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Oberndorfer 2000 Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on objective and subjective sleep quality.

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Altostrata

Antidepressants destroy sleep architecture.

 

Neuropsychobiology. 2000;42(2):69-81.

Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on objective and subjective sleep quality.

Oberndorfer S, Saletu-Zyhlarz G, Saletu B.

 

Source

 

Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Vienna, Austria.

 

Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10940762

 

The purpose of this paper is to review the effects of selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors on objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality measures. Polysomnography (PSG) demonstrated in both healthy volunteers and depressed patients a decrease in sleep efficiency and total sleep time, a lengthening of sleep latency and a deterioration in sleep continuity, including an increase in the number of awakenings and wake time during the total sleep period. Sleep architecture mostly showed an increase in S1 and S2 and a decrease in S3, S4 and REM sleep as well as a lengthening of REM latency. Objective awakening quality, if measured at all by psychometry, generally showed no decrements. Concerning subjective sleep and awakening quality, normals demonstrated either no changes or a tendency towards a deterioration, while in patients some improvement was observed. Reasons for this discrepancy will be discussed. Novel 5-HT reuptake inhibitors with additional modes of action such as 5-HT2 antagonism (e.g. trazodone, nefazodone) are more likely to improve objective and subjective sleep quality, although some shortcomings may be inherent in regard to comorbidity (e.g. sleep-related breathing disorders). Thus, PSG seems to be a necessity for diagnosis and treatment of complex sleep disorders.

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bruno2016

so this is saying that people on AD sleep less? Or that their sleep is not as good? I get confused by the medical jargon. All i know is that I was super super tired on AD and I would sleep 12 hour nights with a 2 hour nap. It was insane!

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Altostrata

Normal sleep follows a pattern called "sleep architecture."

 

SSRIs disrupt that architecture. Some people will sleep more and some will sleep less.

 

It seems for some people, when they go off the medication, their disrupted sleep architecture does not recover, or gets worse. That's withdrawal insomnia.

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alexjuice

I experienced extreme sleep dysfunction while on ADs and also in w/d.

 

During the time I was on, I had regular insomnia and massive trouble waking up in the am. This was traumazing. I had multiple alarm clocks in my bedroom but would sometimes wake up, sleep walk and unplug all the alrms, return to sleep. When I would wake, I could tell instantly by the nature of the sun's light through the window that I had overslept disastrously.

 

I missed several college exams in the morning, waking up usually around noon or later, I began to have my mother leave work, drive the 20 min to my apt and knock on the window to ensure waking before test times.

 

It's really upsetting to think back to those days.

 

Alex

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