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Grace E Jackson

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btdt

What google has to say about her.

 

"Grace E. Jackson MD

Critics

Dr. Jackson, a Board certified psychiatrist, is a 1996 graduate of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. She holds degrees in biology and political science, as well as a Master's degree in Public Administration. Dr. Jackson completed her psychiatric internship and residency in the U.S. Navy, with subsequent assignment to Bethesda Naval Hospital as a staff physician. Since transitioning out of the military in spring 2002, Dr. Jackson has lectured widely in Europe and the United States, speaking about "The Unintended Consequences of Developing Biotechnologies"; "The History and Philosophy of Attention Deficit Disorder"; "Drug-Induced Psychiatric Emergencies"; and "The Limitations of Biological Psychiatry". She has spoken at international conferences featuring highly respected clinicians, such as Dr. David Healy (The Antidepressant Era and The Creation of Psychopharmacology) ; Dr. David Stein (Rital in Is Not The Answer) ; and Dr. Bertram Karon (Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia: The Treatment of Choice) . Dr. Jackson is currently working as a Locum Tenens psychiatrist, based in North Carolina.

[2010 Aug] “Drug-Induced Dementia: A Perfect Crime” By Lynne McTaggart

[pdf 2004 Lecture] ‘What Doctors May Not Tell You About Psychiatric Drugs’ by Grace E. Jackson, MD

Books
[2009] Drug-Induced Dementia: a perfect crime by MD Grace E. Jackson 
1) the causal connection between antipsychotic drugs and Alzheimer's disease 
2) the evidentiary link between stimulants (ADHD drugs) and shrinkage of the brain 
3) the limitations of the neurogenesis theory of antidepressant action (in fact, Dr. Jackson discusses the research evidence which shows that antidepressants damage the hippocampus - the learning and memory center of the brain) 
4) the evidence for mood stabilizers as neurodegenerative, rather than neuroprotective agents 
5) the reasons why existing drug treatments are particularly hazardous for survivors of traumatic brain injury (i.e., soldiers with head injuries)

Rethinking Psychiatric Drugs: A Guide for Informed Consent by Grace E. Jackson, MD"

 

I would like to know where she is now and what she is doing... can't seem to find it???? anyone want to help  me... 

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UnfoldingSky

Last link didn't work for me.

 

I tried to track her down a while ago and had no success.  If I recall I found a number for her and could not connect to her.   She does sound very competent.

 

I think I am going to have to prioritize getting her book after reading this bit:

 

3) the limitations of the neurogenesis theory of antidepressant action (in fact, Dr. Jackson discusses the research evidence which shows that antidepressants damage the hippocampus - the learning and memory center of the brain)

 

I don't know if I have the patience to try this yet again with my doctor but I am tempted to go back to see him one more time to show him that the ongoing memory issues I have which he won't thoroughly acknowledge as being drug-induced are from drugs.  It is so, so, so frustrating to be told when you have severe amnesia that this is all "depression".  I have improved greatly but still this hinders everything I do and I didn't have this before I reacted to an SSRI and then was put on umpteen other drugs that have listed effects of memory loss or even amnesia.  In fact my memory was perfectly fine before I took the SSRI. 

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Barbarannamated

I also tried to track her down at one time, unsuccessfully.

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btdt

Last link didn't work for me.

 

I tried to track her down a while ago and had no success.  If I recall I found a number for her and could not connect to her.   She does sound very competent.

 

I think I am going to have to prioritize getting her book after reading this bit:

 

3) the limitations of the neurogenesis theory of antidepressant action (in fact, Dr. Jackson discusses the research evidence which shows that antidepressants damage the hippocampus - the learning and memory center of the brain)

 

I don't know if I have the patience to try this yet again with my doctor but I am tempted to go back to see him one more time to show him that the ongoing memory issues I have which he won't thoroughly acknowledge as being drug-induced are from drugs.  It is so, so, so frustrating to be told when you have severe amnesia that this is all "depression".  I have improved greatly but still this hinders everything I do and I didn't have this before I reacted to an SSRI and then was put on umpteen other drugs that have listed effects of memory loss or even amnesia.  In fact my memory was perfectly fine before I took the SSRI. 

That is very odd as I got that link just today and now it does not work for me either... I went looking in my history and oddly found this link which I did not read before. 

 

About ssri drugs

 

"Answers to Question 9

 

Grace E. Jackson, M.D.

Because of the fact that the continued use of all SSRIs leads to adaptations within the brain, the discontinuation of these drugs also results in compensatory brain changes.  Some writers distinguish between “drug rebound” – referring to the return or worsening of initial symptoms; and “drug withdrawal”—referring to the emergence of brand new signs or symptoms. For example, when patients stop taking SSRIs, common symptoms include headache, insomnia, nervousness, dizziness, diarrhea, numbness, and dysphoria (low mood).

In my own clinical work and research experience, I believe that it may be useful to conceptualize “drug discontinuation phenomena” in terms of three phases.  First, there is an acute period involving the elimination of the drug from the bloodstream and brain. Most doctors fail to appreciate something which is known as the “brain:plasma” dissociation for pharmacokinetics. What this means is that many psychiatric drugs depart the brain more slowly than they clear the bloodstream. This fact leads many physicians to under-estimate the duration of acute drug withdrawal or drug rebound.

Next, there is a period of recalibration within the brain. During this time, the central nervous system undergoes changes in receptor sensitivity, receptor availability, and intracellular signaling cascades. This process may also last for many weeks.

Finally, there is a chronic period of neuro-rehabilitation. If successful, this final interval (hopefully) involves changes in cell-cell connections, protein synthesis, membrane composition, myelination, and mitochondrial function. These changes can only occur in the sustained absence of the previous neurotoxicant(s).

Textbooks of pharmacology, residency programs, and CME materials do not train physicians to appreciate the fact that these three phases may persist for months. The result is that patients who experience discontinuation symptoms are often misdiagnosed with relapsing or recurring “illnesses” for which lifelong drug therapy is prematurely and wrongly recommended.

Non-prescribers can advocate for their clients by educating them about the complex and highly variable nature of these changes; and by assisting other professionals in properly identifying withdrawal or rebound symptoms when they occur. In some cases, it may be necessary to briefly resume trials of pharmacotherapy before pursuing a gradual and carefully monitored drug taper."

http://criticalthinkrx.org/askpeers.asp

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btdt

The above site had answers to different questions answered by people other than Grace E Jackson but I only presented her answer to the one question I did not even read the question as it was the answer that interested me not the question I only have so much room in my head these days... 

The site came with this disclaimer I hope the link works when you get to it but if not the important bit about ssri is above.. there was more about ssri in pregnancy and other drugs were discussed.  

here is the disclaimer

"Disclaimer

These questions aim to help practitioners reflect on different views and approaches to situations they may encounter in their practice. As stated in this site’s Terms of Use, in no way is the information to be construed as diagnostic or treatment recommendations. The opinions in this section are not, and are not intended to be, a substitute for direct psychological, behavioral, medical, or other care based on your individual condition and circumstances or those of your child. While this site may contain descriptions of psychological, psychiatric, pharmacological, and other interventions, such descriptions and any related materials should not be used to diagnose or treat a mental health problem without consulting a qualified and competent mental health practitioner. You are advised to consult your own trusted health care provider about your personal questions or concerns."

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Nikki

The memory issue is a problem.....I wonder about drug induced dementia...

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btdt

She did write a book about it .. which i have at the moment but cannot settle my brain enough to read...

 

I think if any doctor is going to step up and do something with the truth they know it will be this lady...

 

so keep an eye on what she does.

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compsports

Last link didn't work for me.

 

I tried to track her down a while ago and had no success.  If I recall I found a number for her and could not connect to her.   She does sound very competent.

 

I think I am going to have to prioritize getting her book after reading this bit:

 

3) the limitations of the neurogenesis theory of antidepressant action (in fact, Dr. Jackson discusses the research evidence which shows that antidepressants damage the hippocampus - the learning and memory center of the brain)

 

I don't know if I have the patience to try this yet again with my doctor but I am tempted to go back to see him one more time to show him that the ongoing memory issues I have which he won't thoroughly acknowledge as being drug-induced are from drugs.  It is so, so, so frustrating to be told when you have severe amnesia that this is all "depression".  I have improved greatly but still this hinders everything I do and I didn't have this before I reacted to an SSRI and then was put on umpteen other drugs that have listed effects of memory loss or even amnesia.  In fact my memory was perfectly fine before I took the SSRI. 

US,

 

I definitely understand your frustrations but don't waste your time with this doctor.  They are just not going to admit anything come heck or high water.

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UnfoldingSky

This link may or may not work in tracking her down... too late to call now. http://health.usnews.com/doctors/grace-jackson-104388

 

900 Royal Bonnet Dr 

Wilmington, NC 28405

 

Contact number:(910) 520-4162

 

I may still try her.  I'll let you guys know if I manage to get in touch with her.

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UnfoldingSky

US,

 

I definitely understand your frustrations but don't waste your time with this doctor.  They are just not going to admit anything come heck or high water.

 Thank you comp, I needed to hear that.  I am not sure why I would even bother as you are right. I'll have a better chance of winning the lottery than getting him to admit the drugs caused my problems.

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btdt

 

US,

 

I definitely understand your frustrations but don't waste your time with this doctor.  They are just not going to admit anything come heck or high water.

 

Thank you comp, I needed to hear that.  I am not sure why I would even bother as you are right. I'll have a better chance of winning the lottery than getting him to admit the drugs caused my problems.

 

I completely agree but if there were some proof maybe he would look ... when I took proof to my doc he said it was not good enough... but there have been a lot of new things since then.

If he does not want to know he will not know.  

I say you can always take him information and have a discussion if you want to ... it is your business but he has some reasons not to hear you as many reasons as you have to have him hear you. 

If I had the stuff from Grace E Jackson i would have taken it to my doctor... I would have kept taking him an article from Alto each wk till I was done seeing him... i did take him a few.  

I think some of them truly don't know.. they just know what they are taught.

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UnfoldingSky

 

I completely agree but if there were some proof maybe he would look ... when I took proof to my doc he said it was not good enough... but there have been a lot of new things since then.

 

If he does not want to know he will not know.  

I say you can always take him information and have a discussion if you want to ... it is your business but he has some reasons not to hear you as many reasons as you have to have him hear you. 

If I had the stuff from Grace E Jackson i would have taken it to my doctor... I would have kept taking him an article from Alto each wk till I was done seeing him... i did take him a few.  

I think some of them truly don't know.. they just know what they are taught. 

 

 

My doctor isn't likely to listen unfortunately. 

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btdt

This is new to me:

 

Third, the application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy has confirmed the persistence of fluorinated compounds within non brain compartments.  In the same group of subjects mentioned above (four Luvox, two Prozac patients), researchers performed fluorine MRS recordings of the brain and lower extremities during active treatment and medication withdrawal.

 

Following the cessation of drug treatment, and even after plasma levels had reached zero, a fluorine signal was still detected in peripheral tissues for one to ninety-one days. 

 

Researchers concluded that the imaging scans were scans were consistent with drug (or drug metabolite) sequestration within the bone marrow of the legs.  They also observed that these changes appear to be the result of chronic exposure, as the same kinds of effects werre not detected in other subjects who had just initiated drug therapy.  Although no hematologic abnormalities were seen in these patients, the eventual bone marrow drug accumulation (for example, effects upon bone growth or blood cells) remain unknown. 

 

It is stated else where in the book that the drug leaves the blood plasma much faster than it leaves the brain... so just because you blood work looks cool does not mean the drug is not in your brain and in your bones.

source: page 97, Rethinking Psychiatric drugs, Grace E Jackson

... this may not fit here but since it had her name I put it here ...

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btdt

 

 

I completely agree but if there were some proof maybe he would look ... when I took proof to my doc he said it was not good enough... but there have been a lot of new things since then.

 

If he does not want to know he will not know.  

I say you can always take him information and have a discussion if you want to ... it is your business but he has some reasons not to hear you as many reasons as you have to have him hear you. 

If I had the stuff from Grace E Jackson i would have taken it to my doctor... I would have kept taking him an article from Alto each wk till I was done seeing him... i did take him a few.  

I think some of them truly don't know.. they just know what they are taught. 

 

 

My doctor isn't likely to listen unfortunately. 

 

I doubt mine would have either... but I could have shown him the reasons for my symptoms was there in black and white ... and that I did not need more drugs when I was actually trying to rid my body of the effects and accumulation of previous treatment which broke me. 

What has me a bit bewildered is how this book was printed in 2005...

 

2005 two years before I quit effexor 2005 about the time I was in poop out had I found it then I may still have a home now.. a life. This is regret on my part. 

It was printed  in lots of time to save me had i found it then... 

I have read countless books with less valuable information ... 

what gives with this why not a word about this book... 

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btdt

It is now old and I am sure she knows a lot more now than she did then... wonder when her next book is coming out or is she has been shut up.

 

The Dementia book was published in 2009 

 

The books I have from the library which was difficult to get on loan from another library... is full of notes from some other people who had it before me... those notes are very interesting and it looks like a court case is being researched think I will take the notes to look over later.

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UnfoldingSky

 

Although no hematologic abnormalities were seen in these patients, the eventual bone marrow drug accumulation (for example, effects upon bone growth or blood cells) remain unknown. "
 

 

 

I wonder if this explains why some younger people report that they feel the drugs stunted their growth?

 

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UnfoldingSky

2005 two years before I quit effexor 2005 about the time I was in poop out had I found it then I may still have a home now.. a life. This is regret on my part. 

It was printed  in lots of time to save me had i found it then... 

I have read countless books with less valuable information ... 

what gives with this why not a word about this book... 

 

 

That is haunting.

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compsports

It is now old and I am sure she knows a lot more now than she did then... wonder when her next book is coming out or is she has been shut up.

The million dollar question as to whether she has been shut up.   Not that I believe in conspiratcy theories.  LOL!

 

I know other people may feel different but personally, I don't feel these types of books help me although I am glad someone is writing them.   I guess the only exception is if she were to specifically mention how these drugs mess up the sleep cycle which I feel has happened to me and cited research that I could share with my family.

 

CS

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compsports

 

 

US,

 

I definitely understand your frustrations but don't waste your time with this doctor.  They are just not going to admit anything come heck or high water.

 

 

Thank you comp, I needed to hear that.  I am not sure why I would even bother as you are right. I'll have a better chance of winning the lottery than getting him to admit the drugs caused my problems. 

 

Sorry for my late response US as I am glad I could help.

 

I think SA should award a prize to the person who finds a doctor who admits that psych meds cause side effects.  It could take awhile though for that person to win.

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UnfoldingSky

Sorry for my late response US as I am glad I could help.

 

I think SA should award a prize to the person who finds a doctor who admits that psych meds cause side effects.  It could take awhile though for that person to win.

 

 

Ha!  You know, I bet we could get quite a lot of money raised before that happened....

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btdt

 

Although no hematologic abnormalities were seen in these patients, the eventual bone marrow drug accumulation (for example, effects upon bone growth or blood cells) remain unknown. "
 

 

 

I wonder if this explains why some younger people report that they feel the drugs stunted their growth?

 

 

No I think that may be the growth factor she writes of.. I know I read something about it I only had the books a short time from on loan from another library and with the grief and being ill I did not get to reading them... all the way just a page here and there... 

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btdt

 

It is now old and I am sure she knows a lot more now than she did then... wonder when her next book is coming out or is she has been shut up.

The million dollar question as to whether she has been shut up.   Not that I believe in conspiratcy theories.  LOL!

 

I know other people may feel different but personally, I don't feel these types of books help me although I am glad someone is writing them.   I guess the only exception is if she were to specifically mention how these drugs mess up the sleep cycle which I feel has happened to me and cited research that I could share with my family.

 

CS

 

I am not sure she mentioned insomnia specifically but she may have if I get a chance before the books go back I will try to keep in mind to look for insomnia... I think it was mentioned in with the growth hormone cortistol and other changes antidepressants cause in the brain/body functioning. 

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compsports

 

 

It is now old and I am sure she knows a lot more now than she did then... wonder when her next book is coming out or is she has been shut up.

The million dollar question as to whether she has been shut up.   Not that I believe in conspiratcy theories.  LOL!

 

I know other people may feel different but personally, I don't feel these types of books help me although I am glad someone is writing them.   I guess the only exception is if she were to specifically mention how these drugs mess up the sleep cycle which I feel has happened to me and cited research that I could share with my family.

 

CS

 

I am not sure she mentioned insomnia specifically but she may have if I get a chance before the books go back I will try to keep in mind to look for insomnia... I think it was mentioned in with the growth hormone cortistol and other changes antidepressants cause in the brain/body functioning. 

 

Thanks!

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btdt

I think I like books as books have always been my way out of problems I seek answers and I hope to find some clues in books.. actually they have helped me some in validating my experiences and bringing to mind some things I did not think of which truly helped me get a handle on what was going on with me. 

I started out thinking I was just an insane person and had gone insane in relation to my own inborn insanity with no connection to drugs and every year I did not kill myself and did not have hallucination was a good year and I had drugs to thank for that ... so putting up with the side effects of start up and drug switches was the price I just had to pay for the live I had been allow to extend thanks to drugs.. because I had come down with a mental illness like other people get the flu... or so I thought for years and years and years... 18 years actually... 

 

That is what I thought when I began learning about withdrawal from the internet.. that is what I thought when I first started getting books at the library... 

 

if it were not for the internet and the library 

 

I would still believe I went insane ... like others caught the flu and it was never going away... I was so scared to stop antidepressants I did not listen to the neurologist even tho my head was dropping to my chest and my foot was dragging and many other things... I did not want to stop effexor... I was basically terrified.. of the crazies coming back.  I bought in and believed I was one bottle of pills away from insanity. So scared I would risk my physical health to save me mental health.. 

 

If I were not getting worse I could not have done it. 

 

I was likely a year after I went cold turkey that I read my first book.. around the same time I figure out the drug I had been on for leg pain was indeed prozac not a inflammatory type med I had been lead to believe it was . ...only because get this .

..18 years later I still had the bottle of prozac and got the bottle to look up the name.. as I seen the other name for prozac on a withdrawal site and knew the name...

 

I then learned prozac under any name can cause a severe adverse reaction.. and yes it can cause suicide and hallucinations... all those symptoms that convinced me I was insane 18 years before were drug induced... I took prozac less than a month I still had the remaining pills in the original bottle when I looked it up in 2008... I had been started on 60mg. of prozac.

I think that is a lot for pain control.

 

Had I not read the books and withdrawal sites I would likely be redrugged by now - severely disabled by side effects- or dead...  and I would NEVER have been any wiser... 

 

and I wonder how many others just like me are out there right now in one of those other states because they did not have the information... 

 

And I can't stop reading books if there is one out there I want it want to know... 

 

Just my story about books.. and another note...

 

if you never read a withdrawal books you will; never know what is in there that speaks to you about this experience for me it turned on all sorts of lights and solidified my knowing that these drugs for me at least were my problem... 

 

Not some flu type of insanity... not a chemical imbalance.. not before the drugs at least.

 

I am a huge advocate of books as soon as your able I suggest you read some...

 

I have my recommendations in the book section already

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UnfoldingSky

Your story is so horrifying btdt.  I am glad you managed to figure out what was going on.  I wonder how many others there must be who never figure it out. 

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btdt

I am sure there would be a landslide of people if this knowledge became mainstream.  It just might happen one day. 

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btdt

Your story is so horrifying btdt.  I am glad you managed to figure out what was going on.  I wonder how many others there must be who never figure it out. 

I would rather not focus on my story in the thread but on Grace Jackson and her amazing books... :)

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UnfoldingSky

 

Your story is so horrifying btdt.  I am glad you managed to figure out what was going on.  I wonder how many others there must be who never figure it out. 

I would rather not focus on my story in the thread but on Grace Jackson and her amazing books... :)

 

 

Sorry, I have a tendency to wander off topic.  And I couldn't find your thread when I wrote this.  :)

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btdt

That is ok I was looking for an excuse to bump this thread truth be told I wish some people would read these books... lead a horse to water and all...but truth be told they are hard to read ... I should read them myself but I am not feeling smart enough... I want some smart person to read them and then spoon feed me... I wish I had stayed in school ...

and studied chemistry biology but I didn't...

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btdt

http://www.whale.to/drugs/Jackson.pdf

 

I am cherry picking bits you have to read it yourself at the link just like I am doing .. just a bit to wet you appetite. 

 

What Doctors May Not Tell You About Psychiatric Drugs

 

e, UCE Birmingham Public Lecture, UCE Birmingham , UCE Birmingham June 2004

 

"With regards to the antidepressant medications: many people may not also realise that many individuals who receive serotonergic antidepressants, such as Prozac (Fluoxetine), Seroxat (Paroxetine) Zoloft or Lustral (sertraline) and many more; all of these are in the family of serotonergic anti-depressants. Many patients who take these drugs also develop Parkinsonian side effects. What many people might not have been told by their doctors about antidepressants is that just as there is a Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome with antipsychotic medicines, there’s a baby version of this: patients who take Prozac or Zoloft might experience something called Serotonin Syndrome. It’s almost like Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome but it’s not quite as severe, and does not appear to cause death."

 

 

The Brain

The brain is very complex, often it seems to me that people may not realise what’s in the brain, or doctors may sometimes not say to a patient what they need to. One of the things that doctors probably seldom tell their patients (if they refresh their own memories) is what is in the brain and what is the target of these medications. The brain consists of over 100 billion neurons. Each one of these cells makes a thousand to ten thousand connections with other cells. When we think about what’s actually going on inside the human brain, things are quickly getting out of hand - very complex. There are also other kinds of cells that are called glia, or support cells, and there are five to ten times as many glia as there are neurons. The only thing that the drug companies talk about is the neuron, but it is important to realize that medications also affect the glial cells. This is another thing that people don’t hear about. The most important thing of all is realise that there is a very special barrier called the Blood Brain Barrier. It prevents most things that we eat, or most toxins that we are exposed to, from actually passing through the blood into the brain tissue. When a medication is made, scientists manipulate that molecule so that it can get through this barrier. This is a very interesting thing to think about - what it means to actually be introducing something into the body, which goes around the natural barrier or avoids the natural defences of the brain.

 

"Another thing I’d like to mention is this (APPENDIX B) partial listing of some of the chemicals that the brain uses to deliver messages. This is a list of about 60 different chemicals, but for all we know there may be hundreds more that have not yet been identified. Now, medications that are used most often in psychiatry only address or target five of these chemicals. So the next time the patient says ‘doctor what is this drug doing?’ and he or she’s says ‘well this is only working on serotonin’ - well that’s a lot of nonsense because we really don’t have doctors or scientists who are studying the ripple effects (of drugs). When you block dopamine receptors what about leuenkephalin, gastrin, and CCK (cholecystokinin)? What you need to realise is that when neuroscientists devote their lifetime to the study of these chemicals they literally study just one of these chemicals. One chemical may be their entire life’s work. So these are wonderful people who are doing wonderful research but it’s very difficult to find people who know how to put these things together, which is really what a human being is - a very complex system, where all these chemicals impact each other (at the same time)."

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btdt

sensitivity withdrawal pooped out or tolerance

Well, in the human brain, it seems that “For every action, there is an unequal and sometimes unpredictable reaction.” (APPENDIX D) When you begin decreasing the flow of (neuro) transmission, the number of receptors changes- it goes up. This is a very important thing to understand; it explains why some people get withdrawal or discontinuation syndromes when they stop taking their medication or when their medication is lowered in dose. It also explains why some people may become more sensitive to side effects over time, because now there are more receptors there, waiting for the chemical. This idea of receptor change is something that is very important and something that very few physicians share with their patients. Alternatively, what could happen is that the person who is taking the medication experiences an increase in the flow of messages - the neurotransmitters could actually get revved up. Dopamine or serotonin could really get revved up, and guess what? The body reacts to that. And when the flow of transmissions gets revved up, the number of receptors usually goes down. This may be an explanation for why some people go back to their doctor and say, “I’m not feeling good. I’ve been on this medicine for six weeks, and I felt pretty good for the first six weeks but now, either they gave me a bad dose at the pharmacy, or it was a bad lot, but the medicine is just not cutting it anymore”. So this idea of down-regulation – when receptors disappear or stop responding – this is something that can result in people saying that the medicine has worn off. With an antidepressant, for instance, some people refer to this phenomenon as Prozac “poop-out”. It means, basically, that tolerance develops to the effects of a drug. This is precisely what happens to some people who drink alcohol and they eventually find that they can drink more and more, because their receptors keep going down and down. And then psychiatrists always blame the patient (for Prozac poop-out). I said this the other day at a lecture, and I think one of the psychiatrists in the audience almost had a seizure! I kept saying they always blame the patient and he said, “You mean the underlying disease?” and I said “yes, like I said they always blame the patient!” Many doctors, in my experience, have been extremely reluctant to give credit to their clients or their patients. They seem to feel they are a different species and that it ‘couldn’t happen to me’. We’re all human, we’re all capable of psychosis and depression, we all could go there. So, with receptor change, the evidence is based on animal and human studies.

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btdt

Another aspect of medications which doctors frequently don’t share with patients is the fact that there are many types of receptors. Some physicians may be asked by a patient: “how will this medicine affect my brain?” and they will say something about the dopamine (D2) receptor. At least, I imagine some doctors have said that. What they’re probably not telling you is that there are five types of dopamine receptors. And when it comes to serotonin receptors, there are fifteen different types. For a doctor to very simplistically say the drug will only block the dopamine 2 receptor, he should hopefully be thinking about the other four receptors being blocked, as well. Many doctors have a very simplistic understanding of just what these drugs are doing to other kinds of receptors, even when it’s the same molecule involved. And this will become important as we move to some of the side effects.

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So, what about the newer medicines? Well, the jury is still out about whether these medications will cause Tardive Dyskinesia because these medications haven’t been out long enough to know. It took doctors fourteen years to acknowledge Tardive Dyskinesia after the first generation of neurolpetics was created. So far, it appears to be true that fewer patients develop Parkinsonian side effects, depending on the dose of these new medicines. Interestingly what many doctors don’t tell their patients about Risperdal (risperidone) as that it seems to be the only one of the newer drugs that causes a prolonged elevation of prolactin.

 

osteoperosis breast cancer stopped periods or something are the risks of this... makes me think of this foot that keeps breaking and hormonal issues of the past

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This is what you will find at the end of the article if anyone is up to and wants to do some research here are some places to start ... in the old days when I could not sleep and had a ton of energy and my brain worked real well at some points this would have been Eden for me... not saying it would go anywhere but I would have looked.. so any young energetic folks here you go have a hay day...

 

And when you resume treatment with the medicine in these cases, you eclipse the withdrawal syndromes. The patients almost always seem to get better when the drugs are resumed


What Your Doctor May NOT Tell You About Psychiatric Drugs – Grace E. Jackson, MD References Baker, GB; Greenshaw, AJ. “Effects of Long-Term Administration of Antidepressants and Neuroleptics on Receptors in the Central Nervous System.” Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 1989 (vol 9, no1): 1-44. Bloom, FE; Lazerson, A. Brain, Mind and Behaviour. 2nd Edition. NY: W.H. Freeman and Company, 1996. Carter, Rita. Mapping the Mind. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1998. Cooper, JR: Bloom, FE; Roth, RH. The Biochemical Basis of Neuropharmacology. 8th Edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. Famuyiwa, OO; Eccleston, AA; Donaldson, AA; Garside, RF. “Tardive Dyskinesia and Dementia.” British Journal of Psychiatry. 1979; 135: 500-04. Gershon, S. “Concluding Summary.” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 1994; 89 (suppl 380): 83-5. Goldberg, Elkhonon. “Akinesia, Tardive Dysmentia, and Frontal Lobe Disorder in Schizophrenia.” Schizophrenia Bulletin. 1985; 11; 2: 255-63. Hanaway, J; Woolsay, TA; Gado, MH; Roberts Jr, MP. The Brain Atlas: A Visual Guide to the Human Central Nervous System. Bethesda, MD: Fitzgerald Science Press, Inc., 1998. Hoehn-Saric, R; Harris, GJ; Pearlson, GD; Cox, CS; Machlin, SR; Camargo, EE. “A Fluoxetin-Induced Frontal Lobe Syndrome in an Obsessive Compulsive Patient.” Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 1991; 52 (3): 131-3. Katzung, BG. Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Eighth Edition. New York: Lange Medical Books/McGraw-Hill, 2001. Lader, MH. “Neuroleptic-Induced Deficit Syndrome (NIDS). Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 1993; 54 (12): 493-500. Lewander, T. “Neuroleptics and the neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome.” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 1994; 89(suppl 380): 8-13. Lindstrom, LH. “Long Term clinical and social outcome studies in schizophrenia in relation to the cognitive and emotional side effects of antipsychotic drugs.” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 1994; 89(suppl 380): 74-76. Myslobodsky, Michael S. “Anosognosia in Tardive Dyskinesia: ‘Tardive Dysmentia’ or ‘Tardive Dementia’?” Schizophrenia Bulletin. 1986; 12(1): 1-6. Nestler, EJ: Hyman, SE; Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundation for Clinical Neuroscience. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2001. Schooler, NR. “Deficit Symptoms in schizophrenia: negative symptoms versus neuroleptic-induced deficits.” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 1994. 89(suppl 380): 21-26. Stahl, Stephen M. Essential Psychopharmacology. Second Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Tranter, R; Healy, D. “Neuroleptic Discontinuation Syndromes.” Journal of Psychopharmacology. 1998; 12 (4): 401- 06. Wilson, IC; Garbutt, JC; Lanier, CF; Moylan, J; Nelson, W; Prange Jr, AJ. “Is There a Tardive Dysmentia?” Schizophrenia Bulletin. 1983; 9 (2): 187-92. 


 

APPENDIX B 

AMINES

 AMINO ACIDS Serotonin(5HT) Gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA) Dopamine(DA) Glycine Norepinephrine(NE) Glutamic acid(glutamate) Epinephrine(E) Aspartic acid(aspartate) Acetylcholine(Ach) Gamma-hydroxybutyrate Tyramine Octopamine

 

 GUT HORMONES Phenylethylamine Cholecystokinin(CCK) Tryptamine Gastrin Melatonin Motilin 

Histamine Pancreatic polypeptide Secretin

 

 PITUITARY PEPTIDES Vasoactive intestinal peptide(VIP) Corticotropin(ACTH) Growth hormone(GH)

 

 OPIOID PEPTIDES Lipotropin Dynorphin Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone(alpha-MSH) Beta-endorphin Oxytocin Met-enkephalin Vasoporessin Leu-enkephalin Thyroid-stimulating hormone(TSH) Kyotorphin Prolactin 

 

MISCELLANEOUS PEPTIDES CIRCULATING HORMONES Bombesin Angiotensin Bradykinin Calcitonin Carnosine Glucagon Neuropeptide Y Insulin Neurotensin Leptin Delta sleep factor Atrial natriuretic factor Galanin Estrogens Oxerin Androgens Progestins GASES Thyroid hormones Nitric Oxide(NO) Carbonmonoxide(CO)

 

 HYPOTHALAMIC-RELEASING HOTRMONES Corticotropin-releasing factor(CRH) 

NEUROKININS/TACHYKININS Gonadotropin-releasing hormone(GnRH) Substance P Somatostatin Neurokinin A Thyrotropin-releasing hormone(TRH) Neurokinin 

 

B LIPID NEUROTRANSMITTER Anandamide Neurotransmitters in brain 

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