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UnfoldingSky

Vegetarian Diet Linked To Mental Health Risk

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UnfoldingSky   
UnfoldingSky

Reason I am posting this is it demonstrates that there are likely links between not consuming enough of certain vitamins and minerals and mental health issues.  A huge part of my "depression" was caused by low iron.  Other possible vitamin deficiencies that can result from a vegetarian diet and can cause psych problems are low vit. B12 and low vit. D.

 

http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Health-News/vegetarian-cancer-mental-health/2014/04/02/id/563316/

 

Vegetarian Diet Linked to Cancer, Mental Health Risk

 

Wednesday, 02 Apr 2014 03:31 PM

 

 
 

 

People who follow vegetarian diets are more likely to have generally poorer health, a poorer quality of life, and a higher need for healthcare than their meat-eating counterparts, according to a new Austrian study.
 
CBS News reports that medical researchers from the Medical University of Graz found that while vegetarians tend to be more physically active, drink less alcohol, and smoke less tobacco than those who consume meat they also tend to have higher risks for cancer, heart problems, allergies, and mental health disorders.

Read more at above link...

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

The lack of B12 in a veg diet is a serious deficiency. B12 is found only in animal products or in supplements.

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UnfoldingSky   
UnfoldingSky

As I understand it it's also hard to get a lot of iron through a veggie diet.  I know some plants have it apparently (and so do some water sources) but apparently some iron-rich plants also aren't that easy to digest.

 

Obviously vit. D is a different story since it's in sunlight but in cold climates historically people would get at least some of their winter D supply from certain meats.  Or that is what I have read.  Obviously then if you don't go outside a lot and are on a veg diet your D is going to be affected.

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UnfoldingSky   
UnfoldingSky

I have to wonder about one thing though, what about the impact of drugs in meat?  I would think that wouldn't be negligible and might impact mental health too. 

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Meimeiquest   
Meimeiquest

In the US there is a minority with interest in grass-fed, pastured meat and dairy to avoid the chemicals. If someone is interested in scientific veganism, Joel Fuhrman has a new book, The End of Dieting. It has info on supplements that vegans need in the back. I have no desire to be vegan, but I feel better on his diet, but have never done it for long.

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UnfoldingSky   
UnfoldingSky

I wish I could afford to get all grass fed meat but it's so expensive (and scarce) where I live. 

 

Meimei, do you find you can tolerate the vegan diet while in withdrawal?  Since reacting to drugs I've noticed if I don't eat meat I feel utterly terrible--and that was even after I corrected the iron deficiency that I found out I had.  Not eating meat seems to make me very ungrounded and also seems to ratchet up anxiety.  Maybe that is not enough B12, though I can't fathom how missing meat for a meal should make me feel that sick.

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Meimeiquest   
Meimeiquest

I wish I could afford to get all grass fed meat but it's so expensive (and scarce) where I live. 

 

Meimei, do you find you can tolerate the vegan diet while in withdrawal?  Since reacting to drugs I've noticed if I don't eat meat I feel utterly terrible--and that was even after I corrected the iron deficiency that I found out I had.  Not eating meat seems to make me very ungrounded and also seems to ratchet up anxiety.  Maybe that is not enough B12, though I can't fathom how missing meat for a meal should make me feel that sick.

I haven't done enough in WD to really say. I think I'm gearing up because I am so discouraged about constant fatigue. But when I do it, I eat a lot of beans, and I've always eaten some meat with it. And I'm still having my liver "fetish." He's become a little more permissive about meat with each book. The big thing for me is veggies, veggies, veggies.

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Marie   
Marie

There's a big difference between a "strict vegetarian" or vegan as it is formally known and a vegetarian who eats dairy products and eggs which is a lacto-ova vegetarian.

 

Ive been a lacto-ova vegetarian for years, and I do prefer it. There are many cultures who do not have a primarily meat based diet and do just fine. The production of meat is resource intensive in that it requires huge amounts of land and water for production of foodstuffs for animals to be consumed, while that same amount of land can feed eight times the amount of people.

 

Because of this concern and overpopulation, it has been postulated numerous times that meat will become a small part of the worlds diet instead of a mainstay like it is in many countries. Additionally, many people who do eat meat or don't, have a hereditary tendency to have adequate levels of iron and don't require meat or supplementation to maintain it. I am one of those people, and so are my two daughters, both adults.

 

And speaking individually, if I haven't yet, I just don't care for the taste of meat. It does take some knowledge and/or the desire to learn how to cook legumes and grains in balance to get complete proteins. But eating eggs here and there along with using dairy products is a great way to supplement this type of cooking. Many Indian, Native American, Latino, and Italian dishes are based around this type of diet.

 

I don't proselytize about how I eat. People should do what's comfortable for them. I do use good healthcare practices, and the authors of the study acknowledged that these results went completely against the "grain" of the results of not just many other studies, but the actual health measurements of real people.

 

Well, it's one study in one country, and as with any study, has to have good control over variables. The article did not address this aspect at all. More info will most likely become available.

 

Marie

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

People in general should eat more veggies. But even a semi-vegetarian diet may not provide enough vitamin B12. Some people need more than others.

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Marie   
Marie

I agree, Alto. After a previous discussion a few months back, I decided to start taking a B12 supplement.

 

The smallest pill I could find was 500 mgs of B12. That's actually over 8,000 times the daily requirement of this vitamin, although I suppose not all of it may be absorbed for various reasons.

 

But I decided to use a pill cutter and take a portion of the pill every day instead of the whole thing.

 

This study is all over the Internet, but it's mainly being quoted by "conservative" papers rather than mainstream media. And of course, the vegan side is countering it. Apparently, the same study was conducted previously with totally opposite results. And participants in this study totaled 1,320 while the first study had 15,474 subjects.

 

I read this on a site called "The Vegan r. d."

 

Just sounds to me like the study did not control well for variables. And that could be with both studies.

 

Marie

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Altostrata   
Altostrata

There is no doubt that humans need B12, a legacy of our omnivore origins, and that B12 is found in animal products. Can't get around it, we were designed to be meat-eaters to some extent.

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Marie   
Marie

This study also stated that they did not investigate whether or not people were eating vegetarian out of some concern for their health that was precipitated by the recommendation of their doctor or some other medical professional. Thats a huge, glaring gap in my opinion.

 

It also did not investigate whether or not people eating vegetarian actually knew how to prepare healthy and balanced meals either. In fact, the whole "study" just knd of lumped people into various categories of vegetarianism that are not even totally vegetarian. Eating fish and chicken with lots of veggies is not vegetarian, but people were categorized into these various groups that seem to vary depending on which Internet article is read.

 

And once again, a vegan is the strictest of vegetarians, and eating nothing but vegetables doesn't appeal to me either. I do prefer eating yogurt, cheese, and eggs as they fit into the many vegetarians recipes I make if they actually do fit in.

 

I have seen many teens and young adults in particular who subscribe to the vegetarian lifestyle, and yet it's clear that they may not really understand any of the balancing necessities in doing so. A boiled egg or a carton of yogurt with a raw salad will hardly suffice for a days worth of food, and continued eating in this fashion may well induce states of being unhealthy and anxiety and depression.

 

The study also stated that vegetarians worry more over their health, see the doctor more, and practice less preventative healthcare which actually seems obviously like contradictory statements to me. But nevertheless, when I started to learn lacto ova vegetarianism, I was very worried about my health.

 

I could not breathe hardly at all, and was eventually Dxed with sub glottic stenosis, a somewhat rare disorder that closed off my airway to the size of a pencil eraser. Over 8 years of this, and 14 surgeries later, one of which removed 2 inches of my trachea, I still worry about that aspect of my health. And it was a true trauma, and I still occasionally "test" for stridor with my breathing, and probably always will. I frankly just feel better knowing that my BMI is on the lower range as that also means my body has less weight to carry around which helps my breathing. And yes, all this has caused me a certain amount of anxiety and still does, although it does not rule my life.

 

Lastly but not leastly, I do not like the way meat is produced here or anywhere. I am an animal rights person, but I've reconciled to doing what I do for myself, and sending a variety of organizations some compensation every month. In my opinion, it would be hard for any individual to watch on video the various ways meat is produced for consumption here and anywhere in the world. Or to view the various impacts on our lives that all aspects of current trends toward environmentmentalism are taking given the often preferred stance of hiding our heads in the sands.

 

These concepts alone can produce both depression and anxiety. It's probably best to try to balance all this with recognizing how much can be done individually with the enormity of situations. I don't think that study considered any of this. And with that, I'll say I've taken this a bit off track, and I've definitely showed my politics. But it's all tied in with that rather "unscientific" study which is of course, my opinion.

 

Marie

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wulfgar   
wulfgar

Vitamin A is also problematic for vegetarians and even more for vegans. Beta carotene is not effectively converted to active form in humans. Up to 50 percent of us has genetics that reduces this conversion even further to almost nothing.

 

Eating more vegetables for most of us is probably very heathy. Encouraging our kids to become vegans as is done in school in my country is absolutely horrible!

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dolphins1   
dolphins1

Always check your sources of information and who is behind it. Just because it's a "study" holds no validity for me. The proof is talking to a meeting people who are living a vegetarian vegan lifestyle. Research and make up your own mind. 

 

Remember we were duped into believing that medications would cure a chemical imbalance because "clinical study's" proved their efficacy. 

 

 

 

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Stormstrong   
Stormstrong
On 4/2/2014 at 11:40 PM, UnfoldingSky said:

Reason I am posting this is it demonstrates that there are likely links between not consuming enough of certain vitamins and minerals and mental health issues.  A huge part of my "depression" was caused by low iron.  Other possible vitamin deficiencies that can result from a vegetarian diet and can cause psych problems are low vit. B12 and low vit. D.

 

http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Health-News/vegetarian-cancer-mental-health/2014/04/02/id/563316/

 

Vegetarian Diet Linked to Cancer, Mental Health Risk

 

Wednesday, 02 Apr 2014 03:31 PM

 

 
 

 

People who follow vegetarian diets are more likely to have generally poorer health, a poorer quality of life, and a higher need for healthcare than their meat-eating counterparts, according to a new Austrian study.
 
CBS News reports that medical researchers from the Medical University of Graz found that while vegetarians tend to be more physically active, drink less alcohol, and smoke less tobacco than those who consume meat they also tend to have higher risks for cancer, heart problems, allergies, and mental health disorders.

Read more at above link...

 

I don't trust this "news" at all.

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peng   
peng

These horrifying and extremely sad cases involving toddlers occurred in a neighbouring county and only a relatively short distance apart.

One person culpable was reported as having depression.  Others had dysfunctional lifestyles.

Wonder how much of a part psychotropic drugs played in the whole set of tragedies?

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40801107

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peng   
peng

Clearly, I have put these posts in the wrong place.

They should be in the "In the media" folder.

Maybe mods can relocate, please?

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