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Flockhart Cytochrome P450 Drug Interaction Table


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#1 Altostrata

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 02:25 PM

Psychiatric drugs are often metabolized by liver enzymes. Multiple drugs may utilize the same enzyme, causing drug interactions, or normal variability in these enzymes may affect ability to metabolize specific drugs.

This go-to reference indicates potential drug interactions resulting from competition for, or effects on the human cytochrome P450 system, a way to identify the liver enzymes.

Flockhart DA. Drug Interactions: Cytochrome P450 Drug Interaction Table. Indiana University School of Medicine (2007). http://medicine.iupu...dis/table.aspx. Accessed 17 Nov 2011.

Full text pdf available at http://medicine.iupu...clinpharm/ddis/

An online interactive table is here.
This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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#2 Altostrata

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 11:57 AM

Another good source of P450 cytochrome information for specific drugs is http://www.drugbank.ca/.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

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#3 westcoast

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 12:55 PM

What an amazing amount of data. Might explain a lot. Venlafaxine/Effexor interactions could fill a phone book. Seroquel/quetiapine too. Bupropion/Wellbutrin not so much. (Alto's second post, above.)

2009: Cancer hospital said I had adjustment disorder because I thought they were doing it wrong. Their headshrinker prescribed Effexor, and my life set on a new course. I didn't know what was ahead, like a passenger on Disneyland's Matterhorn, smiling and waving as it climbs...clink, clink, clink.

2010: Post surgical accidental Effexor discontinuation by nurses, masked by intravenous Dilaudid. (The car is balanced at the top of the track.) I get home, pop a Vicodin, and ...

Whooosh...down, down, down, down, down...goes the trajectory of my life, up goes my mood and tendency to think everything is a good idea.
2012: After the bipolar jig was up, now a walking bag of unrelated symptoms, I went crazy on Daytrana (the Ritalin skin patch by Noven), because ADHD was a perfect fit for a bag of unrelated symptoms. I was prescribed Effexor for the nervousness of it, and things got neurological. An EEG showed enough activity to warrant an epilepsy diagnosis rather than non-epileptic ("psychogenic") seizures.

:o 2013-2014: Quit everything and got worse. I probably went through DAWS: dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome. I drank to not feel, but I felt a lot: dread, fear, regret, grief: an utter sense of total loss of everything worth breathing about, for almost two years.

I was not suicidal but I wanted to be dead, at least dead to the experience of my own brain and body.

2015: I  began to recover after adding virgin coconut oil and organic grass-fed fed butter to a cup of instant coffee in the morning.

I did it hoping for mental acuity and better memory. After ten days of that, I was much better, mood-wise. Approximately neutral.

And, I experienced drowsiness. I could sleep. Not exactly happy, I did 30 days on Wellbutrin, because it had done me no harm in the past. 

I don't have the DAWS mood or state of mind. It never feel like doing anything if it means standing up.

In fact, I don't especially like moving. I'm a brain with a beanbag body.   :unsure:


#4 Lilu

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 07:36 AM

This explains, I think, why my dental injection for a routine filling lasted almost 6 hours instead of 2. Lexapro/escitalompram is an inhibitor and the anesthetic Lidocaine is a substrate. So Lexapro inhibits the metabolism of Lidocaine.

  •  
  • Substrates: drugs that are metabolized as substrates by the enzyme
  • Inhibitors: drugs that prevent the enzyme from metabolizing the substrates
  • Activators: drugs that increase the enzyme's ability to metabolize the substrates

2005-2008 Effexor xr; 1/2008 Tapered 3 months, then quit.
7/2008-2009 Reinstated Effexor xr due to crying spells.
2009-3/2013 Switched to Pristiq 50 mg then 100 mg
3/2013 Switched to Lexapro 10mg. Cut down to 5 mg. CT for 2 weeks then reinstated for 6 weeks
8/2013-8/2014 Tapering Lexapro
11/2014 -8/2015: Developed severe insomnia, resumed using Ambien & Klonopin
12/2014-6/2015 Tried Ativan, Lunesta, Sonata, Trazadone, Seroquel, Rameron, Klonopin, Gabapentin
7/2015-1/2016 Reinstated Lexapro 2 mg (mild improvement, but crying spells still present)

9/2015-5/2016 Baclofen 30 mg (muscle relaxant for myoclonus) 

1/2016-5/2017 Lexapro 5 mg (worked well for 1.5 yrs, then depression relapsed.)

5/20/2017 - Now: Lexapro 10 mg 

Intro page: http://survivinganti...rsened-by-meds/


#5 Lilu

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 10:49 AM

Here's the link for Enzyme mediated interactions for Escitalopram (Lexapro)

 

https://www.drugbank...ions#enzyme-tab

 

I also found this study which is relevant to anyone who routinely takes Antacid (PPI) medications such as Prilosec and Nexium. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4297217/

Conclusions:

The effect of comedication with PPIs on the serum concentration of SSRIs is more pronounced for omeprazole and esomeprazole than for lansoprazole and pantoprazole, and escitalopram is affected to a greater extent than are citalopram and sertraline. When omeprazole or esomeprazole are used in combination with escitalopram, a 50% dose reduction of the latter should be considered.

Key Words: citalopram, escitalopram, sertraline, proton pump inhibitor, drug interactions

2005-2008 Effexor xr; 1/2008 Tapered 3 months, then quit.
7/2008-2009 Reinstated Effexor xr due to crying spells.
2009-3/2013 Switched to Pristiq 50 mg then 100 mg
3/2013 Switched to Lexapro 10mg. Cut down to 5 mg. CT for 2 weeks then reinstated for 6 weeks
8/2013-8/2014 Tapering Lexapro
11/2014 -8/2015: Developed severe insomnia, resumed using Ambien & Klonopin
12/2014-6/2015 Tried Ativan, Lunesta, Sonata, Trazadone, Seroquel, Rameron, Klonopin, Gabapentin
7/2015-1/2016 Reinstated Lexapro 2 mg (mild improvement, but crying spells still present)

9/2015-5/2016 Baclofen 30 mg (muscle relaxant for myoclonus) 

1/2016-5/2017 Lexapro 5 mg (worked well for 1.5 yrs, then depression relapsed.)

5/20/2017 - Now: Lexapro 10 mg 

Intro page: http://survivinganti...rsened-by-meds/


#6 Altostrata

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 10:06 PM

Yes, it's important for us to be aware of these resources regarding drug-drug conflicts. Physicians and pharmacists are supposed to be alert to that type of risk, but in the US, they often skip that research.

 

The results from the Drug Interactions Checker are partially based on drug-drug interactions, but the report won't give you that level of detail.


This is not medical advice. Discuss any decisions about your medical care with a knowledgeable medical practitioner.

"It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has surpassed our humanity." -- Albert Einstein

All postings © copyrighted.