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Altostrata

About matrix formulation of tablets

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Altostrata

Drugs are manufactured in different ways. Some tablets, such as buproprion immediate release, will be released quickly into the bloodstream from the digestive system.
 
Other tablets have protective coatings that will gradually dissolve (reservoir matrix or reservoir or osmotic pump matrix). If the coatings are broken, the entire contents of the drug will be immediately released. These tablets cannot be cut, split, or crushed without making the drug immediate-release.
 
Other tablets, such as Pristiq, are manufactured in a monolithic matrix formulation. Rather than a timed-release coating, the coating on the Pristiq tablet is only protective. The extended-release mechanism is part of the tablet matrix, or the glue that holds the tablet together.

 

I verified the above in a phone conversation with Pfizer medical information (1-800-438-1985).

 

(If the tablet is split, the matrix is damaged and may not reliably be extended-release, depending on the size of the fragments. Larger fragments are more likely to retain some extended-release capability. When the tablet is CRUSHED, the matrix is completely destroyed. The particles should be assumed to have NO extended-release capability.)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3648939/
The Role of Oral Controlled Release Matrix Tablets in Drug Delivery Systems

You might excrete the shell of the tablet, or fragments of it. The coating material is not easily digested. See
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4110830/
Curse of the ghost pills: the role of oral controlled-release formulations in the passage of empty intact shells in faeces. Two case reports and a literature review relevant to psychiatry

 
http://file.scirp.org/pdf/PP20120100009_94401954.pdf
 
Pharmacology & Pharmacy, 2012, 3, 15-19
Development and in Vitro-in Vivo Evaluation of Controlled Release Matrix Tablets of Desvenlafaxine
DOI: 10.4236/pp.2012.31003 
Author(s)  Shashidhar Reddy Dodda, Prakash Rao B

ABSTRACT
The objective of this investigation was to prepare extended release tablet containing matrix granules of Desvenlafaxine succinate monohydrate and to study its in vitro release and in vivo absorption. The design of dosage form was performed by choosing hydrophilic hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC K100M), sodium carboxyl methyl cellulose (Blanose), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and lactose monohydrate polymers as matrix builders and polyvinyl pyrolidine (Kollidon K30) as granulating polymers. Granules were prepared by composing drug with HPMC K100M, sodium CMC, MCC and lactose monohydrate by spray drying method. Optimized formulation of Desvenlafaxine succinate monohydrate was formed by using 20% HPMC K100M, 26.6% MCC, 6.6% of sodium CMC (Blanose), 13.3% of lactose monohydrate and 5% ratio of Kollidon K30 as binder. Tablets were compressed with free flowing optimized granules of uniform drug content. This extended the release period up to 24 h in vitro study. Similarity factor and mean dissolution time were also reported to compare various dissolution profiles. The network formed by HPMC, MCC and Blanose had been coupled satisfactorily with the controlled resistance. Biopharmaceutical study of this optimized dosage form in rabbit model showed 24 h prolonged drug release in vivo. A close correlation (R2 = 0.9833) was established between the in vitro release and the in vivo absorption of drug. The results suggested that wet granulation with spray dried technique, is a suitable method to formulate sustained release Desvenlafaxine succinate monohydrate and it can Perform therapeutically better than conventional immediate release dosage form.

 

If you have additional information about matrix formulations of specific psychiatric drugs, please post is here (with reference links to authoritative sources).

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