 

Pernicious anemia can cause mood swings, paranoia, irritability, confusion, dementia, hallucinations, or mania, eventually followed by appetite loss, dizziness, weakness, shortage of breath, heart palpitations, diarrhea, and tingling sensations in the extremities.

 

(If you have this, you will have had other long-term health problems.) See http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000569.htm:

 

"...Risk factors include a family history of pernicious anemia, Scandinavian or Northern European descent, and a history of autoimmune endocrine disorders. Pernicious anemia is seen in association with some autoimmune endocrine diseases such as type 1 diabetes, hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, hypopituitarism, testicular dysfunction, Graves disease, chronic thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, secondary amenorrhea, and vitiligo...."

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Diagnosis of subclinical B12 deficiency

 

Low B12 may not show up in a normal blood test. It may be circulating in the blood because it's not being properly absorbed in the gut.

 

(If you have subclinical B12 deficiency, your red blood cells may enlarge. I believe this gives you a high volume of red blood cells, which makes the serum B12 number meaningless. The red blood cells also have trouble carrying oxygen.)

 

B12 deficiency can be "subclinical," meaning blood tests are normal, and still be very serious. In its extreme state, B12 deficiency is anemia. Symptoms of subclinical B12 deficiency include leg aches and pains, confusion, depression, anxiety, tiredness.

 

The following tests screen for subclinical B12 deficiency: measurement of serum methylmalonic acid, homocysteine levels, and holotranscobalamin II (holoTC) (see citations below). (However, B12 shots or sublingual tablets are a lot cheaper than these tests and if your nervous system is stable, have very little risk.)

 

------------------

Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 1997;12:67-72

Plasma methylmalonic acid in relation to serum cobalamin and plasma homocysteine in a psychogeriatric population and the effect of cobalamin treatment.

Nilsson K, Gustafson L, Faldt R, et al.

 

------------------

http://jnnp.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/69/2/228

 

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2000;69:228-232 (August)

Homocysteine, folate, methylation, and monoamine

metabolism in depression

Teodoro Bottiglieria, Malcolm Laundya, Richard

Crellinb, Brian K Tooneb, Michael W P Carneyc, Edward

H Reynoldsa

 

-------------------

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2339679&dopt=Citation

 

Am J Hematol. 1990 Jun;34(2):132-9.

Low holotranscobalamin II is the earliest serum marker

for subnormal vitamin B12 (cobalamin) absorption in

patients with AIDS.

Herbert V, Fong W, Gulle V, Stopler T.

 

-------------------

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=14656029&query_hl=7

 

Clin Chem Lab Med. 2003 Nov;41(11):1478-88.

Functional vitamin B12 deficiency and determination of

holotranscobalamin in populations at risk.

Herrmann W, Obeid R, Schorr H, Geisel J.

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Folate and B12

 

Ordinarily, folic acid (folate) works with vitamin B12 and they should be taken together. Deficiencies of either can lead to anemia or neurological symptoms, even dementia.

 

Folic acid can mask a B12 deficiency and vice versa, so it's wise to take them together and cover both bases.

 

However, folic acid can be stimulating for people with hypersensitive alerting systems, i.e. people with withdrawal syndrome.

 

If your nervous system can tolerate it, you might as well get your folate in a multivitamin supplement PLUS take additional B12. Multivitamins usually contain an insignificant amount of B12.

 

Low folate is also implicated in anemia and heart disease.

 

An integrative doctor recommended that I take a special type of folate, because she said I wasn't absorbing folate properly. I apparently inherited a genetic mutation (MTHF) that predisposes towards heart disease -- folate and B12 are important to maintain a healthy heart (and brain!!!) -- and faulty folate metabolism is part of that.

 

Metafolin, Deplin, or Metagenics FolaPro (l-5-methyl tetrahydrofolate or MTHF) are folate alternatives for people to take who cannot metabolize the usual form of folic acid in supplements. There is no reason to take a folate alternative if you don't have the MTHF mutation.

 

These folate alternatives are quite expensive, while ordinary B12 and folate supplements are very inexpensive.

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Of course, taking an antidepressant doesn't remedy a folate or B12 deficiency or any other kind of vitamin or mineral deficiency. So if your symptoms have been caused by this and you have been taking antidepressants for years, your vitamin or mineral deficiency has just been getting worse.

 

(There is no evidence that B12 or folate have any effect on serotonin.)

 

Low zinc is quite common and can lead to all kinds of awful symptoms.

 

Vitamin D has been found to be more and more important to general health. Deficiencies are common, particularly in cloudy climes in the winter. Supplementation up to 1200 IUs a day might also be a good idea. Vitamin D3 is the best form to take.

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Stress, such as that of antidepressant discontinuation, can significantly deplete B12 as it is used up in the catecholamine cycle in the production of stress hormones.

 

"...Risk factors include a family history of pernicious anemia, Scandinavian or Northern European descent, and a history of autoimmune endocrine disorders. Pernicious anemia is seen in association with some autoimmune endocrine diseases such as type 1 diabetes, hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, hypopituitarism, testicular dysfunction, Graves disease, chronic thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, secondary amenorrhea, and vitiligo...."

That's me. Thanks, Alto.

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You have a family history of pernicious anemia, Bar?

 

That could be a big part of your mood problem right there.

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Thanks Alto,

 

I wrote a post here many months ago about this and had a battery of blood tests done, as my doctor did not take me seriously,

that B12 could be related to the problems im having now, and was not prepared to listen when i tried to tell him, that this does not show up in the normal

battery of bloods the surgery offers.

 

Im printing this off and taking it with me, to see if he is prepared to listen now!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Great idea, angie.

 

If he doesn't listen, you might just get some sublingual B12 and take it. Occasionally people with withdrawal syndrome are hypersensitive to it, but other than that, it's quite safe.

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I've been taking Vit B 12 for around six months now, and could feel that I had more energy after about a week. I've been taking it in the pill form. I don't like the taste of vits or meds so no sublingual anything for me if I can avoid it.

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Great info Alto. I just ordered some in liquid for under the tongue. That way it'll be easy to try small amounts too. I hope it helps me. I pretty much have a vegetarian diet. I eat just a tiny bit of meat on occasion.

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Just wanted to caution: Some hypersensitized people find B12 too stimulating, try a fraction of a dose to begin with.

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"...Risk factors include a family history of pernicious anemia, Scandinavian or Northern European descent, and a history of autoimmune endocrine disorders. Pernicious anemia is seen in association with some autoimmune endocrine diseases such as type 1 diabetes, hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, hypopituitarism, testicular dysfunction, Graves disease, chronic thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, secondary amenorrhea, and vitiligo...."

That's me. Thanks, Alto.

 

Not sure how I missed your question about pernicious anemia, Alto.

 

I'm not aware of pernicious anemia, but several of the conditions listed are in my family or myself: Graves, Addison's, Hashimoto's thyroiditis*, diabetes (very borderline)*, vitiligo*, secondary amenorrhea*, AI antibodies*, dementia is a given in females on mother's side, which scares the cr** out of me. My sister and I used to refer to it as "the inevitable dingbattedness that runs in our family" but see it is now obvious dementia (unspecified, not Alzheimer's). Eastern European descent. Non-alcohol fatty liver disease (NAFLD) -diagnosed. Just throwing that in after reading the liver/B12 connection (but what is the liver NOT related to??)

Still suspect some pituitary and/or adrenal dysfunction.

* = self

Also MTHFR genetic mutation as discussed previously. Curious if B vitamin injections (vs oral) are handled differently by body with this mutation? (I feel like there's an obvious answer to that, but thinking is very foggy today). Very low mood this past week that is reminiscent of severe PMS that started in 40s although I've been without period for ~2 years. I attended a talk by a hormone doc years ago and recall him saying that even after periods cease (meno-pauses), women still experience PMS because hormones are still fluctuating some. (Audible groan from all in attendance - women and men!) *I'm not sure if that is true*

 

I've also taken a few of the drugs know to deplete B12: several antibiotics, birth control, and recently metformin although I've held off on that on some instinctual level (or plain fear of drugs). I find it interesting that those same drugs were on list of drugs associated with candidiasis.

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I have been reading about the different types of vitamin B12, and found this article to be very interesting. I ordered some of the methylcobalamin as a spray, and got it in the mail today. will let you know how things progress.

Here is a very interesting article:

 

http://www.psychiatrywithoutdrugs.co.uk/methylcobalamin.htm

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Thanks, Coleen.

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My psychiatrist told me to up my iron, and then upon buying the iron I was told to take it with B12, so I bought sublingual and my energy has improved substantially.  There is b12 deficiency in my family too.  I tried to ask for those special deficiency tests, but the psychiatrist said no, it's fine in my blood work so she wouldn't go further.  I would have liked to try the shots, but I don't know how to get them without a prescription, or a prescription without evidence of low b12 in the blood.  Any ideas?

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In the US, GPs would give the shots.

 

Absorption from sublinguals is fine, it's just slower than the shots.

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I need some advice.

 

I was recently to the doctor and after a blood test she said that I am low in iron and B12. She suggested me to take both supplements. I don't mind taking iron, but the 250mcg of B12 made me extremely anxious. I took only 2 pills and then I had to stop. I will go again to the doctor in a couple of weeks. What should I tell her? How can I take it, because I apparently need it, but without the anxiety, that is unbearable? 

 

I know, my question is not really related to withdrawal, but maybe somebody else had such an experience.

 

I had relatives with pernicious anemia, so this may happen to me too in the future, but for now I need to find a way to take some extra B12 without going crazy. Are the B12 shots better? Or they also will trigger the anxiety?

 

I am a couple of months off Paxil, I am ok for now, but I don't want to spoil the good progress I am making.

 

Maybe I should cut the B12 pill in small pieces, I have a lot of exercise in cutting pills.

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I need some advice.

 

I was recently to the doctor and after a blood test she said that I am low in iron and B12. She suggested me to take both supplements. I don't mind taking iron, but the 250mcg of B12 made me extremely anxious. I took only 2 pills and then I had to stop. I will go again to the doctor in a couple of weeks. What should I tell her? How can I take it, because I apparently need it, but without the anxiety, that is unbearable?

 

I know, my question is not really related to withdrawal, but maybe somebody else had such an experience.

 

I had relatives with pernicious anemia, so this may happen to me too in the future, but for now I need to find a way to take some extra B12 without going crazy. Are the B12 shots better? Or they also will trigger the anxiety?

 

I am a couple of months off Paxil, I am ok for now, but I don't want to spoil the good progress I am making.

 

Maybe I should cut the B12 pill in small pieces, I have a lot of exercise in cutting pills.

You may have better response to B12 as methylcobalamin (see link in Colleen's message). If you have any glitches in your methylation system, your body might not be able to convert B12 to its active form of methylcobalamin.

 

Just a thought!

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B12 shots can also make you anxious.

 

You may wish to try a fraction of a tablet of the B12 you've got, or get methylcobalamin liquid and titrate it.

 

The methylcobalamin form is the most absorbable form you can get in tablet or liquid.

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I need some advice.

I was recently to the doctor and after a blood test she said that I am low in iron and B12. She suggested me to take both supplements. I don't mind taking iron, but the 250mcg of B12 made me extremely anxious. I took only 2 pills and then I had to stop. I will go again to the doctor in a couple of weeks. What should I tell her? How can I take it, because I apparently need it, but without the anxiety, that is unbearable? 

I know, my question is not really related to withdrawal, but maybe somebody else had such an experience.

I had relatives with pernicious anemia, so this may happen to me too in the future, but for now I need to find a way to take some extra B12 without going crazy. Are the B12 shots better? Or they also will trigger the anxiety?

I am a couple of months off Paxil, I am ok for now, but I don't want to spoil the good progress I am making.

Maybe I should cut the B12 pill in small pieces, I have a lot of exercise in cutting pills.

You could try liver :).

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Or red meat. Grass-fed is best, the fat contains omega-3 fatty acids.

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I did try liver :). And I bought another package to prepare soon. I eat read meat at least once a week, but it is not enough for B12 intake.

 

Anyway, I tried a quarter of the B12 250mcg, so 62.5 mcg yesterday ( plus the liver). It was not very bad. I just had an increase of anxiety/trembling/ cortisol surge when waking up this morning. But I slept well, and this is going away after a few minutes. So it is acceptable.

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Good to hear, arwen. Maybe your body needs this important B vitamin.

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A short update about my B12 experience: After a few weeks taking small amounts of B12 (a quarter of 250mcg pill or less per day, liver, red meat), my blood test  for B12 was still pretty low. I realized I have to do something about it. 

 

I made an effort to take more B12. I bought methylcobalamin sublingual ( instead of the old cyanocobalamin pills I tried initially), and started taking 1000mcg per day. I was surprised to notice that it was not worse than before, not more activating (still some increased anxiety, but nothing comparing to the horror of withdrawal, not even a year ago), it even feels I am tolerating it better now. I hope next time I go for the blood test it will be much better.

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B12 is critical and if you are NOT a vegan and do eat alot of meat and you are deficient you have a problem with the absorbtion, probably a lack of intrinsic factor. Oral supplementation with B12 is poor...what makes you think that if you didnt absorbed it from food you will absorb it from pills? Deficiency needs IM injections. And dont get retested for b12 after you took b12...for like a month. It could show up falsely elevated. Also make a cbc to see the status of your cells. Severe deficiency causes macrocytosis (enlarged cells).

serum B12, methylmalonic acid(mma) and homocysteine...you need them all together. Why ? Because its hard to diffrrentiate between b12 and folate deficiency...folate can mask b12's hematological changes.

So, if your MMA is high that means only one thing...LOW b12, whatever your serum B12 is.

High homocysteine means low b12 or low folate(possibly both).

Aim for a B12 of 700 at least. Its crucial for DNA synthesis, myelin synthesis,production of neurotransmitters...etc. It has a huge role in the methylation cycle.

 

In a deficiency oral supplemention should be just along with IM injections...

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@arwen...1000mcg is acceptable. A quarter of 250mcg is nothing. I was taking 2000mcg along with IM injections.

 

You may feel worse at start...it takes a while...the liver stores b12 reserves for up to 5 years so if we find we are low in B12 it means we were low for at least 5 years.

 

But again this is just a small part of the puzzle. Folate has the same importance. There are people who got rid of longlasting agoraphobia with folate only to crash even worse after a few days of taking methylfolate. Its a complex thing..all is balance.

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We are at the beginning of an unusual experience at our house. My 13-year-old has not been feeling well. I thought she possibly had orthostatic hypotension and/or anemia as she eats little meat and loses a bit of blood all the time in her urine for a reason the doctors haven't been able to find. In the lab work up, they did a Vit B12 level, and it was the only abnormal finding (and she does have orthostatic hypotension)...it's ELEVATED. Looking on the web, there is just no "healthy" reason for it to be elevated. It is caused by a blood, liver, or kidney problem.

 

Well, I have been on a milligram of vitamin B12 since August, built up to it gradually over five weeks. In September a new PCP ran a bunch of tests that included it and mine was higher than the machine could measure, it just came out "greater than 1500." I thought that was normal for supplementing, but apparently it is not. In my case, for several reasons, I think my liver and kidneys have just been so overwhelmed with the poly pharmacy. I have an email in to my doctor as to what I should do now. With my daughter...good practice in trying to train your thoughts not to rush ahead of where real life is. But I just wanted to throw out the possibility of too much vitamin B12 into the discussion.

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Because B-12 allegedly helped with sleep wake disorder which I seemed to have somewhat similar symptoms to, I decided to try some B-12 since it was cheap and I was desperate to stay awake.  After taking it put me to sleep during the day, I quickly ditched that experiment.   Shouldn't have done it but desperation unfortunately ruled.

 

Wow, that is interesting your 13 year old has an elevated B-12 level even though she eats little meat.   In your cause, unfortunately, it isn't surprising.

 

I guess I should be grateful I don't have much luck with supplements as I wonder if I did, if I would suffer adverse affects.   Hard to say.

 

Best of luck with everything and sorting things out.

 

CS

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Metafolin, Deplin, or Metagenics FolaPro (l-5-methyl tetrahydrofolate or MTHF) are folate alternatives for people to take who cannot metabolize the usual form of folic acid in supplements. There is no reason to take a folate alternative if you don't have the MTHF mutation.

 

These folate alternatives are quite expensive, while ordinary B12 and folate supplements are very inexpensive.

This is where I am so confused, Alto. I've been taking Deplin 15mg for about 6 years (it was added by my pdoc to my SSRI) and was only recently tested for the MTHF mutations by an integrative doctor who said I shouldn't need it if I didn't have the mutation. Well, it turns out I *don't* have the mutation, but sure enough, any time I've tried to go off the Deplin (always CT, I've tried 3 or 4 times over the years b/c, as you mention, the cost is very high), within a week, I've been crying over everything, my mood depressed, I'm more anxious. Recently, when I added the Deplin back in, I felt better within hours. So doesn't it seem that this type of folate *must* be doing something for me? 

 

I asked about it over at Ben Lynch's site and his reply was basically that there's a lot involved in mythelation; it's more than just the mutation, and if its working, stick with it....Not the most thorough or helpful response--completely vague. 

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Hi guys - I am sorry if this is a duplicate post.  I read something somewhere about B12, but can't find it, despite my most fervent searches.

 

I have been on B12 injections for a year for fatigue, low energy, brain fog, etc.  Since then, I began tapering at 10% every 4 weeks.  The B12 helped the energy, but I had a lot of edginess, morning dread, anger, hyperness.  I quit the injections a week or two ago, but I am back where I was before the injections with extreme fatigue.  In fact, all I can do is sleep.  Feel groggy, can't think, can't focus my eyes.  I took some sublingual B12, but it hasn't really helped.

 

I am thinking of taking my B12 shot again because I can't be sleeping all the time!  I thought, looking back, that the Paxil caused the low energy as it is sedating and now that I am on a lower dose, I have more energy.  I do normally have super high energy with the B12.  I am afraid this is my future without B12 - sleeping, listlessness, low libido, sluglike.

 

Does anyone have any experience with this?  I think I read Alto had an article about B12 deficiency causing something - maybe depression.  Maybe that's what I am feeling?  Any help is appreciated.  Can't keep up with my kids or my life at this rate.

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a-mom, here is the topic you were looking for.

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Yay!  Thank you!  I ended up taking my B12 injection after reading about it's helpfulness with depression and positive affect on nerves and nerve cells.  I can't believe I felt so bad when I was NOT taking it.  Does this mean that it was in fact helping with my depression/mood problem?  Although I have been on Paxil 16 years, the way I felt was reminiscent of the way I felt BEFORE Paxil - slept a lot, sluggish, depressed...  I didn't notice an effect on anxiety.  I don't have anemia or any diagnosed medical condition.  A naturopath is treating me for fatigue and hormonal deficiencies.

 

In my web-stalking about this topic, I found an interesting article on a woman who was on all sorts of psychotropic medications and electric shock therapy for severe depression, auditory hallucinations, etc., and nothing helped her at all.  She was diagnosed with B12 deficiency, had an injection (or series of them), and was completely "better" in a short period of time.

 

I am sorry if this is in the wrong place BTW...

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I haven't read this thread yet - I'm looking for something else and stumbled onto this - but I wanted to comment that I had a crash this week.

 

And I wondered - since I've been taking sublingual B12 (I am NOT in SSRI withdrawal), I have to keep it separately from my other tablets, the ones in my tray, because it melts and makes a gooey mess.  So I keep the bottle NEXT to the tablets.

 

On the day in question, I forgot to take my B12.  For whatever reason.  

 

And I wonder about the contribution to my crash.

 

I'll read more here soon.

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