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Denstar51

Dysautonomia (autonomic dysregulation)

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Denstar51

Can anyone give any info on dysautonomia?

 

Seems my symptoms are bad enough to warrant this, and I'm into 32 months now

 

Denstar51

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Neuroplastic

Hey, Denstar. I moved your topic to the Symptoms - this way you will get more traffic. :) I'm sure people will soon chime in with the info.

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squirrel

I wonder about this too as my symptoms fit

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stan

Posted Image

Normally there is a stabilite in these two systems example :

heartbeat not too accelerate and not too slow ; as antidepressants fire receptors of nerves, it is going too slow or too fast heartbeat

i have as all people dysautonomia : many systems, organs do not function correctly

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squirrel

And is it permanent? Can anything be done about it?

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Healing

Sur knows a ton about dysautonomia. She was the one who introduced the idea to me that this is probably part of what's going on in SSRI w/d.

 

Until she gets here, I'll just say dysautonomia, or dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system, can be caused by many things. And we are still in the early stages of understanding why it starts and why it stops. It seems like it can come to a stop at any time, and we can't really predict when that will happen.

 

However, it's likely that all the healthy lifestyle things and all the stress reduction things probably make it *more* likely that the nervous system will re-regulate itself. That's the usual suspects -- good nutrition, exercise (depending on where you are in recovery), relaxation practices, meditation, cutting down on stressful situations, etc.

 

 

Stan -- thank you so much for the helpful graphic!

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stan

And is it permanent? Can anything be done about it?

 

what i understand actually : the poison fires an amount of nerves receptors , so nerves bath constantly in serotonin while body make homeostasis (kind of balance, he tries to live with the poison)

when we stop the poison or are in tolerance, the body is overhelmed by the toxic effects, he can no more make homeostasis, it is chaos because of lack of receptors

dysautonomia and many other functions are messed (physical and psychological)

is this state permanent ?

no , because we see people are able to function again, but we also see it takes not months, but years

can it reverse totally ? i think there is no reverse, brain needs to create new receptors and this takes years

every day brain makes update to recover

 

i wait your answers to Healing's questions ,

what can be done about ? time, no stress, well eating, supplements,exercising... but the biggest is time

i have not much testimonies after 7 years off to make rules of recovering

a serious damage can improve 90 % with years and be liveable

my first goal is 80/90 %

 

have you checked thyroid ? what meds are you taking actually ? (betaserc...)have you all these symptoms constantly ?

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squirrel

hi Stan, last time my thyroid was checked it was ok. I am not on any medication. my symptoms can change by the hour.

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Altostrata

Selections from an article on about.com (emphasis mine). This doctor gives a good overview of symptoms but does not mention insomnia and hypersensitivity to sympathomimetic and parasympathomimetic drugs, which are also dysautonomic conditions:

 

http://heartdisease.about.com/cs/womensissues/a/dysautonomia.htm

 

Dysautonomia

From Richard N. Fogoros, M.D.,

A family of misunderstood disorders

In the 19th and early 20th centuries there used to be a condition called neurasthenia. People would find themselves suddenly unable to function, due to a host of inexplicable symptoms, often including fatigue, weakness, strange pains, dizziness and passing out. Doctors would not find anything to explain these symptoms, so they were attributed to a "weak nervous system," or neurasthenia. Women with neurasthenia (for men were not given this diagnosis, by and large) were often confined to their beds, where they would either recover or, eventually, die. And while nobody knew what caused this condition, everyone - doctors and laymen alike - took it seriously.

 

Most modern doctors hearing about this mysterious condition merely shake their heads in wonder. Few seem to consider the possibility that "neurasthenia" is still with us....

 

Yesterday's neurasthenia, today's dysautonomia

People who a century ago would have been called "neurasthenics" today are given a host of diagnoses. These include chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS,) vasovagal or neurocardiogenic syncope, panic attacks, anxiety, inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST,) irritable bowel syndrome (IBS,) postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS,) or fibromyalgia. Sufferers of all these conditions tend to experience an imbalance, and most often a peculiar volatility, in the autonomic nervous system - an imbalance that we now call dysautonomia.

 

The autonomic nervous system controls the “unconscious” bodily functions, such as heart rate, digestion, and breathing patterns. The autonomic nervous system consists of two parts: the sympathetic system and the parasympathetic system. The sympathetic system can best be thought of as controlling the “fight or flight” reactions of the body, producing the rapid heart rates, increased breathing, and increased blood flow to the muscles that are necessary when an individual is in danger or under stress. The parasympathetic system controls the “quiet” body functions, for instance, the digestive system. In short, the sympathetic system gets the body ready for action, while the parasympathetic system gets the body ready for rest. And in normal individuals, the parasympathetic and sympathetic components of the autonomic nervous systems are in perfect balance, from moment to moment, depending on the body’s instantaneous needs.

 

In people suffering from dysautonomia, the autonomic nervous system loses that balance, and at various times the parasympathetic or sympathetic systems inappropriately predominate. Symptoms can include frequent, vague but disturbing aches and pains, faintness (or even actual fainting spells), fatigue and inertia, severe anxiety attacks, tachycardia, hypotension, poor exercise tolerance, gastrointestinal symptoms such as irritable bowel syndrome, sweating, dizziness, blurred vision, numbness and tingling, anxiety and (quite understandably), depression.

 

Sufferers of dysautonomia can experience all these symptoms or just a few of them. They can experience one cluster of symptoms at one time, and another set of symptoms at other times. The symptoms are often fleeting and unpredictable, but on the other hand they can be triggered by specific situations or actions. (Some people have symptoms with exertion, for instance, or when standing up, or after ingesting certain foods.) And since people with dysautonomia are usually normal in every other way, when the doctor does a physical exam he or she often finds no abnormalities.

....

 

What becomes of people with dysautonomia?

Fortunately, the prognosis appears far better than it was in the days when the disorder was called neurasthenia. ...Most victims of dysautonomia eventually find that their symptoms either go away or abate to the point that they are able to lead nearly normal lives. Sometimes, in fact, the probability that things will ultimately improve on their own may be the only thing that keeps some of these individuals going.

 

But even though the symptoms eventually improve in most cases, many people with dysautonomia experience symptoms that completely disrupt their lives, and the search for competent medical assistance in rendering their symptoms tolerable is too often a difficult one.

 

The problem of evaluating dysautonomia

The severity of the symptoms in people with dysautonomia are typically far out of proportion to any objective physical or laboratory findings (especially when the doctors don't know which findings to look for.) This lack of objective findings makes life very difficult. In modern medical practice, grounded as it is in the gathering and interpretation of objective data, when patients have the audacity to complain of symptoms without providing the objective medical findings to back them up, they are often written off as being hysterical.

 

Patients lucky enough to be taken seriously by their family doctors are likely to be referred to a specialist. The type of specialist they are sent to usually depends on the predominant symptom they are experiencing, or on the symptom that most impresses the family doctor.

 

And the diagnosis they are ultimately given depends on their predominant symptoms and which specialist they end up seeing. Thus: Those whose main complaint is easy fatigability are likely to be diagnosed with CFS. Those who pass out are labelled as vasovagal or neurocardiogenic syncope. Those whose resting pulses are noticeably high are said to have IST. If dizziness on standing up is the chief problem, POTS is the diagnosis. Diarrhea or abdominal pain buys you irritable bowel syndrome. Pain elsewhere ends up being fibromyalgia. Whatever the diagnosis, however, a dysfunctional autonomic nervous system almost always plays a major part in causing the symptoms.

 

And whatever the symptoms and whatever the diagnosis, all these syndromes are real, honest-to-goodness physiologic (as opposed to psychologic) disorders – probably variants of the same general disorder of the autonomic nervous system – and while they can make anybody crazy, they are not caused by craziness.

 

What causes dysautonomia?

Dysautonomia (and all of the above syndromes) are caused by many different things, and do not have one, single, universal cause. It seems clear that some patients inherit the propensity to develop the dysautonomia syndromes, since variations of dysautonomia often run in families. Viral illnesses can trigger a dysautonomia syndrome. So can exposure to chemicals. (Gulf War Syndrome is, in effect, dysautonomia – low blood pressure, tachycardia, fatigue and other symptoms – that, government denials aside, appears to have been triggered by exposure to toxins.)

 

Dysautonomia can result after various types of trauma, especially trauma to the head and chest. (It has been reported to occur after breast implant surgery.) Dysautonomias caused by viral infections, toxic exposures, or trauma often have a rather sudden onset. Chronic fatigue syndrome, for instance, most classically begins following a typical viral-like illness (sore throat, fever, muscle aches, etc.,) but any of the dysautonomia syndromes can have a similar onset.

....

 

How is dysautonomia treated?

Unfortunately, just as there is no generally accepted nomenclature for the dysautonomia syndromes, just as there is no generally accepted set of criteria for diagnosing many forms of dysautonomia, just as there is no general agreement on their causes or on the precise mechanism that produces the autonomic imbalance, so there is no generally accepted approach to treatment. Possibly the most important step in treatment is to find a physician who understands the nature of the problem, is sympathetic toward it (i.e., does not consider you merely a crazy person,) and who is willing to take the prolonged trial-and-error approach that is often necessary in reducing symptoms to a tolerable level.

 

In any case, since the underlying cause of dysautonomia is not known, treatment is largely aimed at controlling symptoms, and not at "curing" the problem.

 

Non-drug therapies

Physical activity: While most doctors don't realize it, the experiment as to whether restricting physical activity helps dysautonomia was done 100 years ago.

 

The experiment failed. Big time. Thus: maintaining a daily level of physical activity is probably the most important thing people with dysautonomia can do. Some daily level of moderate activity helps to stabilize the autonomic nervous system, and in the long run makes "relapses" of symptoms more rare and of shorter duration. Physical activity may even hasten the day when symptoms go away on their own.

 

Physical therapy and similar "alternative" treatments such as yoga, tai-chi, massage therapy, and stretching therapy have been reported to help as well.

 

Dietary supplements: Any time a medical condition exists that doctors treat poorly, purveyors of dietary supplements have an open field for pushing their products. Not only do patients feel they may have no better alternative, but also the medical profession, embarrassed by its failure to treat effectively, has little grounds for complaint. Consequently, thousands of unsubstantiated claims have been made about the ability of various vitamins, coenzymes and herbal preparations (all the usual suspects - you know the ones) to relieve the symptoms of dysautonomia. As a member of the embarrassed medical establishment, DrRich can only say - it's your money; try not to spend it on anything that will hurt you.

 

Drug therapies

A host of pharmaceutical agents have been tried in patients with dysautonomia. Those most commonly felt to be useful include:

 

Tricyclic antidepressants - such as amitriptyline (Elavil,) desipramine (Norpramin,) and nortriptyline (Pamelor) - have been used, in low dosage, to treat several of the dysautonomia syndromes. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) - such as fluoxitine (Prozac) sertraline (Zoloft,) and paroxetine (Paxil) - have also been used to treat these syndromes. When effective, the tricyclics and the SSRIs appear to do more than merely control any depression that might accompany the dysautonomias. There is some evidence that they might help to "re-balance" the autonomic nervous systems in some patients.

 

Anti-anxiety drugs - such as alprazolam (Xanax) and lorazepam (Ativan) help to control symptoms of anxiety, especially in patients with panic disorder.

 

Anti-low blood pressure drugs - Fludrocortisone (Florinef) helps prevent the symptoms caused when the blood pressure drops when the patient is upright (a condition called orthostatic hypotension.) Orthostatic hypotension is prominent in vasovagal syncope and in POTS.

 

Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs - Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil,) and naproxen (Naprosen, Aleve) can help control the pains associated with the dysautonomias, especially fibromyalgia.

 

It is worth mentioning again that there is no tried and true treatment method that always works in treating patients with dysautonomia. A trial and error approach, requiring the patience of both doctor and patient, is almost always necessary. In the meantime, victims of dysautonomia can try to reassure themselves by remembering two facts. First, dysautonomia usually improves as time goes by. Second, the academic medical community (and the pharmaceutical companies ) have now accepted the dysautonomia syndromes as real, physiological medical conditions. Consequently, a tremendous amount of research is going on to define the precise causes and mechanisms of these conditions, and to devise treatments that are effective more often and to a greater extent than many of the treatments being used today.

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stan

good article

 

but today i think (hope i am right):

i see two kinds of dysautonomia: one which comes naturally (not from meds or someone who continue to take them) and with who it will be difficult to manage symptoms ; apparently cannot be cured

and another kind which results from nerves receptors fired (who can re-grow) , and this one can recover much , we call it withdrawal prolonged syndrome

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Altostrata

...

i see two kinds of dysautonomia: one which comes naturally (not from meds or someone who continue to take them) and with who it will be difficult to manage symptoms ; apparently cannot be cured

and another kind which results from nerves receptors fired (who can re-grow) , and this one can recover much , we call it withdrawal prolonged syndrome

 

As I understand it, there are three kinds:

 

- Familial or inherited dysautonomia: Genetic and the most severe; onset is early in life and continuous. In neurology journals, this is what is most often discussed as dysautonomia. The list of potential dysautonomia symptoms is derived from research on familial dysautonomia.

 

The poor outcomes from this condition do not apply to us. Don't read those articles if they scare you.

 

- Acquired dysautonomia: As the article describes, people may develop autonomic symptoms after infections or exposure to toxins, and these are diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, etc. Recovery is slow and can take years.

 

Some otherwise healthy people spontaneously develop autonomic symptoms from unknown causes, which also clear up spontaneously, although not necessarily quickly.

 

- Iatrogenic dysautonomia: This might fall into the "toxins" category, except that it is after exposure to medical treatment, such as psychiatric medications or sedatives. (Healing posted an article about this in Media http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/58-icu-sedation-can-cause-cognitive-impairment/)

 

This is our category: A previously stable nervous system is assaulted by a pharmaceutical. We know it is not progressive and corrects gradually. It is an advantage that we started with stable autonomic patterns to which our nervous systems can return -- the underlying pattern is still there, engrained in the neurons.

 

(I also believe that, rarely, the stress of withdrawal can touch off incipient autoimmune conditions or other true diseases, but that affects a minority of people suffering from withdrawal syndrome.)

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stan

- Acquired dysautonomia: As the article describes, people may develop autonomic symptoms after infections or exposure to toxins, and these are diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, etc. Recovery is slow and can take years.

 

Some otherwise healthy people spontaneously develop autonomic symptoms from unknown causes, which also clear up spontaneously, although not necessarily quickly.

 

these people have often "only" fibromyalgia or else, they can function 80 % ...

 

- Iatrogenic dysautonomia: This might fall into the "toxins" category, except that it is after exposure to medical treatment, such as psychiatric medications or sedatives. (Healing posted an article about this in Media http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/58-icu-sedation-can-cause-cognitive-impairment/)

 

This is our category: A previously stable nervous system is assaulted by a pharmaceutical. We know it is not progressive and corrects gradually. It is an advantage that we started with stable autonomic patterns to which our nervous systems can return -- the underlying pattern is still there, engrained in the neurons.

 

(I also believe that, rarely, the stress of withdrawal can touch off incipient autoimmune conditions or other true diseases, but that affects a minority of people suffering from withdrawal syndrome.)

 

these people have often all systems messed in the first months, they cannot function 80 %, but after a while they recover many functions

 

you have explained it better as i with my bad english, cognition and memory messed...

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Altostrata

You do okay, stan!

 

Some people with fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome are very sick, others cope with their symptoms and lead normal lives. Sleep disturbances are common in both conditions.

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stan

You do okay, stan!

 

Some people with fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome are very sick, others cope with their symptoms and lead normal lives. Sleep disturbances are common in both conditions.

 

you are right, i never had these illness, i experience only pseudo fibro and CFS, it is not the same;

Sleep disturbances, i know , with my nocturia, i ask myself how can i sleep !

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Altostrata

I definitely had pseudo-fibro for about a year and a half, tingling pain in my hands, wrists, arms, and right shoulder. Acupuncture eventually did the trick, just like that, it went away after a session.

 

I still have to be careful not to do too much mousing with that right arm.

 

Fatigue, also, but not chronic fatigue syndrome. Usually CFS sufferers also have a lot of illnesses, respiratory and otherwise, and my general health has been amazingly good throughout withdrawal syndrome, with maybe colds or flu only a few times in 6-plus years.

 

I read somewhere that increased cortisol mobilizes the immune system, maybe I can find that again.

 

Denstar, how are you doing?

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NoMeaning25

Anyone know if this will work? http://blog.synergyhealthconcepts.com/new-treatment-for-dysautonomia/

 

Alto, is this actually what we are dealing with?? 

 

http://www.dinet.org/index.php/information-resources/pots-place/pots-symptoms Is withdrawal just dysautonomia or is it a combination of things?

 

Im just trying to figure out whats wrong with me so that i can at least show my mom what im dealing with and find a doctor willing to work with me. 

 

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Wildflower0214

I was diagnosed with POTS when i was 16, which is a form if dysautonomia. I saw a dr about a year ago who told me that they thought I had severe adrenal fatigue instead. Who knows what the validity of that claim was.

 

Anyways, if I do indeed have POTS, that would mean that my nervous system was already screwed up, so this SSRI WD is not helping. I feel like my WD is pretty sh*ty compared with most. Wondering if this plays a role. Anyone else have any nervous system stuff or autoimmune disease?

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degen12

I have POTS that is linked to a rapid (6-week) benzo withdrawal. I was hospitalized for a week before benzodiazepines were reinstated. My symptoms rapidly improved and I could finally stand without pre-syncope and a HR of over 160. I never returned to my former baseline however, and a course of Florinef is probably in order for me.

 

It is possible that WD from SSRIs could worsen POTS, since SSRIs increase the standing vasoconstrictive reflex, but I am not a doctor nor an expert in dysautonomia.

 

I suggest you register at the Dinet forums, if you have not already. There are many knowledgeable people there and they can help you find an expert in your area. If you have dysautonomia, it needs treatment.

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Altostrata

It would be interesting to hear what a dysautonomia expert (usually, a neurologist) knows about iatrogenic dysautonomia.

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Wildflower0214

I have POTS that is linked to a rapid (6-week) benzo withdrawal. I was hospitalized for a week before benzodiazepines were reinstated. My symptoms rapidly improved and I could finally stand without pre-syncope and a HR of over 160. I never returned to my former baseline however, and a course of Florinef is probably in order for me.

 

It is possible that WD from SSRIs could worsen POTS, since SSRIs increase the standing vasoconstrictive reflex, but I am not a doctor nor an expert in dysautonomia.

 

I suggest you register at the Dinet forums, if you have not already. There are many knowledgeable people there and they can help you find an expert in your area. If you have dysautonomia, it needs treatment.

The problem is, because of this WD, I can't tokerate meds at all. So not much to treat. And for that matter, my POTS has not returned. I haven't had the rapid heart rate etc. I'm wondering if I ever had it at all.

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degen12

 

I have POTS that is linked to a rapid (6-week) benzo withdrawal. I was hospitalized for a week before benzodiazepines were reinstated. My symptoms rapidly improved and I could finally stand without pre-syncope and a HR of over 160. I never returned to my former baseline however, and a course of Florinef is probably in order for me.

 

It is possible that WD from SSRIs could worsen POTS, since SSRIs increase the standing vasoconstrictive reflex, but I am not a doctor nor an expert in dysautonomia.

 

I suggest you register at the Dinet forums, if you have not already. There are many knowledgeable people there and they can help you find an expert in your area. If you have dysautonomia, it needs treatment.

The problem is, because of this WD, I can't tokerate meds at all. So not much to treat. And for that matter, my POTS has not returned. I haven't had the rapid heart rate etc. I'm wondering if I ever had it at all.

 

 

What symptoms of dysautonomia are you experiencing? Do you have a blood pressure monitor. You can always go to a search engine and learn about the "poor man's tilt table test". Still I recommend you go to the website I suggested, which has a list of dysautonomia experts. Since you are in the US your search will be much easier.

 

 

@Altostrata: I'm not sure, but a resident at a local ER told me that benzodiazepine withdrawal can cause dysautonomia, without my prompting her. She just knew that I was a dysautonomniac and was on benzodiazepines.

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Wildflower0214

 

 

 

I have POTS that is linked to a rapid (6-week) benzo withdrawal. I was hospitalized for a week before benzodiazepines were reinstated. My symptoms rapidly improved and I could finally stand without pre-syncope and a HR of over 160. I never returned to my former baseline however, and a course of Florinef is probably in order for me.

 

It is possible that WD from SSRIs could worsen POTS, since SSRIs increase the standing vasoconstrictive reflex, but I am not a doctor nor an expert in dysautonomia.

 

I suggest you register at the Dinet forums, if you have not already. There are many knowledgeable people there and they can help you find an expert in your area. If you have dysautonomia, it needs treatment.

The problem is, because of this WD, I can't tokerate meds at all. So not much to treat. And for that matter, my POTS has not returned. I haven't had the rapid heart rate etc. I'm wondering if I ever had it at all.

What symptoms of dysautonomia are you experiencing? Do you have a blood pressure monitor. You can always go to a search engine and learn about the "poor man's tilt table test". Still I recommend you go to the website I suggested, which has a list of dysautonomia experts. Since you are in the US your search will be much easier.

 

 

@Altostrata: I'm not sure, but a resident at a local ER told me that benzodiazepine withdrawal can cause dysautonomia, without my prompting her. She just knew that I was a dysautonomniac and was on benzodiazepines.

Well, I have all kinds but that is because I am going through a crappy SSRI WD. So, I can't use that as an indicator of what I would be experiencing without this circumstance. I had it starting when I was 13 and until 16 it was a problem. They put me a beta blockers for a few years and I hated them. Went off. I worked a full time job for several years on no med at all and was ok with it, until my mom got cancer and I ended up on an SSRI. And now I'm here.

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Wildflower0214

They actually treat dysautonomia with SSRIs. Lol

They tried to put me on Paxil when I was diagnosed. I have another friend who has POTS and they practically shoved them down her throat.

It's pretty standard practice. Frightening. That's a large part of how I ended up on Lexepro. So, unless someone finds a neurologist who is different from the five I've seen or the half dozen my friend has seen who has this, they are gonna push beta blockers or AD. Take your pick. :( that at least has been my experience. And I've been dealing with dysautonomia and neurologists for about 16 years with this. They just keep repeating the same mantra.

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Altostrata

merged similar topics

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ikam

It makes me wonder how it is with people who were exposed to severe trauma in childhood. I know for sure that my autonomic nervous system was constantly in fight flight freeze response. So my system never had chance to develop more balanced response...

I have gone through many years of therapy, but my body still responds with alarm...then I need to get back to reality, check if my reaction is relevant to the trigger, etc. Something like with neuro-emotions, I need to check if I respond from here and now or from my past...

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pepper59

I have been told by my neurologist that I have gluten-sensitive small fiber neuropathy which started as pain and has progressed to dysautonomia. The pain from the neuropathy improved greatly with dietary changes, so it made no sense that the autonomic symptoms would have worsened. I think the dysautonomia is actually from trazodone, which I am trying to wean off of. 

 

I have a great, nutrition-oriented primary doctor. She recommended I eliminate every speck of gluten and stick to a strict, anti-inflammatory diet based on the principles in the book It Starts With Food. This is not an easy diet. I had to learn to cook and eat all over again. It took months. But I was very motivated because I was in such terrible pain. I still have occasional scary flares of pain (which hugely trigger my anxiety), but the pain is now mostly under control. I would never, no never go back to eating the way I used to. 

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ikam

I have been told by my neurologist that I have gluten-sensitive small fiber neuropathy which started as pain and has progressed to dysautonomia. The pain from the neuropathy improved greatly with dietary changes, so it made no sense that the autonomic symptoms would have worsened. I think the dysautonomia is actually from trazodone, which I am trying to wean off of. 

 

I have a great, nutrition-oriented primary doctor. She recommended I eliminate every speck of gluten and stick to a strict, anti-inflammatory diet based on the principles in the book It Starts With Food. This is not an easy diet. I had to learn to cook and eat all over again. It took months. But I was very motivated because I was in such terrible pain. I still have occasional scary flares of pain (which hugely trigger my anxiety), but the pain is now mostly under control. I would never, no never go back to eating the way I used to.

 

I am going to meet naturopath soon. I really need to get good consultation on food and supplements. She helped me in the past and she also works with people who have been put on various meds (not just antidepresants)...

 

For me disautonomia relates to my childhood trauma...so i think it is set for life, I have always responded to many stimuly in oversensitive manner...

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vonant

Hello. I want to inquire about dysautonomia. It is pretty well reported I think that most of us suffer from issues related to the autonomic nervous system. Here are the primary symptoms as listed on wikipedia. Lately I experience pretty much all of these. 

.

 

I want to enquire specifically about THIRST and DISTENTION OF THE ABDOMEN and EXCESSIVE SWEATING. These I have had pretty much since terminating Citalopram. Even towards the end of being on them. Wearing a black t-shirt leaves me with basketball sized sweat pockets under my arms. My belly changes in size and sometimes I looks like I'm pregnant (I'm a 26 yo male). And I drink loads and loads of water. Always thirsty. I want to know if other people experience this exactly because I havn't heard much reporting on these, and I fear I am developing auto immune disorder which shares these.

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Altostrata

Here's an interesting article about supplements for POTS and other autonomic problems  http://thelowhistaminechef.com/dr-diana-driscoll-interview-vagus-nerve-and-potsmast-cell-activation/

 

It's an interview with Dr. Diana Driscoll, an optometrist who suffers from POTS and other autonomic ailments. She traces this to vagus nerve dysfunction due to a lack of acetylcholine. (This is related to some kind of anti-cholinergic activity, drug-caused or otherwise.)

 

To treat this, Dr. Driscoll has developed a rather expensive supplement containing ingredients that may be stimulating:

  • Huperzine A
  • Alpha-GPC (Alpha GlyceroPhosphoCholine)
  • Acetyl L-Carnitine
  • Vitamin B-1 (Thiamine)
All of these are available individually. If you decide to try them, try one at a time in tiny, fractional doses and see how you do. Please let us know your results in this topic.

 

I don't know if Dr. Driscoll's theory is correct. This is not a recommendation for her products.

 

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daddybuggaorange

That Parasym Plus has phosphyl Choline in it which effects acetylcholine levels...dangerous?  I relaly want to try phosphatidylserine again but scared to try anything that impacts any neurotransmitter; I guess PS can impact dopamine as well?  

 

I have POTS that started when I came off Klonopin.  They prescribed atenolol which is a beta blocker that gets my heart rate down to where it used to be, but it has some anticholergenic properties, and I definitely have anticholergenic syndrome.  I can't take bentyl or benadryl without a severe, adverse reaction.  I'd like to be off 

 

I was at Mayo clinic last February and failed all 3 of their autonomic nervous function tests while on atenolol.  My POTS seems to come and go.  Some times I can stop taking atenolol for awhile, then the orthostatic hypotension hits, heart rate goes way up, and I have to re-instate on the atenolol.   

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Alpha23

Just wondering if anyone has done a tilt table test to check for autonomic dysfunction. Apparently, they give you a drug to stimulate your heart which worries me a bit. Could doing this test possibly make antidepressant related heart symptoms worse since we are so sensitive to drugs?

 

I'm interested in doing this test because when I stand up after sitting down I get very light headed so suspect I have orthostatic hypotension (postural hypotension). 

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AprilShowers

I had a hospital tilt table test a couple of years ago after some fainting spells. I was taken by a friend and had no after effects. They diagnosed vasovagal syncope and told me not to stand for too long and to drink plenty water to keep my body hydrated as it helps. 

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Alpha23

Hi AprilShowers, did they give you any drugs during the test, and if so was it through an IV?

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Altostrata

As AprilShowers noted, it's important to keep hydrated to keep your blood pressure up.

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AprilShowers

Hi AprilShowers, did they give you any drugs during the test, and if so was it through an IV?

They gave me a drink. I had no after effects. I did have someone with me though so I wasn't driving myself home or anything. 

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virgo43

Dear members. 

I am new to this forum.

My body is showing fight flight response every time I lower the dose.

 

Cns imbalance

Dysautonomia

Hpa axis dysfunction

 

What ever it is called.

I am 100% sure if I taper off fully I will enter into delirium tremans.

 

Please read my posts. Since the day I took meds my life has been difficult very difficult.  Last month was absolute hell.

 

What can I do?

How can the receptors nerves upregulate?

 

I haven't had homeostasis since day one.

 

 

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