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Altostrata

Tips for tapering off Lexapro (escitalopram)

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Altostrata

aka Cipralex, Seroplex, Lexamil, Lexam

As with all psychiatric drugs, Lexapro must be tapered for safe discontinuation.
 
Lexapro comes in 5, 10, and 20mg tablets and as a liquid suspensiion. It is available as a generic. Its half-life is 27–32 hours http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17375980

In the UK, Lundbeck's version, Cipralex http://sweden.lundbeck.com/Sweden/vardpersonal/lakemedel/bipacksedlar/pdf/Cipralex_bipacksedel_ENG.pdf , comes in the same tablet dosages and in liquid form http://xpil.medicines.org.uk/ViewPil.aspx?DocID=21927

In Canada, Lundbeck's Cipralex comes in 5, 10, 15, 20 mg tablets http://www.lundbeck.com/upload/ca/en/files/pdf/product_monograph/Cipralex_PM_20%20March%202012_MKT_E_CLN.pdf (PDF).

Official US information:

From http://www.drugs.com/pro/escitalopram-tablets.html
The liver enzymes represented by P450 CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 are the primary avenues of metabolization.

Following a single oral dose (20 mg tablet) of escitalopram, peak blood levels occur at about 5 hours. Absorption of escitalopram is not affected by food.

 
From the FDA-mandated US package insert (PDF):
 

Discontinuation of Treatment with Lexapro
During marketing of Lexapro and other SSRIs and SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), there have been spontaneous reports of adverse events occurring upon discontinuation of these drugs, particularly when abrupt, including the following: dysphoric mood, irritability, agitation, dizziness, sensory disturbances (e.g., paresthesias such as electric shock sensations), anxiety, confusion, headache, lethargy, emotional lability, insomnia, and hypomania. While these events are generally self-limiting, there have been reports of serious discontinuation symptoms.

Patients should be monitored for these symptoms when discontinuing treatment with Lexapro. A gradual reduction in the dose rather than abrupt cessation is recommended whenever possible. If intolerable symptoms occur following a decrease in the dose or upon discontinuation of treatment, then resuming the previously prescribed dose may be considered. Subsequently, the physician may continue decreasing the dose but at a more gradual rate [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)].

 
Special considerations
A significant characteristic of Lexapro is that milligram for milligram, it is much stronger than other SSRIs. Chemically, Lexapro is a variation of Celexa; the molecule was re-engineered to be patentable as Celexa's patent was about to expire. The streamlined molecule is a more potent SSRI, 2 to 4 times stronger than others. (Wikipedia has a good explanation of this at https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Escitalopram.)

However, many doctors are unaware that escitalopram is stronger than other SSRIs and dose it as though it were the same strength. Although the so-called usual starting dose of escitalopram, 10mg, is equivalent to 20mg-30mg or more of, for example, paroxetine (Paxil), your doctor may have moved you to an even higher dose. If you are taking 20mg of escitalopram, you are taking a hefty dose of an SSRI.

If you are taking 5mg, it's not tiny, it's equivalent to 10-20mg Paxil or Celexa.

Consequently, when you taper off escitalopram, you should be careful to decrease by small amounts, as each drop is magnified by escitalopram's extra potency. If you find withdrawal symptoms from a 10% decrease to be too difficult, after 3-4 weeks decrease by a smaller amount.

Cold-turkeying off Lexapro is not a good idea. It's like throwing your brain off a cliff.

Reduce by 10% per month to start
The 10% rule holds for Lexapro, just like other psychiatric drugs: Reduce by 10% per month, calculated on the last dosage. (The amount of the reduction gets progressively smaller.)

See Why taper by 10% of my dosage?

Cutting up tablets
Although 5mg tablets are available, if you are taking 20mg Lexapro, a drop to 15mg would be a 25% decrease. This is a larger decrease than the 10% recommended.

If you wish to try cutting up tablets, they can be cut up with a pill splitter like other medications in tablet form. Keep the pieces you don't use in a clean pill bottle labeled with the dosage for future use.

Reducing with a combination of tablets and liquid
If you are taking, for example, 15mg, and want to decrease by 10% (1.5mg), you can take one 10mg tablet and 3.5mg in the liquid form for a total of 13.5mg.

Titrating using liquid formulation
Using the liquid form is the best way to control the amount of each decrease. The US formulation provides 5 mg per 5 mL (amounting to 1mg of the medication in a milliliter of the liquid, or 1mg:1mL).

From http://www.hipaaspace.com/Medical_Billing/Coding/National.Drug.Codes/0456-2101-08
 

Liquid Lexapro
NDC Code 0456-2101-08 <-- this is the order code
Package Description 240 mL in 1 BOTTLE
Proprietary Name Lexapro
Non Proprietary Name ESCITALOPRAM OXALATE
Dosage Form Name LIQUID
Labeler Name Forest Laboratories, Inc.
Substance Name ESCITALOPRAM OXALATE
Strength Number 5
Strength Unit mg/5mL

 

The NDC code 0456-2101-08 is the US order code for the liquid.

 

You can measure out dosages under 10mg by using a 5mL or 10mL oral syringe, see http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/235-tapering-techniques/page__view__findpost__p__2607

The 10mL oral syringe has markings that enable measuring out amounts as small as .20mL.

If you are at 5mg, for example, use a 10 milliliter oral syringe to measure a 10% decrease, i.e. .5mg. Subtracting .5mg from 5mg would give you a reduced dose of 4.5mg.

If you need to measure an even smaller fraction of a milligram, use a 1 milliliter oral syringe, see http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/235-tapering-techniques/page__view__findpost__p__2284

NOTE: In the UK, the liquid form is available at a 10mg:1mL or 20mg:1mL concentration -- very inconvenient for tapering. One version of the liquid form is Cipralex from Lundbeck.

To take 1mg of the 10:1 liquid, use the small slim 1mL oral syringe to take 0.1mL (one-tenth milliliter). The 1mL oral syringe has 10 ticks within .1mL, enabling taking .01mL (one-hundreth milliliter) or, given the 10:1 concentration, .1mg (one-tenth milligram) escitalopram.

This information from Lundbeck, a manufacturer of escitalopram drops in Europe, http://www.medicines.org.uk/EMC/medicine/21976/SPC/Cipralex+5,+10+and+20+mg+film-coated+tablets+and+20+mg+ml+oral+drops,+solution/ suggests the liquid form can be diluted with water:

Cipralex oral drops, solution: A bottle with dropper applicator or an oral syringe may be used for administration. The oral syringe bears a graduation in mg referring to the escitalopram dose.

Cipralex oral drops, solution can be mixed with water, orange juice or apple juice.

 
Since water is part of the original formulation, it is unlikely additional water will cause the dilution to degrade. However, being exposed to light, etc. may do this, so it is unclear how long a diluted solution will last in potency.

Do-it-yourself liquid
People report that they can make their own liquid from Lexapro tablets and water.

It is soluble in water, see http://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB01175 -- stability (shelf-life of dilution) is unknown.

See How to make a liquid from tablets or capsules

 

Using a combination of tablets or capsules and liquid

Rather than switch directly to an all-liquid dose, you may wish to take part of your dose in liquid and part in lower-dose tablets or capsules, gradually converting to all liquid as you get to lower dosages. This can be very convenient and reduce any problems switching from one form of the drug to another.

 

Switching to Prozac
The risks of this method may not be worth switching from Lexapro to Prozac. This is usually used for medications with shorter half-lives than Lexapro. If you want to try this, make sure you consult a doctor who has done it many times and knows what he or she is doing.

Edited by Altostrata
updated

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turtleboots

THANK YOU for this information! Good to know! It may explain why I have been unable to withdraw from Lexapro (currently at 3 mgs liquid per day). My last arrogant and ignorant psychiatrist (the only kind I've ever known) said I could just bump my dose back up if I started having withdrawal symptoms after a decrease in dosagee, yet doing that led to another slew of new and severe symptoms that took the better part of a year to resolve. WHY don't the doctors that take our health into their hands - and get paid handsomely for it - know these things? WHERE IS THE ACCOUNTABILITY?

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Altostrata

You said it, turtleboots! Welcome. I can tell you're going to be great at DIY Editorials.

 

When you have a chance, please introduce yourself in the Introductions forum.

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blackjacklv

Hi everyone,

 

This is my first post here (besides the intro section) and was hoping to pick some of your brains! So I did a ton of research on here and the internet about how I want to taper off my 10 mg of Lexapro (Generic: escitalopram) and have come up with a plan to talk to my Dr. about this afternoon when I go in. I am on 10mg and want to do the 10% taper for a least the first couple of months, but then I had to figure out how I would get to the 9mg initally. It looks like on here there has been the suggestion to use the liquid version to get an exact amount. I figured that I would just do a 5 mg pill and do the liquid to make up the other 4 mg, but talking to my pharmacy and my insurance carrier I have learned that is not allowed. I would have to do all liquid or all pills. I would prefer to do the liquid to be exact, but wanted to find out what others have done?

 

I also got lucky and found out that the generic liquid version of Lexapro (escitalopram) was just released a couple of days ago so this will make the process cheaper if I do the liquid. If I do the pills then I would be having to split a 5 mg pill.

 

Any thoughts or experience?

 

Thanks!

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Altostrata

If the liquid is covered, get the liquid. It enables you to very carefully calibrate your tapering.

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strawberry17

If you can get liquid definately do the liquid, I find I get really accurate consistent measurements with my syringe and it seems so much easier than trying to shave and weigh tablets etc

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Nikki

Hi...

 

I did taper from Lexapro and was very sensitive to it. In the beginning I did liquid and pills. Then just liquid. Trust me, it is alot more accurate.

 

You do not have to do a 10% taper method. If you are very sensitive you an drop by droplets or in other words much smaller drops than 10%.

 

The pharmaceutical companies and the insurance companies work against us, not for us it seems.

Things have changed alot over the years.

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bubbles

Hi

 

I agree about the liquid. My experience was with Lexapro, not a generic, but with the liquid Lexapro (10mg) you can get very tiny drops (0.1mg).

 

I started at 20mg and had a sample pack of 10mg pills to go with the liquid get me started with the taper. I did try breaking a 20mg in half but couldn't get the precision I wanted - they didn't break perfectly evenly and I did want to keep the dose uniform so I abandoned that. For me it was easier to just do the liquid and not mess with the pills.

 

Best wishes with your taper

Bubbles

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blackjacklv

Thank you everyone! I decided to do the liquid since it sounded like it was much easier from you all and started on Monday. I just dropped 1 mg and have been feeling fine. I haven't noticed anything. How long will it take to notice the drop if I am going to? How long should I stay here before dropping another 1 mg? 4 weeks seems like such a long time.

 

BTW - The liquid tastes horrible! Any suggestions on taking it?

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bubbles

Yes, the liquid tastes vile. I wasn't going to mention that... I got used to it after a while.

 

B

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Altostrata

Shoot it into your mouth fast and follow with a swallow of water or fruit juice.

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Lilu

If you are at 5mg, for example, use a 10 milliliter oral syringe to measure a 10% decrease, i.e. .5mg. Subtracting .5mg from 5mg would give you a reduced dose of 4.5mg.

If you need to measure an even smaller fraction of a milligram, use a 1 milliliter oral syringe, see http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/235-tapering-techniques/page__view__findpost__p__2284

 

Ok, so I did some math, and I get multiple decimal points when I calculate 10% of last dose.  From 5 mg of Lexapro, the first 10% is 4.5. That should be easy enough to measure.  But then the next 10% is 4.05, and the next is 3.645.  How can I possibly measure this with a syringe?  Do I round the numbers off?  Do I use TWO syringes - one at 5 ml and another one at 1 ml?

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Altostrata

Round off to the lower dose. Combine syringes as you prefer.

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Lilu

So, I told my doctor that Lexapro and/or withdrawal is making me very tired and drowsy all the time.  And she told me to take it twice daily instead of once daily.  Do any of you have experience with this?

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RedTara

Hi Shooting Star,  I don't know the answer to your question about fatigue but do have some information about generic lexapro dosing options

that relates to earlier discussions here.

 

I found that one can buy compounded Lexapro at the compounded pharmacys in the specific dose you / I am on.  I am on 7 mg right now

having tapered down from 10 in the last period of time and when I'm ready I have already a prescription thats filled of 6 mg of compounded

generic lexapro.  Its pretty handy but a little more expensive and its seems most insurance companies do pay for compounding pharmacies.

You just have to call around your area and speak to the various compounding pharmacys.  I think the price can vary as well from compounding

pharmacy to compounding pharmacy.  

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findingme

can a 5 mg escitalopram be cut in half ?

I've been on 20mg's, and wanted to follow the Harvard guidelines which was a 5mg first taper, but after reading all these posts , I 'm thinking I shouldn't taper by more than 2.5 the first time ?

would appreciate any feedback, as I'm starting to get really freaked out about my attempt to do this

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Altostrata

Lexapro comes in a liquid, this makes tapering by small amounts such as 10% much easier.

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Jemima

I wouldn't recommend cutting the 5 mg. pill in half.  At that low a dose, accuracy is really important, plus going from 5 mg. to 2.5 mg. is too big a cut.  (I know from personal experience as this is what I did - on my doctor's advice.)  Here's an article on how to make your own liquid:

 

How To Make Your Own Liquid from Tablets or Capsules

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findingme

Hi Jemima,

I read the explanations about creating your own liquid, and it makes the process seem like a full time job... isn't there some easier way to do this ? I'm getting pretty stressed about this ... thought the dosing reductions would be a lot easier . .. yuck ... now I'm staring to rethink the whole thing... but in my heart I know the antidepressants are messing with my brain ....I've got to keep this simple or I'll never be able to do it ....

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Lilu

There's no reason to make your own Lexapro liquid.  I just asked my Doc to prescribe it, and it's available as a generic. Also I asked the pharmacist to color it red so that i can see it better in the syringe.  I also really really didn't want to deal with liquid meds and syringes, but after quitting cold turkey and going bonkers for two weeks, i saw that i had no choice.  Don't worry, once you get the hang of measuring the liquid, it becomes a no brainer.

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Jemima

Getting the liquid, generic Lexapro is definitely the best way to go if your doctor is cooperative.  Thanks, Lilu.

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CFSBoomer

I'm planning on obtaining some liquid Lexapro soon,  to begin my taper. I've confirmed that my pharmacy has liquid form. They want $340. a bottle, that's a 1 liter bottle with 1 gram dissolved in it, so 1ml = 1mg as I understand it.  100 mg in a bottle, I believe they said. That's $3.40 a miligram. About twice what my pill price is, but the stuff is priceless when you're addicted to it.  I read above Lilu says it comes in generic. I forgot to ask them. 

 

My question is: Is there a chart showing the 10% reduction doses?  or is there a math diagram that would help me calculate my tapering? 

 

I need to start backwards from 2.5 mg.

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Altostrata

If the cost is prohibitive, you can make your own liquid, see instructions in post #1 in this topic.

 

A calculator is handy for calculating 10% decreases, or 90% of current dosage. 10% of 2.5mg is .25mg, resulting in a dose of 2.25mg.

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Lilu

I'm finding it very tricky to taper once I went past the 1.8 ml mark. Going from 5 ml to 2 ml was a breeze. Especially after my doctor recommended that I divide my dose and take the liquid in the AM and PM.   Even tapering by more than 10% at times. Up to 16% did not cause withdrawal symptoms for me, until... I went past 2ml. 

         Once I went to taking .9 ml in am/pm, all the symptoms of antidepressant withdrawal started: insomnia (not being able to fall asleep at night, no matter how sleepy I am); anger flareups, depression, drowsiness, irritability, blurred vision, and obsessive thinking.  Ugh...I hate to have to go even slower than 10%, as it is, tapering at 10% will put me at the end of May at the finish line.

 

So I decided to go back to taking the full dose in the morning to see if this would offset the insomnia.  It did.  But then I started waking up at 1 or 2 am and unable to fall asleep for a couple of hours.  So, my doctor suggested that I continue to split the dose, but take the larger dose in the morning.  Today is my first day trying this.

         Even though, Lexapro is known to have a 27-32 hour half life, I am led to believe that it is clearing from my body much quicker. Or perhaps after 16 hours or so, the remaining concentrations of the drug are enough to cause withdrawal symptoms.

 

I'm just not sure how I can avoid withdrawal symptoms once I have to go past 1 ml per day...

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Altostrata

It's possible it's clearing faster at lower dosages.

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Lilu

My doctors suggestion to take a higher dose in the morning and a smaller one at night, seems to have subsided most of the withdrawal symptoms.  I have noticed that I get very sleepy around 6:30 or 7:30 pm, which I know is one of the withdrawal symptoms.  So, I'm going to start timing the doses closer together, like 8 am and 6 pm.  This also seems to offset the insomnia, and helps me wake up around 7 am instead of in the middle of the night.  

 

Also, instead of doing a 10% drop every week, I tried dropping by 5% on Monday and then by another 5% on Thursday.  This seemed to have worked without any major side effects, so far.  I am currently at 1.32 ml of Lexapro liquid.  Hopefully someone out there also find these techniques helpful.

 

Oh, the other thing I want to point out, is that I suspect that my sudden withdrawal onset also had to do with the fact that after using a 1 ml syringe (for split doses, like .9 and .9) I switched to using a 5 ml syringe to do 1 ml in AM and the rest in PM.  I think the 5 ml syringe was delivering a lot less medication because the liquid left in the tip doesn't come out.  Whereas the 1 ml syringe includes the liquid in the tip, which actually makes it more than 1 ml.  At least that's how the crappy 1 ml syringes I get from Target pharmacy seem to work. They're so bad, they don't even stay inside the cap. I have to apply constant pressure to keep the liquid in the bottle from spilling out!  Ughh  - that happened plenty of times in the beginning!

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Altostrata

You may wish to get better syringes. See http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/235-using-an-oral-syringe-and-other-tapering-techniques/

 

Why did you decide to taper by 10% per week?

 

Sounds like splitting the doses was a good idea. This probably compensates for faster metabolism of the lower dosages. Thanks for contributing it.

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Lilu

Why did you decide to taper by 10% per week?

I decided to taper by 10% per week because that is what Dr. Breggin recommends - as per his book, he recommends tapering by 10% every 7 to 10 days.

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Altostrata

If you get withdrawal symptoms, that means Dr. Breggin's plan is too fast for you, and you need to slow down.

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Lilu

 

Very hard to find Baxa (now Baxter), but these look like them: http://www.amazon.com/Sklar-Luer-Slip-tip-Syringe-10-pack/dp/B00EFYQ830/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1383097047&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=sklar+syringe

 

I also found Becton Dickinson syringes for $.16 cents each http://www.vitalitymedical.com/bd-tuberculin-syringe-only.html  - do you know anything about this brand?

 

Also, in reading reviews on Amazon, someone suggested a brilliant idea - put a coat of clear nail polish over the numbers!

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Altostrata

Lilu, these look exactly like Baxa syringes http://www.amazon.com/Sklar-Luer-Slip-tip-Syringe-10-pack/dp/B00EFYQ830/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1383097047&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=sklar+syringe

 

Baxa was purchased by Baxter, which still calls the Baxa-type syringes Exactamed syringes. http://www.baxterbiopharmasolutions.com/oral-dosing-devices-accessories/oral-dosing-devices.html

 

You may be able to get oral syringes locally from a compounding pharmacy, veterinarian, or medical supply store. Ask for a syringe WITHOUT the needle. Tuberculin or insulin syringe with a non-luer tip (aka luer-slip or plain tip) come in the 1mL size.

 

I've bought these in packs of 10 from a medical supply store. They were very inexpensive. Phone the medical supply store first to see what they have.

 

In the US, in  most places you are not required to have a prescription to purchase a syringe.

 

The Becton Dickinson syringes are okay but not as precise as the Exactamed syringes.

 

Here is a source in the UK http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BD-Syringe-Dispenser-For-Oral-Drug-Use-With-Tap-Cap-Like-Baxa-1ml-3ml-5ml-10ml-/151114428586

 

It's not clear whether these are Baxa or Becton Dickinson. The photo looks like Becton Dickinson.

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survivingdaily

I just wanted to add my experience of tapering off of lexapro, in case there's someone like me out there who's having similar symptoms.

 

I took 20 mg of Lexapro daily for about 8 months. It seemed to ease my depression and anxiety, but I was having extremely vivid, intense dreams, was sleeping up to 10 or 11 hours a night, and started gaining weight. I tapered fairly slowly, over approximately 4 months. (At first I tried to go faster, but I felt so lightheaded and dizzy that I slowed down.) My vivid dreams stopped when I got dosage down to 10 mg daily. My need for extra sleep has also decreased, although it's not back yet to my pre-lexapro set-point.

 

 

I took my last dose 12 days ago (on Feb. 26), and about 3 days later I started feeling increasingly moody, irritable, and easily upset. For example, a coworker that I typically find mildly annoying caused me so much distress that I felt enraged and was barely able to stop myself from yelling at her during a staff meeting. I felt unable to tolerate social situations, even simple things like watching tv with friends--the smallest things made me frustrated and upset. It felt like my emotions were shooting all over the place. To make it worse, although I was feeling rage and irritability, I wasn't feeling any joy or excitement. It wasn't that my feelings were dulled, more like my emotion-meter was set on negative.

 

I was really worried that my depression was back. There's not a lot of guidance online for figuring out the difference between withdrawal symptoms and the return of depression, except for one good piece of advice I found: Ask yourself if whatever symptoms you're having are things you struggled with before going on your antidepressant. I was depressed and anxious before starting lexapro, but I never had anger issues. Also, I wasn't feeling that sense of being so overwhelmed by everything that I couldn't even make myself get out of bed...so I decided to stick it out and see if the symptoms eased.

 

The anger and moodiness seemed to start to ease yesterday, 11 days after my last dose. Today I feel nearly normal--although I've also been careful to avoid triggers. I'm hoping I'm almost at the end of it. 

 

I've learned from reading this site and others that my tapering method was probably causing a higher level of withdrawal--after about 2 months of slowly decreasing my daily dose, I moved to every other day for 2 weeks, then every third day for 2 weeks, then every fourth day for 2 weeks and then every fifth. If I could do it again, I'd stick with daily doses but decrease the size of the dose regularly. 

 

And, of course, if I could do it again, I'd pick an antidepressant that doesn't cause such intense withdrawal when it's time to taper off.

 

 

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Altostrata

Thank you, survivingdaily.

 

Please start a topic for yourself in the Introductions forum and keep us posted there about how you're doing.

 

By the way -- all psychiatric drugs and all antidepressants can have withdrawal difficulties. There is no free lunch. Now that you're off Lexapro, you may wish to look into non-drug techniques to manage your symptoms http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/1112-non-drug-techniques-to-cope-with-emotional-symptoms/

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bubble

I just wanted to add my experience of tapering off of lexapro, in case there's someone like me out there who's having similar symptoms.

 

I took 20 mg of Lexapro daily for about 8 months. It seemed to ease my depression and anxiety, but I was having extremely vivid, intense dreams, was sleeping up to 10 or 11 hours a night, and started gaining weight. I tapered fairly slowly, over approximately 4 months. (At first I tried to go faster, but I felt so lightheaded and dizzy that I slowed down.) My vivid dreams stopped when I got dosage down to 10 mg daily. My need for extra sleep has also decreased, although it's not back yet to my pre-lexapro set-point.

 

 

I took my last dose 12 days ago (on Feb. 26), and about 3 days later I started feeling increasingly moody, irritable, and easily upset. For example, a coworker that I typically find mildly annoying caused me so much distress that I felt enraged and was barely able to stop myself from yelling at her during a staff meeting. I felt unable to tolerate social situations, even simple things like watching tv with friends--the smallest things made me frustrated and upset. It felt like my emotions were shooting all over the place. To make it worse, although I was feeling rage and irritability, I wasn't feeling any joy or excitement. It wasn't that my feelings were dulled, more like my emotion-meter was set on negative.

 

I was really worried that my depression was back. There's not a lot of guidance online for figuring out the difference between withdrawal symptoms and the return of depression, except for one good piece of advice I found: Ask yourself if whatever symptoms you're having are things you struggled with before going on your antidepressant. I was depressed and anxious before starting lexapro, but I never had anger issues. Also, I wasn't feeling that sense of being so overwhelmed by everything that I couldn't even make myself get out of bed...so I decided to stick it out and see if the symptoms eased.

 

The anger and moodiness seemed to start to ease yesterday, 11 days after my last dose. Today I feel nearly normal--although I've also been careful to avoid triggers. I'm hoping I'm almost at the end of it. 

 

I've learned from reading this site and others that my tapering method was probably causing a higher level of withdrawal--after about 2 months of slowly decreasing my daily dose, I moved to every other day for 2 weeks, then every third day for 2 weeks, then every fourth day for 2 weeks and then every fifth. If I could do it again, I'd stick with daily doses but decrease the size of the dose regularly. 

 

And, of course, if I could do it again, I'd pick an antidepressant that doesn't cause such intense withdrawal when it's time to taper off.

 

 

I'm also here because of Lexapro but came only 40 days after I quit 2.5 mg. By then I was in such a state that I could barely write.

 

Maybe you will be lucky and be 'at the end of it' after 10 days but in case it doesn't happen like it didn't for many of us, I'm glad you are here so that you can get more support. My first symptoms were exactly as you describe: extreme irritability... but unfortunately it got a lot worse...

 

take care!

 

bubble

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areyouthere

I just want to point out here that I found it difficult to make my own solution of lexapro in just water. Even though I ground it to a fine powder using a mortar and pestle, It tending to stick to the sides of the glass of all utensils ( graduated cylinder, eye dropper, pipette etc) making it impossible for me to feel confident in even dosing.

 

I suspect that it is the filling agent used for the particular tablets I use ( Cipralex made by Lundbeck in Turkey… it is brand NOT generic. The tablets are 20 mg. and oblong in shape) but can't be positive.

 

This is very different than my experience with making a solution using the same technique with generic xanax ( alprazolam) .

 

I only mention this in case someone else experiences frustration with trying to make a uniform solution of this drug for tapering.

 

I have decided to go with a combination of 10 mg tablets and a professionally made , brand solution.

 

Because of cost I purchase Lexapro from Sky Drugs & it is a high quality product…at least it works.

 

RU

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