Altostrata

Primary sources for data, records, papers

10 posts in this topic

PubMed, a site sponsored by the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health (NIH), is a centralized collection of scientific papers published in recognized journals from all over the world.

 

The search tool is easy to use. For example, enter "venlafaxine withdrawal syndrome" and you will get more than 80 results:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=venlafaxine%20withdrawal%20syndrome

 

(Venlafaxine is the pharmacological name for Effexor; use the pharmacological terms rather than brand names for better results.)

 

The results are mostly abstracts or summaries of the journal articles. In some cases, free full text is attached, or you might find free full text on other sites by Googling. If you really want an article, you usually can buy it from the journal publisher for $15-$25.

 

The abstracts and articles are written in scientific language and may be difficult to interpret. Do not jump to conclusions upon reading an abstract -- often you need to read the entire article, with a medical journal handy, to understand what the authors are really saying.

 

Even then, many studies of psychiatric drugs are funded by pharmaceutical companies and may be more positive about drug effectiveness and adverse effects than warranted by the data or by related studies.

 

Usually, you have to read several related studies to get a more complete picture.

 

Despite the pro-drug propaganda that tends to be embedded in these studies, antidepressant adverse effects and withdrawal syndrome have been documented for 30 years.

 

If you find interesting studies in PubMed, please start a topic and post links at least to the abstracts in this forum.

Edited by Altostrata
fixed link

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Surviving-

 

That is a good resource. Thanks for sharing... I do worry about the influence of big pharma with those studies and the potential and often prevalent underlying pro-drug sentiment. There is ambiguity and such to be found in the literature which as you stated can sometimes be hard to interpret. Often times there are conflicting statements as well.

I will definitely use the site as a reference point... and try to read into what they are saying as best as I can...

My brain is still in a fuzzy, hard to concentrate/comprehend point at this time however.

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You don't have to be fair. Just use the studies that support your point -- that's what researchers do.

 

And don't forget product inserts with black-box warnings about prescribing for children. They are available from the pharma companies. For example, Effexor XR package insert labeling.pfizer.com/showlabeling.aspx?id=100

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US Food and Drug Administration

 

Information about the US Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS)

http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Surveillance/AdverseDrugEffects/default.htm .

 

AERS statistics available at

http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Surveillance/AdverseDrugEffects/ucm070093.htm

 

Index to Drug-Specific Information

http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/PostmarketDrugSafetyInformationforPatientsandProviders/ucm111085.htm#P

 

FDA adverse events database

 

The FDA collects adverse events reports, such as antidepressant withdrawal syndrome, but has no way to mine them. (I believe you can request a raw download, but you need to put the info in a very large database to derive reports from it. I don't know how to request the raw data.)

 

A private company has made some basic reports from the FDA database available for free:

 

AdverseEvents.com: Retrieve statistics about adverse events from psychiatric drugs

 

PubMed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/

 

US Clinical Trials registry

http://www.clinicaltrials.gov

 

Drugs@FDA

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/drugsatfda/

 

NIH RePORTER

http://projectreporter.nih.gov/reporter.cfm

 

Dollars for Docs on Propublica http://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/

Edited by Altostrata
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I can't sort out how to use it... can't find a thing but I am not the smartest person here and not in top form... have you been able to make any use of it?

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you have to put in the extant link, DOI, or other concrete reference to what you are trying to access.  sometimes it will only pull up the publicly shared abstract, like on pubmed articles with nothing further available, but sometimes you can access the full-page texts, pdfs, or other materials that normally throw up the "you must have a subscription!" dialogue.

 

i dont know what it does, or how widely applicable it is.  i would have to read more about it and experiment.  make sure you are allowing the scripts/cookies/whatnot that it requires to run (but dont trust those scripts/cookies/etc blindly!).

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thanks IU I don't know cookies.. I eat them... I don't know scripts that for a movie right?  See I have no business even using a computer as I have no clue how they work.... but thank you for your efforts I will leave it alone. 

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haha, just internet browser muckery.  if you need any studies mined, PM me links/DOIs and i can see what comes up.

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haha, just internet browser muckery.  if you need any studies mined, PM me links/DOIs and i can see what comes up.

oh my even thinker into the weeds....

 

Data mining is a process used by companies to turn raw data into useful information. By using software to look for patterns in large batches of data, businesses can learn more about their customers and develop more effective marketing strategies as well as increase sales and decrease costs.

 

I know pharma does it with doctors and us to sell us more drugs... 

 

how could we use this to our benefit... what the heck is a DIO ok stop being lazy

digital object identifier (DOI) is a unique alphanumeric string assigned by a registration agency (the International DOI Foundation) to identify content and provide a persistent link to its location on the Internet. The publisher assigns a DOI when your article is published and made available electronically.

 

A message given to a Web browser by a Web server. The browser stores the message in a text file. The message is then sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from the server. Also see session cookie and persistent cookie.....guess I am the browser right

 

script...

In computer programming, a script is a program or sequence of instructions that is interpreted or carried out by another program rather than by the computer 

 

You challenge me to learn but it is not getting in just standing at the door knocking and knocking... I don't know if it is drug damage or stupidity... 

Guess I am a bit closer to some form of understanding....

long ago when I thought I was going to heal fast I thought I would return to school and study computers and chemistry... 

 

Now I just want to get thru life without too much grief... funny what long term suffering can do to a persons plans. I truly make no plans as who knows how I will feel that day. 

Thanks for the help IU

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