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newtonsmom2000

newtonsmom2000 I survived Effexor XR

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If you'd like a more detailed account of my journey, please see my intro page.

 

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/4743-newtonsmom2000-introducing-myself/

 

4 and 1/2 yrs. after I took my first reduced dose of Effexor XR, I am anti-depressant free.  It can be done.  If you've got raised eyebrows over the length of time it took, there's a good reason for it.  If I hadn't gotten in a hurry in the beginning, I'm certain it wouldn't have taken so long.  I had to get to know my body and there were a lot of glitches in the process.  When I finally gave into taking it easy, exercising patience, keeping my eyes on the end-game, cleaned up my diet, things went so much more smoothly.

 

I just realized that I have earned a degree in How To Get Off Effexor- I should print myself a diploma.  Yea!!! 

 

Between Scarlett O'Hara (Gone with The Wind- "For tomorrow is another day") and Donna Sommer (I will Survive), I made it.

 

Thanks to this forum, to Alto for starting it and for all those who pass through looking for hope.  It can be done.  Not a single one of my docs along the way had any faith I would succeed.  I asked my current doc if she remembered she told me she had no confidence I could do this.  That was 3 years ago when I was at 7.5 mgs.  Her response- she was sure I'd not make, it but she was wrong.  No big deal.  NO BIG DEAL???  

 

I still have a benzo to get out of my life.  I'm in the process of getting my body stable so that I won't be faced with adrenal setbacks like I had with Effexor.  It has been a weird lesson for me to come to terms with the understanding I had physical problems that docs threw drugs at and refused to find out why I was having them.  But, I know now and I am looking forward to a bright and happier future.  I will be so relieved to be off the benzo- but this experience taught me to be patient, listen to my body, take care of myself mentally and physically.

 

If I have any parting words, this would be them.  Even though most who know me think I am gregarious and social, underneath I am an introvert.  This is not a good way to live.  We need each other and isolation is a huge battle I struggle with, every day- because it's easier.  The only real joy in life comes from being part of other's lives, not to get my needs met, but to be of service to them.  Life is out there and I'm not going to find it staring at some screen.  

 

So on that note, I'm signing off and going out for some fun!!!

 

Newton's Mom ( I never explained who Newton was- he was a precious kitten, rescued by some school children that had a lot of problems, deformed eyes and several diseases that were debilitating.  He was chatty and friendly.  Every day when my husband would come home, he would meet him at the door, walk into the bedroom closet while my husband changed clothes and they would have this long conversation.  He was so dear.  He lived a pretty good life but died young, at about age 7.  I can still see him jumping for joy in the rain when he got out one day.  He's my vision of joy and hope.  Thanks Newty for your encouragement during a hard time in my life).

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Wow,mfabulous success story!

So happy for you and very impressed with your endurance, faith and patience!

 

Thanks so much for giving back hope to the rest of the community!

 

The summary in your last update to your main thread is excellent too. Great info and lessons learned for everyone.

 

Best wishes to a ssri free life and best luck to your taper of clonozapam.

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Thanks! When I began my journey, I needed assurance others had made it and were doing well. I hope that I can offer that same assurance to others. You've made a brave choice to get off these drugs. It is possible to survive antidepressants! Thanks for your kind words.

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Inspired to read your withdrawal schedule..slow and steady indeed. When I come to taper the sertraline this is the kind of plan I have in mind...perhaps even 5% cuts.

I am nearly 20 months benzo free from a rapid taper and other prescription drugs olanazapine, trazadone, quetiapine, pregabalin as required! so it's going to take time for my brain to adjust and stabilise.

Were you able to live some kind of life throughout your taper?

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Hi, Whitewash!

 

I updated the last few reductions I made.

 

You asked if I was able to have some kind of life throughout my taper- yes.  Did everything go smoothly all the time? NO!!!  Getting to know my body was hard; getting in touch with the things that produced anxiety in my life was a big challenge.  If you read my intro, you'll see I went through a whole lot of life altering changes in the middle of tapering off this drug.  On top of that, I found myself in a new community with no friends for the majority of the time because we had just moved and I suffered a pretty serious injury to my pelvis that took about 18 months to heal.  The one saving grace was we were now near our daughter and her children.  The second year, she needed me to care for them on a couple of the days she worked.  Kids are great for keeping you sane and your mind off yourself.

 

 

I am also a member of Benzo Buddies and I was over there trying to figure out how I was going to handle my benzo reduction when the time came.  I discovered the blog/intro story of this woman named Flip, I think.  She is a compelling writer and her story reached into the depths of my soul.  There were 5 pages of her entries as she got off her benzo.  It took several days for me to read how she began in the dumper and came out on the other side a totally different, thankful, confident lovely woman.  Her story moved me to tears.  

 

Here's what I discovered about Flip- she found that she was a happier human being when she was connected and giving of herself.  She understood her real self was way more attractive and compelling than being a fake.  She committed herself to a goal of finishing school and getting her degree and being of service to others.  She went from being a recluse, myopically focused on her problems, to a full and vibrant life of service. (I loved it, too, because she referred to her husband as Mr. Flip).  Wish I had the link for anyone who would like to read her story.

 

I don't recall that I mentioned in my history that I lived through withdrawal from Fentynal.  I had a pinched nerve (pelvis again) and hardly slept for over 6 weeks when I agreed to use the stuff.  It wasn't a good thing.  When it didn't seem to be working, the doc switched me to a new drug on a Thursday.  Never change a drug over the weekend!!!!  The new drug was so bad, I couldn't tolerate taking it and went into opioid withdrawal.  That was 3 months of a hell I never want to know again.  This happened about 6 years before I began my taper off Effexor.  My clinical nutritionist told me that it was just being understood that it could take up to 3 years for my brain to recover from that episode.

 

You've been through a whole lot and you have a lot of drugs that are impacting your body.  I learned somewhere along the way to take things as they come.  There is so little in this life over which I have control. :blink:  I do what I can and leave the rest up to God.  You will make it.  One thing that has really helped me is to look back and find out so much of what seemed so overwhelming and consuming at some points was insignificant later.  I discovered I've had a great life, even with all the problems.  I try to look for the unmentioned beauty, the things we take for granted, and point it out to others.  To me, that makes life fun.  Sometimes it will be wildflowers, other times, an act of kindness.

 

Have courage.  You are already brave and outstanding because you are here and have decided living a healthy life is important to you.  

 

Newtons Mom 

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Thank you for sharing your story! 

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Hi newtonsmom. Thanks for coming back and posting your success story. How great for you!

 

I like when you say "When I finally gave into taking it easy, exercising patience, keeping my eyes on the end-game, cleaned up my diet, things went so much more smoothly" I find this is key and what I've been doing lately. It seems to work for me too.

 

Marie

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Congratulations, newtonsmom!

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Congratulations Newtontons Mum!

Your story is very encouraging and inspiring.

It is really nice of you to come back and post an update.

Wishing you all the best, Hopefull. :)

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Congratulations on beating effexor NM. My doctors didn't think I could get off effecor either, they always look at me with a shocked expression!  :P

 

Newton sounds adorable and I am gkad you have those precious memories of him  :wub:

 

Keep us posted how the benzo taper goes, you will sail through it with your patience and ability to listen to your body. 

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congratulations Newton's mom, it was a long road but you made it with patience and endurance. I hope to be able to do the same getting off lexapro

 

I'm so touched by your story of Newton. I, too, had a very special cat, and in fact, referred to myself as Snoopy's mom for some time. Snoopy was supposed to be a foster cat, but when I saw the shape he was in, and realized the shelter had no money to treat him, I adopted him. He was almost blind, and almost deaf, had diabetes and kidney failure... but he lived every single day to the fullest and found joy in the simplest of things. We didn't have a lot of time together, but the time we did have was very precious.

 

Thank you so much for sharing your story and giving those of us on the "other side" some hope!!

 

wishing you only the best as you go forward

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I know it's corny but I wanted to share the little poem I wrote when for my cat Snoopy.

 

it's called "What I learned from an old shelter cat"

Keep your heart open

for when love comes you way.

Live in the moment.
Cherish every day.

 

Time moves only forward

and flies by so fast!

so don't carry the burdens

and wounds of the past.

 

Be bold and be brave

and you'll have no regrets.
But most of all,

take all the naps you can get.

 

 

(Snoopy always looked so comfortable when he was napping, he truly relished his naps. I used to look at him and think, now there's a cat who naps like he means it LOL)

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