Altostrata

Tips to help sleep -- so many of us have that awful withdrawal insomnia

493 posts in this topic

I'm a good example of WD insomnia improving and then disappearing completely, along with your correct assessment of why there are so few posts about improvement and recovery.

 

During my worst, acute period between 2012 -  2013 I was barely getting 1 - 2 hours of broken sleep a night. Some nights I would doze off for a few seconds and then be startled awake, only to have the cycle repeat over and over all night long.

 

My ability to sleep properly has recovered slowly in a windows and waves kind of pattern, with it being disrupted by a variety of changing symptoms through the process.

 

Today, I can say that its 99% back to normal. Sleep is wonderful and restorative again and I never need to take anything to induce its onset. I reserve that 1% for the rare waves that I'm still getting from time to time and because I'm still sensitive to stress and some substances and these will also temporarily effect my ability to get a good night sleep.

 

I'm also an example of your correct assessment that when people start to get better, they visit the site less and therefore, don't post their increasingly more positive experiences or continue to document their ongoing recovery process.

 

You may have already seen it, but here is the link to our sleep topic:  Tips to help sleep -- so many of us have that awful withdrawal insomnia

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My daughter, Lexi (Lex1992) had HORRIBLE insomnia early in withdrawal. In fact, it was one of her first symptoms, which was followed by a cascade of many other terrible symptoms, which at this point have abated to a large degree, except for some anxiety and cognitive symptoms. In other words, in many ways, she is much better, but she is still not back to normal functioning. In any event, her insomnia, which was absolutely total for at least a month if not much longer, has now pretty much gone away completely. She is sleeping entire nights, sometimes 10 - 12 or more hours, although from time to time that block of sleep moves from nighttime to daytime!  Right now, her sleep is sound and pretty normal!  So yes, there is hope for relief from withdrawal-related insomnia!

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I was the worst case in terms of sleep. I had long term WD insomnia for 2 years.  I had the odd doze on the lounge but it was brutal with no relief for a long time . I sometimes managed to get a couple of hours sleep during the day when the exhaustion would finally overtake me.

 

I'm now sleeping normally . My improvement was quite sudden really. There is really no other explanation for my insomnia except withdrawal. I'm 99% improved but still have the odd sleepless night every now and then.  Having said that , I feel I'm over it and I usually sleep  approximately 7- 8 hours nightly.

 

I feel I'm doing better than most who haven't even had W/D , and I don't use any sleep aids including natural supplements. I had some success with Melatonin for a period of time but I didn't want to become reliant on it so only took it sporadically. I do feel it helped me at the time.

 

I know I get real restorative non - drug sleep now but it's been a challenge getting there. I was determined to avoid drugs of any kind.

 

Have I healed ?  I believe that I have and everyone can. It mostly takes time and patience.

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Petunia, DrugfreeProf, and AliG, thank you so, so much for sharing your stories of recovery and hope on this thread. Those of us still suffering with this symptom so need to hear these!

 

Catnapt, I am so sorry you are going through this. I do hope that these stories will give you some hope and encouragement. My insomnia actually began when I started Prozac in May of 2016, and when it did not resolve, I quit taking it in July, thinking that would fix everything quickly. But, the insomnia has been ongoing since.

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Close too my heart this one. You can only really judge it on an individual basis and how uniquely screwed up your nervous system is. I'm sorry too have too say that, Probably not very comforting too hear eh? What I can give you is a cast iron guarantee that it will get better but it's going too take time and patience.

You must be kind and forgiving too yourself.

When this all began for me after putting my nervous system through the ringer beacause I thought I was indestructible doing very naugthy things too it my sleep was absolutely destroyed. My sleep had done a Dorothy and said goodbye too Kansas. I'd go two days without sleep regularly and even when I did I'd only get a few hours at a time.

I drank heavily every night for a month just too knock me out completely which just exacerbated symptoms making me worse off! I'd dread the entire day about bedtime knowing that I woud not be able too sleep and when attempting too sleep the horrid HORRID feelings of disassociation and terror you know I can't even give it the justice with words it was bad.

And now, besides a hiccup recently, 99% of the time I can fall asleep with ease. Best advice I can can give you you is you must be as relaxed. For me, I had too try too clear my mind completely. Feelings and even thoughts were stimulating! What worked for me well back then was melatonin and a hopps/valerian mix.

Rest as much as you can and stay strong.

What was especially problematic for me at bedtime was I had trouble entering R.E.M. I found myself constantly stuck in R.H.M which my doctor diagnosed as rapid hand movement syndrome and that it was a chronic condition. Gotta have a sense of humour through all of this. It's kept me going.

All the best

Cookson

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Thank god for you Cookson and your sense of humour! I laughed so hard reading your intro in another thread. Please keep posting and making us (me) laugh. I need it. This is such a crazy journey. I'm here for you too! Although, not quite as funny as you are...but I try ;)

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We have many people who recovered from withdrawal insomnia. I had it myself for quite a while.

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Cookson and Altostrata, thanks for the replies! Do you mind my asking how long each of you experienced the insomnia? Mine actually started while I took the medication, and only worsened when I went off. It's been almost a year of this. 

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I'm having sleep difficulties lately, I am all over the place, sometimes I can sleep long periods, other times I wake up midway through the night and can't get back to sleep.  I'm finding this hypnosis video to be helpful though when I recall to use it:

 

 

It's also great as an active "change the channel" program, I had a massive stressor lately and it's all I can do to think about anything other than what happened, when I put this on though I can stop focusing on it so much.  Oddly I don't even have to pay attention to what the speaker says to get benefits. 

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I'm a good example of WD insomnia improving and then disappearing completely, along with your correct assessment of why there are so few posts about improvement and recovery.

 

During my worst, acute period between 2012 -  2013 I was barely getting 1 - 2 hours of broken sleep a night. Some nights I would doze off for a few seconds and then be startled awake, only to have the cycle repeat over and over all night long.

 

My ability to sleep properly has recovered slowly in a windows and waves kind of pattern, with it being disrupted by a variety of changing symptoms through the process.

 

Today, I can say that its 99% back to normal. Sleep is wonderful and restorative again and I never need to take anything to induce its onset. I reserve that 1% for the rare waves that I'm still getting from time to time and because I'm still sensitive to stress and some substances and these will also temporarily effect my ability to get a good night sleep.

 

I'm also an example of your correct assessment that when people start to get better, they visit the site less and therefore, don't post their increasingly more positive experiences or continue to document their ongoing recovery process.

 

You may have already seen it, but here is the link to our sleep topic:  Tips to help sleep -- so many of us have that awful withdrawal insomnia

Your sleep then sounds just like mine is now . very aggravating. I'm hoping mine improves soon .  

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I am tapering off of Lexapro and have trouble finding more than three hours of sleep per night. This was the case before I started the drug also. I am dealing with a great deal of health related anxiety, financial anxiety and CPTSD. Getting help with all of the above but I feel that if I could get a good solid 4 for 5 hours of sleep that I could deal with life more successfully.

 

Recently I read that Benadryl has been found to contribute to dementia. It crosses the blood brain barrier. I used to take Benadryl 25mg for sleep no more than 3 times a week, about two weeks ago stopped after I discovered a link between the drug and back pain not to mention the dementia news. 

 

QUESTION: What can I take to help me relax and fall asleep? Any herbal teas? I have hot flashes several times in the early morning but I am used to them. I won't take hormones. Sleep is of utmost importance to me right now. Sleep is healing. 

 

I am starting a cardio routine 45 minutes a day now. I am practicing Mindfulness also each day. 

 

Your advice is greatly appreciated. 

 

Kestrel

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You could look into a small amount of melatonin which some people do find helpful.  Have you tried all the sleep hygiene ideas in this thread?  

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In withdrawal is it normal to feel constantly wired? It is like I don't get sensations of being tired and drifting to sleep. I am feeling really sick from the insomnia - headache, nausea, weakness and muscle pain.

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I read through this list. I don't know what would fit the description. It is like constant, unrelenting adrenaline pumping but I am exhausted and mental functioning is becoming really difficult.

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My blood pressure is pretty low-ish 110/70 and HR is 70bpm. Not sure about cortisol levels. Maybe I could do an AM/PM test.

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UC.

I read through this list. I don't know what would fit the description. It is like constant, unrelenting adrenaline pumping but I am exhausted and mental functioning is becoming really difficult.

 

That sounds really normal in withdrawal. In fact it's a perfect description. You could do a cortisol test if you felt so inclined. It may be on the high side which is really no revelation. It's to be expected at this point. Maybe it will be better next year. I just had a full blood panel done - my only visit to the doctor and my cortisol has started to come right down from just a year ago.There have been many other improvements as well since I quit the drugs.

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Thanks AliG,

I am really having a rough time. I am desperate for some kind of relief because I am losing it now. I can only imagine what you went through. Psyc gave me three options - clonidine, seroquel, or to tough it out. The remeron reinstatement has not helped at all. I settled on 3.75mg for the past week but it hasn't helped at all.

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I am having issues with waking up at 3am. I go back to sleep, but it takes a while and it's super annoying. I dealt with it right after my initial reaction to ssris, but it got better overtime. I've had a pretty long & hard wave recently and with that, came waking up in the middle of the night. Anyone have ideas on what I can do to help? It's more annoying than anything.

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Have you checked out the links posted in Post #1 in this topic?  Have you read through this topic?

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Hello all. I've been on Paxil for the last 11 years. I started at 20mgs, and then the last 6 years or so i go from 17mgs to about 15mgs. Recently i went down to 15mgs and got terrible insomnia and night twitching. Does this sound like a withdrawal effect or could this be my anxiety about reducing my dosage? Any thoughts? Thank you.

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Topics merged, from:  "Has anyone who suffered with severe insomnia for months from withdrawal, ever healed from it?" by Daisies24

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the videos by this woman have been helping me- well I mean the audio portion, I put them on  and lay down and just listen to her voice

 

she has some that are 2hrs long and one that is 3hrs long. this is great for those of us who have very long sleepless and possibly anxious periods thru out the night or early morning

 

I have been feeling more and more calm as I listen to these.

don't be put off by the "hypnosis" part of these relaxation videos- as she says, ALL hypnosis is self hypnosis.

No one can come along and put you in a trance and make you do/feel things you don't want to feel or do.

 

If I find any video/audio that has triggering words or suggestions, I shut them off immediately and look for one that aligns with what I am wanting to hear, words and ideas that help me relax and feel stronger.


this series of videos have had a lot of suggestions and images of empowerment, calming thoughts, ideas to improve self confidence, etc, that I really wanted and needed to hear, so they've been very useful to me

 

YMMV* of course, depending on where you are in recovery and what sorts of things are important to you

 

 

*your mileage may vary

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