dreamingneonblack

Great experience withdrawing through meditation class

6 posts in this topic

Okay so no withdrawal experience can ever be great, but I say it relatively speaking.

 

I'm having withdrawals from a bout-of-panic taper (see my introduction about health insurance no longer covering my meds) I did last week. Two nights ago, I decided to go to my meditation class anyway. After meditation (we alternate between sitting and walking meditation where we try to focus on the present moment only, particularly the breath) we do contemplation. During this point we go around and introduce ourselves and if we choose we can add what we think. I had crazy anxiety at the thought of the attention turning to me and I'd stutter or try to explain my ideas but fail because of the brain fog and forgetfulness. I decided to continue my meditation by focusing on that present moment and experiencing my physical symptoms. I started to enjoy my anxiety because I realized how alert I felt. Not only that but I was wide awake and I'm usually so tired. My thoughts stopped racing because I was no longer focused on the future of all the ways I could fail and/or embarrass myself. I figured I might mess up and I think I could have explained myself better, but I did it and had a few people come up and chat with me after about what I said. Even before the positive reinforcement I realized it was the first time I could reflect back on an anxiety attack and think positively about it when I'm used to feeling so much shame.

 

Later, somebody told me that they try to meditate in everything that they do all day everyday. I decided to try this at work the following day as I was a bit panicky about my first withdrawals fresh out of college and into my career. I thought it was going to be worse because I would be more focused on the feelings of withdrawal but I think I was able to recover some of my work efficiency through the brain fog and even remember details a bit better than usual (imagine when I won't be withdrawing!).

 

I guess it makes sense that it would block my anxiety since anxiety is completely future-centric.

 

Fingers crossed I can keep at least half of this mental strength during the harsher moments of my withdrawals. I hope some of you may consider attempting this and get some relief from it as I did.

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Doing Meditation atleast for an hour helps in coming of withdrawal. Certain Neuro-Chemicals they tend to move across required Brain regions during meditation.

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Meditation is definitely supportive in the withdrawal process. It won’t magically remove all fears and worries, but it is a way to become aware of your resistence to them when they arise. After all it’s your resistence that keeps them alive and even adds wheight to them. So eventually through meditation you are the one dealing with whatever hurts you by growing as a person.

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On 06/05/2017 at 3:08 PM, excuse said:

Doing Meditation atleast for an hour helps in coming of withdrawal. Certain Neuro-Chemicals they tend to move across required Brain regions during meditation.

 

Is there any information you know of which supports this idea?

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7 hours ago, Hantise said:

 

Is there any information you know of which supports this idea?

Here is the complete article.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3190564/

 

Small snippet " Serotonin increase can interact with dopamine and this link may enhance the feelings of euphoria seen during meditation. ... There is an increase in the levels of the amino acid neurotransmitters, namely glutamate and GABA, during meditation "

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I imagine it is very helpful in managing the withdrawal, even though not offering permanent relief.

 

Btw, I've read about GABA somewhere else...what is it about GABA I wonder that helps the brain? I'm not an expert so can't say for sure, but it's a neurotransmitter which helps to inhibit excitability of the central nervous system, or something. The thing I read mentioned that aged whisky does something a bit strange..it increases the intensity of GABA receptor response, or something...but don't know if this is helpful for us here or not. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12926865

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