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That acid reflux pill may be causing your health problems

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

Admin note: See
 
That acid reflux pill may be causing your health problems

Tips for tapering off stomach acid blockers or PPIs (esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole)

 

Chris Kresser on getting rid of GERD and heartburn
 
Chris Kresser and healing gut problems
 
Combating Acid Reflux May Bring Host of Ills

Heartburn Drugs Linked to Heart Attacks

Acid-Suppressing Drugs Linked to Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Got Milk? You Don't Need It
 




I believe my taking Zantac for a couple of years (for indigestion) caused a vitamin B12 deficiency that weakened my nervous system and greatly exacerbated antidepressant withdrawal syndrome.

If you don't actually have serious acid reflux, you may wish to reduce your drug burden and go off it. To prevent rebound reflux, taper off an acid blocker as soon as possible. My estimate of a good rate is 25% per week. If you get rebound reflux, lower the decrease and take longer to taper off.

If you've been on an acid blocker for any length of time, you may wish to get a vitamin B12 shot before starting your taper, or start supplementing with sublingual B12.

Combating Acid Reflux May Bring Host of Ills
By RONI CARYN RABIN June 25, 2012 nytimes.com

....
Long-term use of the drugs, called proton pump inhibitors, or P.P.I.’s, can make it difficult to absorb some nutrients. ....

As many as four in 10 Americans have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, and many depend on P.P.I.’s like Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium to reduce stomach acid. These are the third highest-selling class of drugs in the United States, after antipsychotics and statins, with more than 100 million prescriptions and $13.9 billion in sales in 2010, in addition to over-the-counter sales.

But in recent years, the Food and Drug Administration has issued numerous warnings about P.P.I.’s, saying long-term use and high doses have been associated with an increased risk of bone fractures and infection with a bacterium called Clostridium difficile that can be especially dangerous to elderly patients. In a recent paper, experts recommended that older adults use the drugs only “for the shortest duration possible.”

Studies have shown long-term P.P.I. use may reduce the absorption of important nutrients, vitamins and minerals, including magnesium, calcium and vitamin B12, and might reduce the effectiveness of other medications, with the F.D.A. warning that taking Prilosec together with the anticlotting agent clopidogrel (Plavix) can weaken the protective effect (of clopidogrel) for heart patients.

Other research has found that people taking P.P.I.’s are at increased risk of developing pneumonia; one study even linked use of the drug to weight gain.

Drug company officials dismiss such reports, saying that they do not prove the P.P.I.’s are the cause of the problems and that many P.P.I. users are older adults who are susceptible to infections and more likely to sustain fractures and have nutritional deficits.

But while using the drugs for short periods may not be problematic, they tend to breed dependency, experts say, leading patients to take them for far longer than the recommended 8 to 12 weeks; some stay on them for life. Many hospitals have been starting patients on P.P.I.’s as a matter of routine, to prevent stress ulcers, then discharging them with instructions to continue the medication at home. Dr. Charlie Baum, head of U.S. Medical Affairs for Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America Inc., said its P.P.I. Dexilant is safe when used according to the prescribed indication of up to six months for maintenance, though many physicians prescribe it for longer.

“Studies have shown that once you’re on them, it’s hard to stop taking them,” said Dr. Shoshana J. Herzig of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. “It’s almost like an addiction.”

P.P.I.’s work by blocking the production of acid in the stomach, but the body reacts by overcompensating and, she said, “revving up production” of acid-making cells. “You get excess growth of those cells in the stomach, so when you unblock production, you have more of the acid-making machinery,” she said.

Moreover, proton pump inhibitors have not been the wonder drugs that experts had hoped for. More widespread treatment of GERD has not reduced the incidence of esophageal cancers. Squamous cell carcinoma, which is associated with smoking, has declined, but esophageal adenocarcinomas, which are associated with GERD, have increased 350 percent since 1970.

“When people take P.P.I.’s, they haven’t cured the problem of reflux,” said Dr. Joseph Stubbs, an internist in Albany, Ga., and a former president of the American College of Physicians. “They’ve just controlled the symptoms.”

And P.P.I.’s provide a way for people to avoid making difficult lifestyle changes, like losing weight or cutting out the foods that cause heartburn, he said. “People have found, ‘I can keep eating what I want to eat, and take this and I’m doing fine,’ ” he said. “We’re starting to see that if you do that, you can run into some risky side effects.”

Many patients may be on the drugs for no good medical reason, at huge cost to the health care system, said Dr. Joel J. Heidelbaugh, a family medicine doctor in Ann Arbor, Mich. When he reviewed medical records of almost 1,000 patients on P.P.I.’s at an outpatient Veterans Affairs clinic in Ann Arbor, he found that only one-third had a diagnosis that justified the drugs. The others seemed to have been given the medications “just in case.”

“We put people on P.P.I.’s, and we ignore the fact that we were designed to have acid in our stomach,” said Dr. Greg Plotnikoff, a physician who specializes in integrative therapy at the Penny George Institute for Health and Healing in Minneapolis.

Stomach acid is needed to break down food and absorb nutrients, he said, as well as for proper functioning of the gallbladder and pancreas. Long-term of use of P.P.I.’s may interfere with these processes, he noted. And suppression of stomach acid, which kills bacteria and other microbes, may make people more susceptible to infections, like C. difficile.

Taking P.P.I.’s, Dr. Plotnikoff said, “changes the ecology of the gut and actually allows overgrowth of some things that normally would be kept under control.”

Stomach acid also stimulates coughing, which helps clear the lungs. Some experts think this is why some patients, especially those who are frail and elderly, face an increased risk of pneumonia if they take P.P.I.’s.

But many leading gastroenterologists are convinced that the benefits of the drugs outweigh their risks. They say the drugs prevent serious complications of GERD, like esophageal and stomach ulcers and peptic strictures, which occur when inflammations causes the lower end of the esophagus to narrow.

The studies that detected higher risks among patients on P.P.I.’s “are statistical analyses of very large patient populations. But how does that relate to you, as one person taking the drug?” said Dr. Donald O. Castell, director of esophageal disorders at the Medical University of South Carolina and an author of the American College of Gastroenterology’s practice guidelines for GERD, who has financial relationships with drug companies that make P.P.I.’s. He added, “You don’t want to throw the baby out with the bathwater.”

Most physicians think that GERD is a side effect of the obesity epidemic, and that lifestyle changes could ameliorate heartburn for many.

“If we took 100 people with reflux and got them to rigidly follow the lifestyle recommendations, 90 wouldn’t need any medication,” Dr. Castell said. “But good luck getting them to do that.”

Edited by Altostrata
updated

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GiaK   
GiaK

I found Chris Kressers work on how to get off and permanently avoid anti acids very helpful.

 

My mother, who was told she needed SURGERY for severe acid reflux also used his advice at my suggestion and she is now off all meds and never needed surgery.

 

This is a link to his page on Heartburn and GERD that includes links to several informative and helpful articles he's written about the science and use of anti acids as well as how to heal the gut and stomach so that one might not ever think they need to take an anti acid again.

 

http://chriskresser.com/heartburn

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Skyler   
Skyler

I found Chris Kressers work on how to get off and permanently avoid anti acids very helpful.

 

My mother, who was told she needed SURGERY for severe acid reflux also used his advice at my suggestion and she is now off all meds and never needed surgery.

 

This is a link to his page on Heartburn and GERD that includes links to several informative and helpful articles he's written about the science and use of anti acids as well as how to heal the gut and stomach so that one might not ever think they need to take an anti acid again.

 

http://chriskresser.com/heartburn

 

Hi Gia, thanks for the post. My 89 yr. old Dad needs to take Nexium because of a severe hereditary diaphragmatic hernia but most people do not need to treat acid reflux with such a heavy duty medication. And my Dad is effected by withdrawal concerns. Periodically, he runs out of the script (he won't let my sister or I intervene until that point, sigh..). Because the acid rebound effect happens within hours of a missed dose, he has severe pain within 24 hours. Now that we are aware of the problem, we ask the pharmacist for for a few days loaner while we contact docs for refills, etc. But we had to learn the hard way as my Dad had no idea what was happening, and thought the severe pain was due to a worsening of the underlying problem, to the point he was considering an unneeded increase in the script.

 

Since then, I have spoken to a number of people who take prescription proton inhibitors, and who have no idea what they have gotten into. For whom it's a matter of being more comfortable during an episode that will pass, and who can be treated by the types of interventions that Chris Kressers describes. Unfortunately, many end up long term because they mistake withdrawal symptoms like my Dad does, as a worsening of the underlying problem. Criminal. Good information.~S

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Jemima   
Jemima

From what I've read, a long term Vitamin B-12 deficiency can result in depression, among other things. Yesterday I started adding a teaspoon of nutritional yeast to one meal a day because I've been dragging around for several weeks with fatigue and apathy, despite sleeping eight to ten hours a night. I feel somewhat perkier after only a day and a half of this. Vitamin B-12 pills are on the way by mail, because I couldn't find any locally that don't contain magnesium stearate, a very questionable ingredient in a lot of vitamins (http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/06/23/whole-food-supplement-dangers.aspx?e_cid=20120623_DNL_art_1)

 

One of the things that bugs me the most is that it's now so difficult to tell what's withdrawal and what's not. I could be dying from appendicitis and probably think it's withdrawal. :angry:

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GiaK   
GiaK

jemima,

 

a suggestion:

 

If you suffer from any hyper-sensitivity be very careful with b-12 supplements...among benzo folks it's a supplement commonly violently reacted to...I'm among those afflicted.

 

if you need it though, it can certainly turn things around in lovely fashion...I've heard those stories too...

 

best of luck.

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

Bumping -- so many people are showing up who are also taking acid blockers or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

 

The vitamin B12 depletion caused by these drugs can make withdrawal more difficult or withdrawal symptoms worse. Only people with extremely serious acid reflux should be on acid blockers for any length of time. Far too many people are taking them, they're another bonanza of unnecessary medication.

 

To prevent rebound reflux, taper off an acid blocker as soon as possible. My estimate of a good rate is 25% per week. If you get rebound reflux, lower the decrease and take longer to taper off.

 

For example, you need to taper Prilosec. To do this, I would open the Prilosec OTC capsule, carefully pour half out, put the capsule back together, and take the other half. Do this for a week. Then pour more out (3/4), take 1/4 capsule for a week. Then stop.

 

If you're taking this kind of prescription Prilosec:

http://www.drugs.com/prilosec.html

You may open the Prilosec delayed-release capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce to make swallowing easier. Swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use. Discard the empty capsule.

If you've been on an acid blocker for any length of time, you may wish to get a vitamin B12 shot before starting your taper, or start supplementing with sublingual B12.

Edited by Altostrata
updated and expanded

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Outshined   
Outshined

If you've been on an acid blocker for any length of time, you may wish to get a vitamin B12 shot before starting your taper, or start supplementing with sublingual B12.

Sorry if I bump this old post.

 

Alto, do you have any tip on the dosage and form of vitamin B12 supplement?

 

I did a search and it seems that methyl-cobalamin should be preferred, since it's more bioavailable than cyano-cobalamin, that is usually found in supplements. It's claimed that it has other benefits but I can't be sure about them since I didn't find any trustful source (and I'm not a physiologist nor a chemist).

 

I have no idea about the dose.

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Outshined   
Outshined

Ok, maybe I should have done a search on this forum and not on the Web :) Thanks Alto.

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Lilu   
Lilu

Attached is a study, from the University of Texas, on the long-term use of Proton Pump Inhibitors. That's drugs such as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Aciphex, Protonix, etc.
 
After being diagnosed with a large gallstone, I was shocked to find out that my chronic use of Nexium, may have contributed not only to the gallstone formation, but to my Chronic Fatigue.  How? Well it turns out that acid-blockers, by the mechanism of a lowered acid environment, prevent the absorbtion of Iron, and other essential vitamins and minerals. 
 
http://www.utexas.edu/pharmacy/divisions/pharmaco/rounds/01-13-12.pdf
 

D. Recent studies raised several concerns regarding the long term usage of PPI

i. Drug interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel (Plavix®)

ii. PPIs may decrease the absorption of calcium, vitamin B12, magnesium and iron

iii. Long term acid suppression may lead to the development of atrophic gastritis which

could be a precursor of cancer

iv. PPIs may be associated with a higher risk of infections

a. Pneumonia and Clostridium difficile (C. diff)

v. Patients on PPIs are at increased risk of fractures

 
In my case, having had Iron Deficiency Anemia for over a decade, and having struggled with fatigue, this was major.  Because despite taking Iron supplements, I was still anemic due to the acid blocker I was taking.
 
The double whammy is that Iron Deficiency also leads to gallstones!  See attached pdf.

Anemia & Gallstones.pdf

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

Thanks for this, Lilu! Another type of drug that should not be taken long-term except in very rare cases.

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Lilu   
Lilu

Thanks for this, Lilu! Another type of drug that should not be taken long-term except in very rare cases.

 

You're welcome.  Just like withdrawal syndrome with antidepressants, I never knew, until recently, that acid-blockers cause rebound acid secretion, to come back even stronger than when you originally had when you started taking an acid reflux medication.  Every time I'd try to quit, I'd have the worst acid pain in my throat, and would just go back on my meds.  It took 3 months for my body to adjust going from a higher to a lower dose!

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mammaP   
mammaP

I've been taking acid blockers for 20 years  :o ! I was given them because meds  

affected my stomach badly. To start I only took them when I needed to but eventually 

all meds affect my stomach and have taken it daily for years. This is food for thought!

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Gastroenterology/GERD/43350

GERD Meds Up Risk of B12 Deficiency
Published: Dec 10, 2013 | Updated: Dec 11, 2013
By Cole Petrochko, Staff Writer, MedPage Today

Action Points

  • Previous and current gastric acid inhibitor use was significantly associated with the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Doses of more than 1.5 proton pump inhibitor pills per day were more strongly associated with vitamin B12 deficiency than were doses of less than 0.75 pills per day.

Patients taking prescription anti-reflux medications had significantly higher odds of a vitamin B12 deficiency, researchers found.

Among patients diagnosed with a vitamin B12 deficiency, a 2 or more years' prescription for proton pump inhibitors (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.58-1.73) or histamine 2 receptor antagonists (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.17-1.34) was significantly associated with risk for the deficiency, according to Douglas Corley, MD, PhD, of Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, Calif., and colleagues.

Patients who received more than 1.5 pills daily of proton pump inhibitors had significantly greater vitamin B12 deficiency than those who received doses smaller than 0.75 pills per day (P=0.007 for interaction), they wrote online in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Vitamin B12 deficiency can have a detrimental impact across cognitive function in older patients, while long-term -- across years -- use of proton pump inhibitors have been associated with osteoporotic fracture risks.

The authors noted that other gastric acid suppressants can lead to malabsorption of vitamin B12, though prior research has not evaluated the impact of long-term exposure. To test this, they conducted a nested case-control study of 25,956 patients with an incident diagnoses of vitamin B12 deficiency at a single center and compared that group with 184,199 control patients who were not deficient.

Patients were all adults, were members of the Kaiser Permanente Northern California integrated healthcare system for at least 1 year, and had a diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency at baseline. Deficiency was defined as diagnostic coding for deficiency in the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision as pernicious anemia, other vitamin B12 deficiency anemia, center-specified vitamin B12 deficiency, or specific text diagnoses, as well as an abnormally low serum measure or a new and at least 6-month supply of injectable supplements.
....
Confounders included conditions associated with vitamin B12 deficiency -- such as dementia, diabetes, and thyroid disease. They also evaluated health service utilization and whether other medications patients used were associated with deficiency.

Patients who were deficient were mostly female (57.4%), 60 or older (67.2%), and were white (68.4%). Some 12% had received proton pump inhibitors for 2 or more years, 4.2% received histamine 2 receptor antagonists for 2 or more years, and 83.8% had received neither medication.

Among controls, 7.2% had received proton pump inhibitors for 2 or more years, 3.2% had received histamine 2 receptor antagonists for 2 or more years, and 89.6% had received neither anti-reflux drug.

Longer duration of proton pump inhibitors increased associations with vitamin B12 deficiency, .... "the strength of the association between proton pump inhibitor use and vitamin B12 deficiency diminished after discontinuation of use."

Patients younger than 30 had a stronger association with deficiency (OR 8.12, 95% CI 3.36-19.59), which decreased with age. Women were also at greater odds for deficiency than men.
....

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Barbarannamated   
Barbarannamated

When in hospital for bradycardia, I was *offered* a PPI "just in case" any meds bothered my stomach. I declined. Recently, the same offer was made to my father (I helped him decline).

 

Just as an FYI, they are being pushed in hospitals as prophylactic therapy.

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

Very few people actually need PPIs.

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UnfoldingSky   
UnfoldingSky

I have an interesting story about a miraculous cure I was once given for acid reflux when I was younger. Once I went to a market where I was living and my boyfriend approached a booth there being run by an elderly man who sold supplements and herbs.  He started a conversation with the man, who eventually noticed me as well.  He said I didn't look very healthy and asked me to sit down so he could run some non-invasive tests on me.  Normally I would have said no but that day I was so exhausted I decided to humor him.  I remember he had me do a litmus test of my saliva and he looked into my eyes.  He then asked about my health and I said I had chronic reflux (and some other problems.)  So he offered me several bottles of liquid medicines.  But I really didn't want them and had very little extra money to spend so I told him I couldn't afford them.

 

"Take them," he said, "and just pay me back when you can."

 

Not wanting to seem rude, I took the bottles.  But when I got home I was leery about ingesting them.  The bottles were not marked, and I had no idea what they contained.  One of them smelled like turpentine and was not properly sealed.  I wondered if maybe he was running an elaborate ruse to poison people (okay so my imagination was a bit overactive.)  But the chronic reflux I had was getting worse all the time and the treatments doctors were offering were not helping; it was so bad at points that I had severe nausea from it, and had to sleep propped up on several pillows. So finally after a lot of hand wringing I decided to take the bottle of liquid he said would help the reflux...

 

And, would you believe it, it actually worked. 

 

So I went back to the market and paid him a bit of the money I owed (I was quite poor at the time.)  Then I didn't go back for a bit; when I finally did go back though the man was gone.  No one knew where he had gone or what his name was; even the vendors around him seemed to know nothing about him. He had not only simply vanished; it was like he had never existed to begin with.

 

I never did find out what became of him, nor did I pay him back the rest of the money.  I am still so very grateful for what he did, as the problem never once recurred.  I only wish I had had the chance to pay him and that I found out what was in that bottle....

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cymbaltawithdrawal5600   
cymbaltawithdrawal5600

What an amazing story, Sky. Almost like he appeared there just for you. Shivvers.

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UnfoldingSky   
UnfoldingSky

What an amazing story, Sky. Almost like he appeared there just for you. Shivvers.

 

I know, it was so neat....

 

Not to get totally off topic, but, it reminds me of a story my Mom tells (better than I do), not connected to healing but about another man who helped out and then disappeared....

 

When she was young once at Christmas her family was having a Christmas party.  My Mom has lots of siblings, and other members of the family and some family friends were invited as well, so the house was pretty full.  Not long after dinner the doorbell rang and when my grandparents answered it they found a man dressed up like Santa Claus.  So they invited him in--having no idea who the man was. 

 

He sat down, took present requests from the kids, played the piano while everyone sang and generally entertained everyone, I believe declined to be served any food, then left as the night wound down.

 

They never did figure out who he was...

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btdt   
btdt

PPIs cripple the immune system.

Could you please tell me more about this or supply some links.. thanks B 

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LexAnger   
LexAnger

In case this has not be brought up elsewhere for everyone's attention, pip can increase the concentration of Ssri you are taking up tp 50% more. This is based on a controlled clinical study and the paper was published in a medical journal. Unfortunately, I could not find that link anymore. That means if you are on both, when tapering, the reduction rate is actually higher than what you think on the Ssri dose decrease.

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btdt   
btdt

In case this has not be brought up elsewhere for everyone's attention, pip can increase the concentration of Ssri you are taking up tp 50% more. This is based on a controlled clinical study and the paper was published in a medical journal. Unfortunately, I could not find that link anymore. That means if you are on both, when tapering, the reduction rate is actually higher than what you think on the Ssri dose decrease.

Proton pump inhibitor double the concentration of say Effexor so rather than taking 150 mg I was taking 300?  sure would like to see that article

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btdt   
btdt

especially since an increase in E from 150 caused mania and the dose that caused mania in me was much lower than 300mg.. How do he PPI affect the immune system

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

I am finding a ginger-turmeric capsule to work very well controlling my urps!

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alexjuice   
alexjuice

 

PPIs cripple the immune system.

Could you please tell me more about this or supply some links.. thanks B 

 

The acidity of the gastric juices literally destroys most microscopic pathogens (or their eggs/cysts). PPI "turn off" stomach acid "pumps" and without robust stomach acid it is not possible to efficiently eradicate pathogens. Because of this more infections result including viral, bacterial, and parasitic. In fact, PPIs can even lead to death by promoting serious c. difficile infections. There is bountiful info via Dr Google on the immune damaging aspect of PPI use.

 

 

Risk of infection - both long-term and short-term PPI use have been linked to a higher risk of serious infections, such as diarrhea caused by the C. difficile bacterium, as well as community-acquired pneumonia. None of the PPI medications have any information on pneumonia risk, while only Nexium, Vimovo and Prolosex have anything about C. difficile infection risk.

https://www.google.com/#q=proton+pump+inhibitors+immune+infection

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

Your stomach acid is there for a good reason.

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btdt   
btdt

In case this has not be brought up elsewhere for everyone's attention, pip can increase the concentration of Ssri you are taking up tp 50% more. This is based on a controlled clinical study and the paper was published in a medical journal. Unfortunately, I could not find that link anymore. That means if you are on both, when tapering, the reduction rate is actually higher than what you think on the Ssri dose decrease.

If you ever find the link send it to me I have use for it.

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btdt   
btdt

 

 

PPIs cripple the immune system.

Could you please tell me more about this or supply some links.. thanks B 

 

The acidity of the gastric juices literally destroys most microscopic pathogens (or their eggs/cysts). PPI "turn off" stomach acid "pumps" and without robust stomach acid it is not possible to efficiently eradicate pathogens. Because of this more infections result including viral, bacterial, and parasitic. In fact, PPIs can even lead to death by promoting serious c. difficile infections. There is bountiful info via Dr Google on the immune damaging aspect of PPI use.

 

 

Risk of infection - both long-term and short-term PPI use have been linked to a higher risk of serious infections, such as diarrhea caused by the C. difficile bacterium, as well as community-acquired pneumonia. None of the PPI medications have any information on pneumonia risk, while only Nexium, Vimovo and Prolosex have anything about C. difficile infection risk.

https://www.google.com/#q=proton+pump+inhibitors+immune+infection

 

Thank you.

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LexAnger   
LexAnger

Sorry I just realized the response I sent long time ago re. The link forr ppi impact on Ssri must have been sent to different forum. ,y apology.

 

Anyway, I tried hard but could not find it anymore. Even though, I happened just experienced myself the proof of it. 4 weeks ago I was able to stop the ppi after 16 yrs on it and immediately experienced typical WD of lexapro giving that nothing else I changed. The WD was so severe that I had to increase the lex for about 30% of what I have been taking for months. All symptoms stopped on day one of the increase.

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SouthernFreeze   
SouthernFreeze

oh man! i been on this stuff about ten years. I only take it about once in every two days now though.

 

I don't think i could relate to the fact that it increased ssri dose, i'm sure i would have noticed by now being that i only have a reflux pill every second even third day sometimes. I will see though as i think i will stop them entirely after reading this.

 

Ginger and cayenne pepper i put in to capsules has seemed to help in long term use, also only having citrus before meals ( and other things i can't remember but have written down somewhere). I think everybody's different but a naturopath can review your eating patterns and then make a diet or just change the order in which you eat your food to help stop reflux and help absorb nutrients. That's what i did (well i only have only really been sticking to a few of the recommended things) and it makes big difference, hence why i cut down from taking about two a day to one every other day .

 

I say one every two days, but it's really just when it gets real bad really

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btdt   
btdt

I do well with capsules containing half ginger and half turmeric.

 

See this new paper in Journals about omeprazole blocking metabolism of citalopram http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/6659-rocha-2010-omeprazole-preferentially-inhibits-the-metabolism-of-s-citalopram-in-healthy-volunteers/

"omeprazole blocking metabolism of citalopram"

That is interesting I was talking both in 2004 when I ended up in emerg with a reaction ... nobody understood or could explain.  My doctor switched drugs...eventually to pariet.. which was not so great either but did not have the same effects. I suggest getting off ppi drugs asap taper 

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LexAnger   
LexAnger

Another thing interesting I observed and reasoned with some online search: I tried many times stopping ppi before I started the first ever pill of Ssri and all failed within 1 day or less. So it is of surprising to me for this time success. Some papers states that Ssri use can increase Your body ph value, so I kind of reasoned Ssri was helping the ppi withdrawal somehow.

 

Anyway, since I already stopped, I figure I should just stabilize the Ssri WD by increasing its dose balancing the original impact of the ppi, the. Taper from there with the multiplying factor of ppi in the bay. I also hope my sensitivity to the dose change will decrease a bit as I'm now dealing with the Ssri dose only.

 

Sometimes I got this feeling about my life living like this every hour and minute calculating everything while on content and random set of pains and suffering, wondering how I got stuck in here and how much more effort it worth. I'm sorry for saying this but it comes to my mind often times.

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thisismyname   
thisismyname

 PPI's are best avoided if you take antidepressants. I had a severe reaction to the combination and It made me feel like I was "existing" but not actually living. I would get strange periods of time where I was a zombie. Another symptom was a lack of interest in women. I literally forgot about sex. Afterwords I got ED and It still hasn't recovered but Its better than it was. 

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LexAnger   
LexAnger

Hi thisismyname, I am glad to hear your validation on the effect of combining ppi and Ssri. Can you explain what you meant by saying it's better after ED? What is better and after what? Per my experience, ppi won't make you feel like zombie or has sex relted side effects. Those are typical effects of Ssri. Thanks!

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