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DGL - Deglycyrrhizinated licorice

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alexjuice

Not sure where to post this but, I experienced some interesting effects after taking DGL, a licorice supplement. I took it as a trial for GI inflammation. I experienced some some mood effects remisiscent of taking my antidepressant. I felt weak as well and even felt a bit of impulsiveness, as drinking alcohol addictively had some appeal.

 

I only took the recommended dose for two days.

 

I googled and found this:

 

http://www.raysahelian.com/licorice.html

 

Inhibition of serotonin re-uptake by licorice constituents.

J Mol Neurosci. 2003.

The aim of this study was to test the effect of compounds of the licorice isoflavan and isoflavene groups, subclasses of the flavonoids family, on serotonin re-uptake and to compare the results with the effect of other known phytoestrogens like genistein and daidzein to relate the activity of these compounds to their structure. The results demonstrated that the isoflavans glabridin and 4'-O-methylglabridin (4'-OMeG) and the isoflavene glabrene inhibited serotonin re-uptake, whereas resorcinol, the isoflavan 2'-O-methylglabridin (2'-OMeG), and the isoflavones genistein and daidzein were inactive. In conclusion, this study showed that several licorice isoflavans are unique phytoestrogens, which like estradiol, affects the serotonergic system and inhibits serotonin re-uptake and, thus, potentially may be beneficial for mild to moderate depression in pre- and postmenopausal women.

 

Which I found interesting. I've put the cork back in my DGL bottle due to these effects but thought others may be interested in the information. So I am passing along.

 

Perhaps the wrong place though?

 

Alex

Edited by Altostrata
Updated title

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Altostrata

MOD NOTE:  Please see Alto's follow up post.

 

DGL is an adrenal stimulant. This might be very bad for a lot of people with withdrawal syndrome.

 

However, people who have true adrenal insufficiency seem to like it.

 

(Maybe put this in Symptoms?)

 

Edited by ChessieCat
Added Mod Note

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alexjuice

(Maybe should just remain buried. Not sure of its usefulness here on the next day after posting.)

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Brandy

Alex, deglycyrrhized licorice interacts with some of the benzo CYP450 substrates, albeit much more weakly than with things like blood thinners, which I believe is the biggie.

 

So tired now I can barely think so don't remember whether they induce or inhibit, and too tired to look it up. But it might have affected your benzo levels ever so slightly. Especially give your (and my!) sensitivities to meds.

 

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz. (Gotta get some sleep now!)

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Altostrata

I misspoke. DGL is the okay licorice, an active ingredient, glycyrrhizin, has been removed.

 

http://www.truestarhealth.com/Notes/2122006.html

According to test tube studies, glycyrrhizin has anti-inflammatory actions and may inhibit the breakdown of the cortisol produced by the body.

I had a bad experience with the glycyrrhizin-containing type.

 

DGL contains no glycyrrhizin but contains the innocent flavonoids:

Licorice flavonoids, as well as the closely related chalcones, help heal digestive tract cells. They are also potent antioxidants and work to protect liver cells. In test tubes, the flavonoids have been shown to kill Helicobacter pylori, the bacteria that causes most ulcers and stomach inflammation.3 However, it is unclear whether this action applies to the use of oral licorice for the treatment of ulcers in humans.

 

....

Licorice products that include glycyrrhizin may increase blood pressure and cause water retention.10 Some people are more sensitive to this effect than others. Long-term intake (more than two to three weeks) of products containing more than 1 gram of glycyrrhizin (the amount in approximately 10 grams of root) daily is the usual amount required to cause these effects. Consumption of 7 grams licorice (containing 500 mg glycyrrhizin) per day for seven days has been shown to decrease serum testosterone levels in healthy men by blocking the enzymes needed to synthesize testosterone.11 However, in another study, a similar amount of licorice had only a small and statistically insignificant effect on testosterone levels.12 As a result of these possible side effects, long-term intake of high levels of glycyrrhizin is discouraged and should only be undertaken if prescribed by a qualified healthcare professional. Consumption of plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables to increase potassium intake is recommended to help decrease the chance of side effects. According to the German Commission E monograph, licorice is inadvisable for pregnant women as well as for people with liver and kidney disorders.13

 

De-glycyrrhizinated licorice extracts do not cause these side effects since they contain no glycyrrhizin.

The University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/licorice-000262.htm

 

People who regularly take large amounts of [glycyrrhizin-containing] licorice -- more than 20 g/day -- may raise blood levels of the hormone aldosterone, which can cause serious side effects, including headache, high blood pressure, and heart problems. For people who already have high blood pressure or heart or kidney disease, as little as 5 g/day can cause these side effects. Further studies are needed.

 

Available Forms:

 

Licorice products are made from peeled and unpeeled dried root. There are powdered and finely cut root preparations made for teas, tablets, and capsules, as well as liquid extracts. Some licorice extracts do not contain glycyrrhizin. These extracts are known as deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), and do not seem to have the undesired side effects of other forms of licorice. Some studies suggest DGL may be better for stomach or duodenal ulcers. DGL may offer protection against ulcer formation when taken with aspirin.

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Brandy

Just saw Alto's last post in this thread, and now I'm questioning what I'd been told about DGL and benzo substrates. I posted:

 

Alex, deglycyrrhized licorice interacts with some of the benzo CYP450 substrates, albeit much more weakly than with things like blood thinners, which I believe is the biggie.

 

Now I'm not at all sure what I posted is correct. I had once been advised (by a health care professional) not to take DGL because I was on benzos.

 

Really not sure, now that I think about it.

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GiaK

DGL helped me heal my gut but I've always minimized and now avoid it due to possibly effecting estrogen...still overall it had a therapeutic effect for me with no psychoactive side-effects at all

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Roxyrich

I was suffering, quite badly from gerd , so I looked for natural remedies on the net.I came across dgl.
It said all the reactive agents had been removed, so I was gonna try it.after the first day I felt ok.woke next morning anxious, but just thought it was a wave. Took it that morning and was still anxious. But before I went to bed that night I took another, bang . 15 minutes later I was hit by waves of anxiety and akathesia, couldn't sleep and today I'm no better. I badly need support. I'm crawling out of my skin and scared this won't stop.

Edited by KarenB
merged similar topics

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Altostrata

It will stop, but clearly there is an additive in your DGL to which you are sensitive. Does it have an artificial sweetener? That could do it.

 

Try to drink lots of water, to wash whatever it was out of your system.

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Roxyrich

Thanks alto it's got

Sorbitol xylitol

Dgl extract

Bulking agent microcrystalline cellulose

Glycine

Steric acid

Sillicol dioxide

Magnesium stearate

Maltodextrin

Aniseed oil

I suppose it could have been any of these I got it from Holland and Barrett.

I was also taking bicarbonate of soda, don't know if this hurt the mix.

I'm feeling better today, but shell shocked .

Guess I'll have to put up with the heartburn.

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Roxyrich

Are sweeteners known for reactions, I would like to avoid them in the future.

Do you think I have set my recovery back or when this passes will I be the same as before.

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ChessieCat

Hi Roxy,

 

Doing a bit of Googling and found this (http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-pres/m-1311775530/) admittedly this reaction was to non-DGL, but if you CNS is already sensitised, then it may be way you reacted the way you did.

 

Yaamon wrote:

 

"I recently took some Licorice Root and my liver area hurt bad with shooting pains for hours.  I won't touch the stuff again.  Couldn't find any reference to this anywhere on the Web.

Also, I have had a Doctor prescribe non-DGL licorice (the potent stuff) in the past and it causes my adrenals to go bananas (in a bad way).  Its like having way, way too much caffeine.

I did find out that Licorice is a classic Chinese medicine herb.  I suspect from other experience that I do best on Northern European based items, and this adds to that suspicion."

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Altostrata

Some people react to Sorbitol xylitol.

 

It would be a frightening thing if the ingredients claimed "Dgl extract" but actually included regular licorice which, as Chessie noted, can cause quite serious side effects.

 

I just found out a good digestive aid is 2 parts sodium bicarbonate to 1 part potassium bicarbonate (used in beer- and wine-making; may be available at the pharmacist). Take ½ teaspoon completely dissolved in warm water; you can take a second dose 20-30 minutes later if needed. Do not take more than 2 doses in 24 hours, it's a lot of sodium.

 

The potassium bicarb is better for you than all that sodium.

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Roxyrich

Thanks alto, I'm gonna get past this first, and keep it simple, my head still feels agitated, and I have a scared feeling of unease.

I think it will take a while to get past this .

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Altostrata

These days, I find DGL to be very handy when experiencing indigestion, particularly acid burps, which I have occasionally.

 

12 years after going off Paxil, my system is not nearly as sensitive as it once was.

 

From ttp://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/licorice
 

Quote

 

Licorice that has the active ingredient of glycyrrhiza can have serious side effects. Another type of licorice, called DGL or deglycyrrhizinated licorice, does not seem to have the same side effects and is sometimes used to treat peptic ulcers, canker sores, and reflux (GERD). Practitioners still sometimes suggest whole licorice for cough, asthma, and other breathing problems. Topical preparations are used for eczema and other skin problems.


 

 

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