JamesMoore

Let's Talk Withdrawal, a new weekly podcast on antidepressants

93 posts in this topic

I can't get any of the episodes to play. It says there temporarily unavailable?

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James, I have loved all of your interviews. You've done a spectacular job lining up the members of the small group of courageous experts who are willing to speak out against the party line and expose what these drugs are really about and the harms they are causing so many people. But it is great that you are also including ordinary folks who share their personal struggles and the horror show they've gone through,  and the damage, albeit temporary, that has been done to them simply because they want to get OFF of the merry go round of drugging.  I especially enjoyed Megan's recent interview, and I look forward every Tuesday to the next one.   It is, to me, so good to hear people stating out loud "the unspeakable" truth--that our entire mental health/psychiatry system is built upon the shifting sands of lies and greed and iatrogenic harms. Thank you for doing this.

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Hi all

 

Thanks so much for your feedback.

 

@ChessieCat - That's a great suggestion thank you so much, I will follow up and keep my fingers crossed, Irving Kirsch would be a great interview to do.

 

@Jennifer78 - I am sorry to hear that, are you listening via iTunes or via my website? As an alternative, all the episodes can be accessed from this page: http://www.jfmoore.co.uk/podcast.htmlthere's a list of episodes at the bottom of the page. I hope that helps but please let me know if you still can't access them. They are also now all available on YouTube too here with captions too now for those hard of hearing: 

 

@DrugFreeProf - Thank you so very much for your feedback, I am really grateful to everyone that takes the time to listen in. The response has been amazing and I am so pleased to be able to capture these experiences and share them too. I have to say that everyone I have spoken with so far, including the interviews yet to be broadcast, have been so generous and gracious with me. What psychiatry has done to such generous, giving and caring people is dreadful and I really want to do my bit to raise awareness that the narrative of improvement in mental health treatment that we have all been sold is not backed up by the evidence or by patients experiences. I have now started to get more experts approach me to talk, which is incredible. I am putting some time and thought into how best to get this message out wider than this wonderful community and so we can reach the ears of those yet to come into contact with psychiatric services. The podcast too is also part of my own hearing journey and I take great comfort from stories like Megan's and the others too, realising that you are not alone in these struggles is a huge part of what leads to success when taking back control of your life. Many thanks to you for your lovely feedback and I'd love it if you kept listening in as there are more interviews in the pipeline.

 

Thanks so much to you all, being a part of this community is an amazing experience and one that the medical world could learn many many lessons from, particularly around inclusion and a non judgemental approach to support rather than a narrow diagnosis and 'compliance' which does not leave room for our differences.

 

Thank you all.

 

James

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Another one:  Gwen Olsen, author of Confessions of an Rx Drug Pusher.  She already has a couple of interviews but she was also on psychiatric drug/s herself and her niece committed suicide when on them.

 

Ex-Big Pharma Rep:  We’re Trained To Misinform -The Drugs ARE Dangerous (6 minute video)

 

Confessions of an Rx Drug Pusher (51 minutes Gwen Olsen - ex pharmaceutical representative)

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James, I have loved all of your interviews. You've done a spectacular job lining up the members of the small group of courageous experts who are willing to speak out against the party line and expose what these drugs are really about and the harms they are causing so many people. But it is great that you are also including ordinary folks who share their personal struggles and the horror show they've gone through,  and the damage, albeit temporary, that has been done to them simply because they want to get OFF of the merry go round of drugging.  I especially enjoyed Megan's recent interview, and I look forward every Tuesday to the next one.   It is, to me, so good to hear people stating out loud "the unspeakable" truth--that our entire mental health/psychiatry system is built upon the shifting sands of lies and greed and iatrogenic harms. Thank you for doing this.

Well said DFP.

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I have now started to get more experts approach me to talk, which is incredible.

 

Wow that is just tremendous.

I am just so blown away and so grateful for what you are doing.

The traction you are getting is phenomenal. I see T30 is posting your audios.

 

I like cc's recommendation to get G Olsen.

 

I was just thinking we all know doctors are clueless but surprisingly imo many pharmacists are aware of the harm being caused yet are not able to say anything. As one quietly leaned forward once and whispered to me  in acute wdl as i was seeking answers 'its not you its the drug but im not allowed to tell you that. ' At that moment for me the lightbulb went on and i went home and then found online support.

 

I believe mental health workers are also gagged as i spoke to one regarding the reason for a persons suicide attempt as being due to the ssri they were trying to get off and they also said to me 'yes we know that but we aren't allowed to say anything' .

 

Talking to a prominent pharmacist and health care worker may also be interview options.

 

This is what D Taylor said in 1999, clearly a man ahead of his time.  I wonder what this man might have to say today 18 yrs on. I guess he would be horrified at the iatrogenic epidemic nightmare that is occurring in society today.

I'd love to hear from Taylor again.

 

The real truth is that for many people antidepressants withdrawal  syndrome is neither mild nor short. Its not quite like standard texts say.  David Taylor chief pharmacist at the Maudsley Hospital London. Taylor D : Truth withdrawal, Open mind (National Association for Mental Health, London E14), September/October 1999, 16.

 

Anyway James thanks again for all you are doing. You single handedly are blowing a very strong breeze at this house of cards.

Wishing you even more success to unbelievable levels.

I hope your audios reach the millions who need to hear them.

 

nz11

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James, I just listened to your podcast interview with Dr. Joanna Moncrieff and it was an impressive interview. 

 

I hadn't heard about the RADAR study and as a long-term antipsychotic survivor myself, I'm very happy to hear that antipsychotic withdrawal is being researched. 

 

I think this kind of research holds great benefits not only for folks on antipsychotics, but also for antidepressant and benzo survivors for the simple reason that if antipsychotics aren't needed for the most serious of mental distress, are drugs really needed for other forms of mental distress? 

 

Also, since antipsychotics are often used as adjunct depression treatment for what is now labeled "treatment-resistant depression" and "bipolar depression," this research will hopefully open the doors for research into the antidepressants. It wouldn't surprise me to find out that many of the people on antipsychotics in this study were first on an antidepressant that sparked a psychotic or manic episode. 

 

Since the RADAR study is being funded by the UK government's NIHR, it's clear that more and more researchers and doctors are becoming aware that something has gone terribly wrong with these drugs. 

 

To add a follow-up to NZ11's comment, I also have gotten more information about these drugs from pharmacists than doctors. My last pharmacist had a very emotional reaction when I told her I was off all of my drugs and she told me about her own experience with Xanax, which she was prescribed for several months after having surgery. She said way too many people are on these drugs and the withdrawal can be nothing short of horrific. 

 

I wonder if you could interview a knowledgeable pharmacist? I wonder if there are any whistler-blower type pharmacists out there that would be willing to speak out about this? 

 

Thank you for another great interview. 

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Hi all, thank you so much for your feedback, I'm so grateful to you for taking the time to write.

 

@ChessieCat - thanks for this, I have been in touch with Gwen and I'm hopeful that she would be interested in an interview, you're right that an ex Pharma view of these drugs and the activities of these manufacturers would be really good context.

 

@nz11 - Thanks so much, like you I have found that Pharmacists are more open to discussing the limitations and problems with these drugs. Really interesting quote you gave from David Taylor. There is clearly a cover up and no one wants to admit the damage and harm, it's almost too big a problem to expose now but I want to keep trying. I couldn't do it without the support of yourself and many other on this site too, thank you.

 

@Shep - Thank you so much, Joanna was really interesting to talk with and it is good to know that work is being done to understand and document the experiences that people have taking these drugs. Like you say, the evidence shows that antidepressants are almost a gateway to an antipsychotic, I have certainly had to refuse Quetiapine on a number of occasions, even though I was persuaded very strongly that it would "boost the action of the antidepressant" which is, of course, nonsense. Thank you so much for taking the time to listen. I'd like to use some of your feedback in the podcast, I hope that's ok.

 

@DrugFreeProf - Likewise, I would like to use some of your very kind feedback in the podcast, I hope that's ok with you.

 

Thanks to everyone, I am still working hard on more episodes so please keep listening in.

 

Best wishes

 

James

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James, you certainly may use my feedback for any purpose you choose.

I am most gratified by what you are doing.

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Thank you so much, feedback really helps me to gain more awareness, I'm very grateful to you.

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@Shep - Thank you so much, Joanna was really interesting to talk with and it is good to know that work is being done to understand and document the experiences that people have taking these drugs. Like you say, the evidence shows that antidepressants are almost a gateway to an antipsychotic, I have certainly had to refuse Quetiapine on a number of occasions, even though I was persuaded very strongly that it would "boost the action of the antidepressant" which is, of course, nonsense. Thank you so much for taking the time to listen. I'd like to use some of your feedback in the podcast, I hope that's ok.

 

 

 

 

Hi, James.

 

Please do use any of my feedback here. I'm glad you find it helpful. And I'm glad you refused the Quetiapine. That is a very dangerous drug, and the last one I let go from my own cocktail. 

 

Thanks again for your podcasts. 

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Hi James,

 

You'll have to excuse how far behind I've gotten with the podcasts. I just listened to the interview with Christopher Jump. What an amazing program he's developed. I'm sure I echo others when I say how great it would be to have something like that available in my area.

 

I'm curious about something, though. Christopher, like many others, suggests that antidepressants are OK for short term use under certain circumstances. Whenever I hear this I can't help but wonder what they mean by "short-term" or "the right circumstances". When I first started taking the drug I experienced some pretty bizarre side effects for the first 6 months before everything evened out, and by the time those six months were over my brain had really adapted to the drug. So much so that I imagine even if I had come off then, I would have struggled with some very difficult withdrawal.

 

So when I hear someone suggest that using these drugs short term is OK I seriously wonder why they think that and I often find myself wishing they would expand on that thought.

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So when I hear someone suggest that using these drugs short term is OK I seriously wonder why they think that and I often find myself wishing they would expand on that thought.

 

I think that is a great point, Patricia.  My guess is that people have taken that position for several reasons, none of which are particularly compelling to me.  First, it sounds very radical to say "no antidepressants...ever" and people don't want to lose credibility when they speak.  Second, people are paying some sort of homage to those that say, "if it were not for ________, I would not be here in front of you right now."  It's almost as if it would be demeaning to their experience to eschew the value of antidepressants.  

 

My understanding of the way SSRIs work is that you are supposed to need 4-6 weeks for them to begin "working".  If that is the case it further confounds the notion of "short term" because I would generally view that to be 1-3 months or so and it takes that long to find out if they provide any benefit.  Add to that the statistics of SSRIs v. "active" placebo, i.e. controlling for drug side effects (see Irving Kirsch's work) and the fact that no significant difference exists and you come to the conclusion that the only benefit of the drugs is anecdotal in nature and people are simply afraid to appear heretical when they speak.

 

When you look at someone like Kelly Brogan who has decided to "throw away the prescription pad" altogether and does not write any scripts for SSRIs other than for weaning purposes, you begin to realize that nobody would be disadvantaged if they were outlawed (other than the need to get them to allow us to taper off!).

 

The one caveat to all of this is that human biological response varies dramatically.  That is why much of the buzzword in alternative, complementary and functional medicine these days revolves around the N of 1, i.e. individualized medicine.  It may well be that for the right person in the right situation an SSRI is the optimal thing to help them recover from a severe depression.  However, until we can test to determine who falls into that category and who does not, it is equally plausible that more people are being harmed than helped by a very long shot.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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Looking forward to diving into the podcast. Thank you!!!

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13 hours ago, PatriciaVP said:

 

I'm curious about something, though. Christopher, like many others, suggests that antidepressants are OK for short term use under certain circumstances. Whenever I hear this I can't help but wonder what they mean by "short-term" or "the right circumstances". When I first started taking the drug I experienced some pretty bizarre side effects for the first 6 months before everything evened out, and by the time those six months were over my brain had really adapted to the drug. So much so that I imagine even if I had come off then, I would have struggled with some very difficult withdrawal.

 

So when I hear someone suggest that using these drugs short term is OK I seriously wonder why they think that and I often find myself wishing they would expand on that thought.

I also wonder this and find it quite concerning. Especially in the case of immediate adverse reactions to these drugs. I took 1 dose of Sertraline and was extremely ill for a very long time. It was also what almost lead to poly drugging and hospitalisation.  When people are started on antidepressants I'm pretty sure most aren't aware that this is a potential consequence. There's no way of knowing before you start taking the drugs whether of not this might happen to you. 

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Remember everybody write a review of the podcast if you can! 

Note to self: fix/reset iTunes password so I can do this myself. ^_^

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Thanks for your responses Andy and Lyssa.

 

I figured the statement was more of a "cover your butt", and that most people who say it don't necessarily believe it. I just think it would be interesting if people who said it in the off handed way that they do were further pressed to clarify. It might result in some very poignant conversations.

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http://drpeterbregginshow.podbean.com/

My guest is British Aristocracy. Luke Montagu is the heir to Mapperton, the finest manor house in England, and is slated to one day become the Earl of Sandwich. But it has not been a charmed or fairytale life and antidepressants almost destroyed him. Instead of retreating into dreams of becoming an Earl, Luke has become one of the most compassionate and caring people I have had the honor to interview on the Dr. Peter Breggin Hour. He puts efforts in supporting the spirituality of the Dali Lama and in developing and distributing programs to teach compassion and forgiveness in schools. Beyond that, he manages to devote himself to the seemingly diverse task of bringing scientific sanity to psychiatry and mental health. I enjoyed and benefitted from having an hour with Luke Montagu. You will, too.

 

hope its ok to put this up here, its well worth a listen.

PB

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Just now, powerback said:

http://drpeterbregginshow.podbean.com/

My guest is British Aristocracy. Luke Montagu is the heir to Mapperton, the finest manor house in England, and is slated to one day become the Earl of Sandwich. But it has not been a charmed or fairytale life and antidepressants almost destroyed him. Instead of retreating into dreams of becoming an Earl, Luke has become one of the most compassionate and caring people I have had the honor to interview on the Dr. Peter Breggin Hour. He puts efforts in supporting the spirituality of the Dali Lama and in developing and distributing programs to teach compassion and forgiveness in schools. Beyond that, he manages to devote himself to the seemingly diverse task of bringing scientific sanity to psychiatry and mental health. I enjoyed and benefitted from having an hour with Luke Montagu. You will, too.

 

hope its ok to put this up here, its well worth a listen.

PB

 

Good post, Powerback. I listened to that podcast last evening and thought Luke was fantastic.  His timeline and the way he lays things out was very good.  I am thinking about asking my family to make their Father's Day gift to me to listen to the first 20 minutes of the podcast.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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23 minutes ago, apace41 said:

 

Good post, Powerback. I listened to that podcast last evening and thought Luke was fantastic.  His timeline and the way he lays things out was very good.  I am thinking about asking my family to make their Father's Day gift to me to listen to the first 20 minutes of the podcast.

 

Best,

 

Andy

Hope they do for you Andy .he can really make a difference in time good on him ,like our own James more .making a difference with the podcast .

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