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Grace E Jackson

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to save you time I searched this I had to...

A Fluoxetin-Induced Frontal Lobe Syndrome in an Obsessive Compulsive Patient.” Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 1991; 52 (3): 131-3. Katzung

 

It goes to a nondiscript non English drug sales page .. typical 

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btdt

I took a look at this too

Uses of calcitonin[edit] Treatments[edit]
220px-Calcitonin_Bones.png
 
Calcitonin effecting the spine.

Calcitonin can be used therapeutically for the treatment of hypercalcemia orosteoporosis.

Oral calcitonin may have a chondroprotective role in osteoarthritis (OA), according to data in rats presented in December, 2005, at the 10th World Congress of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) in Boston, Massachusetts. Although calcitonin is a known antiresorptive agent, its disease-modifying effects on chondrocytes and cartilage metabolisms have not been well established until now.

This new study, however, may help to explain how calcitonin affects osteoarthritis. “Calcitonin acts both directly on osteoclasts, resulting in inhibition of bone resorption and following attenuation of subchondral boneturnover, and directly on chondrocytes, attenuating cartilage degradation and stimulating cartilage formation,” says researcher Morten Karsdal, MSC, PhD, of the department of pharmacology at Nordic Bioscience in Herlev, Denmark. “Therefore, calcitonin may be a future efficacious drug for OA.”[18]

Subcutaneous injections of calcitonin in patients suffering from mania resulted in significant decreases in irritability, euphoria and hyperactivity and hence calcitonin holds promise for treating bipolar disorder.[19] However no further work on this potential application of calcitonin has been reported.

A look for a drug to help bones did not pan out... just found this

http://saveourbones.com/fda-admits-huge-osteoporosis-drug-mistake/

site also says Ads hurt our bones and this is how

http://saveourbones.com/new-study-these-top-selling-drugs-double-fracture-risk/

 

What’s Going On?

How do SSRIs raise fracture risk? As their name implies, SSRIs inhibit the reuptake (reabsorption) of the brain chemical serotonin. According to the study,

“Functional serotonin receptors and the serotonin transporter have been localized to osteoblasts and osteocytes, and serotonin seems to modulate the skeletal effects of parathyroid hormone and mechanical stimulation.”
2

In other words, SSRIs keep you from forming bone by inhibiting serotonin, which plays a role in bone formation.

says depression is bad for your bones too.. raised inflammation

. Researchers explain that depression leads to an overproduction of IL-6, an inflammatory body marker. As Save Our Bones readers know, chronic inflammation has a significant negative impact on your bones.

And now we find out that depressed women who take SSRIs have increased fracture risk. So depression itself harms your bones, and so do the antidepressant drugs.

 

we can't win

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btdt

Critical Think is a question and answer page... because of my great esteem for Dr Grace E Jackson I have chosen to post her answers to the questions asked there that pertain to withdrawal

 

 

After attempting to discontinue use of an SSRI, a client of mine became severely agitated and unable to concentrate. She also experienced severe digestive distress. The prescribing psychiatrist explained to her that she is still suffering from depression and should continue to take the medication. I believe she is experiencing withdrawal symptoms. How can we sort through conflicting information and help her obtain appropriate counsel so she can successfully discontinue treatment?

 

Grace E. Jackson, M.D.

Because of the fact that the continued use of all SSRIs leads to adaptations within the brain, the discontinuation of these drugs also results in compensatory brain changes.  Some writers distinguish between “drug rebound” – referring to the return or worsening of initial symptoms; and “drug withdrawal”—referring to the emergence of brand new signs or symptoms. For example, when patients stop taking SSRIs, common symptoms include headache, insomnia, nervousness, dizziness, diarrhea, numbness, and dysphoria (low mood).

In my own clinical work and research experience, I believe that it may be useful to conceptualize “drug discontinuation phenomena” in terms of three phases.  First, there is an acute period involving the elimination of the drug from the bloodstream and brain. Most doctors fail to appreciate something which is known as the “brain:plasma” dissociation for pharmacokinetics. What this means is that many psychiatric drugs depart the brain more slowly than they clear the bloodstream. This fact leads many physicians to under-estimate the duration of acute drug withdrawal or drug rebound.

Next, there is a period of recalibration within the brain. During this time, the central nervous system undergoes changes in receptor sensitivity, receptor availability, and intracellular signaling cascades. This process may also last for many weeks.

Finally, there is a chronic period of neuro-rehabilitation. If successful, this final interval (hopefully) involves changes in cell-cell connections, protein synthesis, membrane composition, myelination, and mitochondrial function. These changes can only occur in the sustained absence of the previous neurotoxicant(s).

Textbooks of pharmacology, residency programs, and CME materials do not train physicians to appreciate the fact that these three phases may persist for months. The result is that patients who experience discontinuation symptoms are often misdiagnosed with relapsing or recurring “illnesses” for which lifelong drug therapy is prematurely and wrongly recommended.

Non-prescribers can advocate for their clients by educating them about the complex and highly variable nature of these changes; and by assisting other professionals in properly identifying withdrawal or rebound symptoms when they occur. In some cases, it may be necessary to briefly resume trials of pharmacotherapy before pursuing a gradual and carefully monitored drug taper.

 

 

 If successful, this final interval (hopefully) involves

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answer to another question where the answer involves wd

 

I am concerned about a client who has a history of alcohol abuse and appears to have developed a dependence on benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety. She comes from a family with multiple problems including domestic violence, unemployment and substance abuse. How do I raise concerns with the client, and the physician, about the prescription of addictive substances to someone with a history of addiction?

 

 

Grace E. Jackson, M.D.

Almost all of the drugs that are prescribed by psychiatrists either sensitize the brain to other addictions (benzos cross-sensitizing to alcohol, stimulants cross-sensitizing to cocaine) or become addictive substances on their own.

For most patients, the use of psychiatric medications ultimately fulfills four of the seven DSM criteria for drug dependence: 1) tolerance; 2) withdrawal; 3) larger amounts consumed, or longer use than intended; and 4) continued substance use despite knowledge of having a persistent problem which is due to that substance.

First, the use of all psychiatric medications is commonly accompanied by habituation or “tolerance.” As the brain adapts to the presence of drug treatment, the efficacy of the initial dosing dissipates. It is for this reason that almost all patients return to their doctors, only to have their doses increased over time. Second, the interruption or cessation of psychoactive drugs almost always results in withdrawal or rebound symptoms (such as: insomnia, headache, irritability, diarrhea, tingling, tiredness). Third, many patients find that they are unable to tolerate these withdrawal symptoms. This results in chronic or maintenance therapy which lasts much longer than originally intended. Fourth, medicated patients find themselves continuing psychiatric drugs despite the fact that these treatments are the cause of significant suffering and disability (impaired judgment when driving, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, impulsivity).

What about benzodiazepine use by patients who have histories of alcohol abuse?  Textbooks of pharmacology and drug labels specifically warn physicians about the importance of avoiding benzodiazepines in previous alcoholics, for two reasons:
1) to avoid re-kindling the previous compulsion to drink alcohol; 2) to avoid “hooking” the patient on the alcohol-substitute.

Ultimately, a client must be given an accurate or “authentically” informed consent to care. This requires truthful information about the potential for prescription medications (no less than street drugs) to induce long term chemical dependency and degenerative changes in the brain.

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btdt

I have an adult client who is socially withdrawn and sometimes makes bizarre statements. He is currently receiving a high dose of an atypical antipsychotic and appears overly-sedated. How do I discuss a dosage reduction with the client? With the prescribing physician? Are there ways I can deal with his withdrawn and unusual behavior other than with medication?

 

Grace E. Jackson, M.D.

The first priority for any mental health professional should be the identification of biological causes for these phenomena.   Psychiatrists are trained to consider and screen for the following conditions: infection (e.g., pneumonia, urinary tract infection, syphilis, hepatitis, HIV, Lyme), intracranial structural defects (brain tumor, brain abscess, arterial-venous malformation, acute or resolving stroke), endocrinopathies (dysregulated glucose, prolactin, cortisol, thyroid hormone), hypoxia-ischemia (cardiovascular or pulmonary disease), demyelinating disease (multiple sclerosis), autoimmune disease (systemic lupus, arthritides), metabolic abnormalities (e.g., anemia),  dietary abnormalities (e.g., thiamine, pyridoxine, folate, cobalamin, zinc, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, chloride ) and/or exposure to neurotoxicants (i.e., street drugs, prescription drugs, heavy metals, organophosphates, solvents).

 

The so-called “atypical” antipsychotics are neither “atypical” nor “antipsychotic.” 
Not infrequently, these chemicals induce or enhance bizarre statements (disorganized speech or delusions), social withdrawal (depression), and sedation (encephalopathy), regardless of dose. The processes through which these medications exert destabilizing effects include receptor blockade (D2, ACH, histamine), electrophysiological (depolarization) blockade; direct toxicity (cell death); and induction of other disease processes (pneumonia, diabetes, hypothyroidism, PE).

Prescribing clinicians are largely unaware of these problems. Non-prescribers may be able to assist clients by providing pertinent information to prescribers (an extensive set of peer reviewed journal articles can be downloaded for free from the website of The Law Project for Psychiatric Rights), and by advocating for their clients with family members, schools, employers, and the courts.  Dose reductions may or may not improve troublesome symptoms, but they are often a good place to start. Dose reductions should be conducted gradually and with careful monitoring, unless an immediate health emergency (such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome) demands abrupt cessation.

As for dealing with clients who exhibit withdrawn or bizarre thought processes, language, and/or behaviors, the Pre-Therapy Network (see work of Garry Prouty, PsyD) is a group of international therapists and laypersons who have learned to apply client-centered ideas and techniques in such scenarios. The entire goal of Pre-Therapy is to “make contact” with individuals who are unresponsive to usual forms of communication. Also, the mere act of “being with” a person who is experiencing profound emotional distress can provide great solace.

[see Dan Dorman’s book, Dante’s Cure, for a real-life story of a woman who made a complete recovery from psychosis, and how that journey occurred.]

 

all the above from this link

http://criticalthinkrx.org/askpeers.asp

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btdt

http://psychrights.org/Drugs/DrJacksonUCELecture(UK)09.06.04.pdf

 

bit about her tho it is old and does not have all her accomplishments or books

 

Dr. Jackson, a Board certified psychiatrist, is a 1996 graduate of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. She holds degrees in biology and political science, as well as a Master's degree in Public Administration. Dr. Jackson completed her psychiatric internship and residency in the U.S. Navy, with subsequent assignment to Bethesda Naval Hospital as a staff physician. Since transitioning out of the military in spring 2002, Dr. Jackson has lectured widely in Europe and the United States, speaking about "The Unintended Consequences of Developing Biotechnologies"; "The History and Philosophy of Attention Deficit Disorder"; "Drug-Induced Psychiatric Emergencies"; and "The Limitations of Biological Psychiatry". She has spoken at international conferences featuring highly respected clinicians, such as Dr. David Healy (The Antidepressant Era and The Creation of Psychopharmacology); Dr. David Stein (Ritalin Is Not The Answer); and Dr. Bertram Karon (Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia: The Treatment of Choice).

 

 

Now people say,’Geez Doc, so what’s happening in this nerve ending?’ This is the nerve terminal, which is the focus of attention for psychiatrists. A message comes from the first cell, (you remember what I said about writing a letter, and the nerve tries to send the letter across this space, like putting a letter in a post box). If it’s successful it’s going to find a recipient, which will be another cell, another neuron, and the cell that receives the letters has to have a mail-drop. The mail-drops are called receptors. They sit on that cell and they wait for a letter to come, waiting for a transmitter. They wait for some chemical to come and hit the receptor. What happens inside the body is a response (and this really is the gist of my lecture, is for you to be thinking and to encourage your physicians, or physicians you know, to be thinking about how the body compensates for, or responds to the Centre for Community Mental Health – University of Central England in Birmingham 4 medication.) What appears to be the case is that whenever you start turning off the flow of letters, you begin diminishing the (net) rate of chemical transmissions in the brain. Guess what? You remember the Newton quote at the start; ‘For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction’ (APPENDIX C). Well, in the human brain, it seems that “For every action, there is an unequal and sometimes unpredictable reaction.” (APPENDIX D) When you begin decreasing the flow of (neuro) transmission, the number of receptors changes- it goes up. This is a very important thing to understand; it explains why some people get withdrawal or discontinuation syndromes when they stop taking their medication or when their medication is lowered in dose. It also explains why some people may become more sensitive to side effects over time, because now there are more receptors there, waiting for the chemical. This idea of receptor change is something that is very important and something that very few physicians share with their patients. Alternatively, what could happen is that the person who is taking the medication experiences an increase in the flow of messages - the neurotransmitters could actually get revved up. Dopamine or serotonin could really get revved up, and guess what? The body reacts to that. And when the flow of transmissions gets revved up, the number of receptors usually goes down. This may be an explanation for why some people go back to their doctor and say, “I’m not feeling good. I’ve been on this medicine for six weeks, and I felt pretty good for the first six weeks but now, either they gave me a bad dose at the pharmacy, or it was a bad lot, but the medicine is just not cutting it anymore”. So this idea of down-regulation – when receptors disappear or stop responding – this is something that can result in people saying that the medicine has worn off. With an anti-depressant, for instance, some people refer to this phenomenon as Prozac “poop-out”. It means, basically, that tolerance develops to the effects of a drug. This is precisely what happens to some people who drink alcohol and they eventually find that they can drink more and more, because their receptors keep going down and down. And then psychiatrists always blame the patient (for Prozac poop-out). I said this the other day at a lecture, and I think one of the psychiatrists in the audience almost had a seizure! I kept saying they always blame the patient and he said, “You mean the underlying disease?” and I said “yes, like I said they always blame the patient!” Many doctors, in my experience, have been extremely reluctant to give credit to their clients or their patients. They seem to feel they are a different species and that it ‘couldn’t happen to me’. We’re all human, we’re all capable of psychosis and depression, we all could go there. So, with receptor change, the evidence is based on animal and human studies. Another aspect of medications which doctors frequently don’t share with patients is the fact that there are many types of receptors. Some physicians may be asked by a patient: “how will this medicine affect my brain?” and they will say something about the dopamine (D2) receptor. At least, I imagine some doctors have said that. What they’re probably not telling you is that there are five types of dopamine receptors. And when it comes to serotonin receptors, there are fifteen different types. For a doctor to very simplistically say the drug will only block the dopamine 2 receptor, he should hopefully be thinking about the other four receptors being blocked, as well. Many doctors have a very simplistic understanding of just what these drugs are doing to other kinds of receptors, even when it’s the same molecule involved. And this will become important as we move to some of the side effects.

 

Antipsychotics and the Major Dopamine Circuits of the Brain Next, we’re going to focus on antipsychotic medications

 

I am skipping parts you can read it all at the link

 

.Next, there is another circuit which physicians seldom speak about - called the tuberoinfundibular. It’s probably such a long word that this is why the doctors don’t often say it! What it means is that there’s another place in the brain that makes dopamine - the hypothalamus - and this is probably the most critical section of the human brain for the control of metabolism. The hypothalamus is located under (hypo) the thalamus. It releases many hormones that communicate with the pituitary gland. This is why patients who are on anti-psychotic medications end up with elevations in prolactin. Male patients can develop enlarged breast tissue, if you’re a woman you might start to secrete milk, probably have your periods stop. And individuals (particularly females) who stay on these medicines long term may actually develop osteoporosis. That is a long term side effect (of the elevated prolactin.) And there is some concern that if prolactin remains elevated throughout the life span; a patient may be at increased risk for heart disease or breast cancer. In sum, there are serious effects associated with anti-psychotic drugs that are related to these other circuits, which doctors seldom tell their patients about. And finally, there’s a fourth circuit. Hopefully this is something all patients have been told about when it comes to anti-psychotics. This pathway involves the movement centre of the human brain. This is called the nigrostriatal pathway. This is another location in the brain where dopamine is made and released. Dopamine gets made inside cells of a brain region called the substantia nigra (The cells are named for the way they appear - especially under the microscope. They look black due to the fact that they contain pigment. Hence, they are called nigral cells). Substantia nigra cells send dopamine from the midbrain into other brain regions: most importantly, the basal ganglia. These latter structures include: the caudate, the putamen, the globus pallidus and the subthalamic nucleus. The bottom line is that the doctor should have told you that if you are taking anti-psychotic medication, the drug will block receptors in the substantia nigra (and the striatum) and turn off the flow of dopamine into the caudate and putamen. This is why many people develop the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease from these medications. They’ll get tired; they might start moving more slowly, and if they stay on these medications for a very long time there’s a 5% risk per year of developing an irreversible condition known as tardive dyskinesia. But hopefully doctors who give these medications are warning their patients about these disorders. So, what about the newer medicines? Well, the jury is still out about whether these medications will cause Tardive Dyskinesia because these medications haven’t been out long enough to know. It took doctors fourteen years to acknowledge Tardive Dyskinesia after the first generation of neurolpetics was created. So far, it appears to be true that fewer patients develop Parkinsonian side effects, depending on the dose of these new medicines. Interestingly what many doctors don’t tell their Centre for Community Mental Health – University of Central England in Birmingham 6 patients about Risperdal (risperidone) as that it seems to be the only one of the newer drugs that causes a prolonged elevation of prolactin.

 

There is so much more but my brain is boggled enough for now you read it... then we can talk about it....

http://psychrights.org/Drugs/DrJacksonUCELecture(UK)09.06.04.pdf

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btdt

With regards to the antidepressant medications: many people may not also realise that many individuals who receive serotonergic antidepressants, such as Prozac (Fluoxetine), Seroxat (Paroxetine) Zoloft or Lustral (sertraline) and many more; all of these are in the family of serotonergic anti-depressants. Many patients who take these drugs also develop Parkinsonian side effects. What many people might not have been told by their doctors about antidepressants is that just as there is a Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome with antipsychotic medicines, there’s a baby version of this: patients who take Prozac or Zoloft might experience something called Serotonin Syndrome. It’s almost like Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome but it’s not quite as severe, and does not appear to cause death.

Violence and suicide: these are possible drug reactions that a doctor is not typically going to tell patients about. If you take Prozac and Luvox (Faverin = fluvoxamine) it might make you more prone to suicide. Maybe you saw the programme on BBC called “Secrets of Seroxat”. It’s a very important topic right now in the United States, as it has been here in the U.K, looking at the potential for serotonergic and other anti depressants to actually contribute to violence or suicide in some individuals who receive these medications. It’s probably not a high percent of people, but when you think about how many people are receiving these medicines it turns out to be a large number of individuals who have been affected.

http://psychrights.org/Drugs/DrJacksonUCELecture(UK)09.06.04.pdf

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btdt

 

Grace E Jackson MD

https://www. graceejacksonmd.com/

  1.  

 

private practice psychiatrist in Cottonwood AZ specializing in neurotoxicology and iatrogenic (treatment related) harm.

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https://isepp.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/gracepresentation.pdf

 

Recap I. What’s killing the mentally ill ? sicker, lifespan (13 to 30 yrs) II. America’s drug problem drugs are #3 cause of death each year III. Brain Damage IV. Brain Repair PharmARRU, Nutrition, Lifestyle

 

You may not want to know and I thought of posting it all but I would catch hell as it is too long... I hope your read it and look up type 3 diabetes if nothing else. 

 

Treatments 

coffee may be good for you after all... maybe not today tho...

 

Treatment

Gingko biloba

Many neuroscientists and clinical researchers have proposed that the insulinsensitizing effects of Gingko may be of benefit to dementia patients. Although clinical trials in humans have yielded variable results, some patients have experienced significant improvements in cognition and/or reductions in the rate of mental deterioration.

 

Chromium picolinate is another insulin sensitizer that reduces body weight and lowers glucose and fats in the bloodstream. Via these mechanisms, it has been proposed as a potential supplement in the treatment of diabetes-related dementias. Often used by body builders to assist with fat loss, chromium has been found to enhance several cognitive tasks in at least one study of older adults.

 

Research involving the use of curcumin as a treatment for dementia is still in an early phase of development. Limited investigations in human patients have yielded equivocal results, but many scientists remain hopeful about the potential of curcumin to reverse or prevent “type III” diabetes through its effects upon insulin and other properties (e.g., metal ion chelation). Note: *Curcumin must be used with caution in patients who are already taking medications for high blood pressure, diabetes, and/or the prevention of blood clots and stroke. Due to its effects on the biliary system, curcumin is not recommended for patients with gallbladder disease.

 

antioxidants Polyphenols resveratrol red wine, grapeseed extract green tea (Epigallo-catechin-3-gallate) Vitamin C citrus, strawberries, tomatoes Omega 3 DHA and EPA (Gingko, curcumin)

 

At least 50% of pharmaceuticals interfere with the absorption and excretion of essential nutrients. Among the various classes of psychiatric medications, the most renowned “depleters” of vitamins are the anticonvulsants (such as Dilantin, Depakote, Tegretol). Particularly for patients maintained on combinations of prescription drugs, clinical providers should consider the possibility of cognitive, emotional, and/or behavioral changes which may reflect inadequate tissue levels of B vitamins, vitamin D3 (e.g., 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol), and Co-enzyme Q10 (ubiquinone). B1 = thiamine B6 = pyridoxine B9 = folate B12 = cyanocobalamin

 

Studies of humans and laboratory animals have repeatedly suggested a positive link between caffeine and brain health. For example, the recent CAIDE study in Finland revealed that mid-life coffee consumption (3-5 cups per day) conferred protective benefits against dementia in old age. Scientists have identified several possible mechanisms which may account for these findings. In numerous rodent experiments, caffeinated water or caffeinated coffee has been found to reduce the synthesis of beta-amyloid (the protein which forms the core of senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease); accelerate the removal of beta-amyloid from the brain; and enhance the rate of cerebrospinal fluid production. As dementia researchers increasingly turn their attention to the role of cerebrospinal fluid *stasis as a risk factor for neurodegenerative conditions, important knowledge will emerge about dietary and pharmaceutical substances which affect this process. *stasis = stagnation > meaning, diminished production, decreased circulation, and impaired absorption – of the fluid which bathes the brain and removes waste products and metabolites

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Pharmaceutical Avoidance = the most prudent form of treatment for psychiatric patients *avoids the use of neurotoxic drugs Pharmaceutical Reduction = for active users of medication, the most prudent treatment involves harm reduction – a strategy of carefully modifying existing regimens by stopping drugs immediately when indicated; and by reducing doses as quickly as patients can safely tolerate Responsible Use = whenever psychiatric drugs are prescribed, their use requires extensive preparation and medical knowledge * avoiding neurotoxic drugs -- while this statement may seem like common sense, the current American health care system encourages (if not coerces) the use of brain-damaging treatments. This situation will not change until policy makers, administrators, hospitals, clinics, and others protect clinicians and patients who value safer, more effective treatments

same link as above

 

"Research involving several “recreational” stimulants, such as MDMA (Ecstasy) and methamphetamine, has proven that oxidative stress is a cause of damage to axons and nerve endings in the brain regions associated with Parkinson’s disease. Similar processes occur with pharmaceuticals. A robust body of evidence links prescription stimulants and antidepressants to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. Treatment-induced modifications of serotonin and dopamine levels, followed by the spontaneous oxidation of these chemicals, may explain how this happens. In other words, prescription drugs – just like street drugs – induce oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in the brain. Depending upon the location and intensity of this damage, various neurodegenerative conditions can and do emerge."

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Rockingchaircat

The cure is worse than the disease. Big surprise.

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bubbles

I've just given up caffeinated coffee - maybe I could rethink that!

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manymoretodays

Grace E Jackson MD

https://www. graceejacksonmd.com/
  1.  
  2.  
private practice psychiatrist in Cottonwood AZ specializing in neurotoxicology and iatrogenic (treatment related) harm.

 

 

Yay on all this stuff you shared btdt.  I'm going to look and see how far Cottonwood AZ. is from my present location.  Not sure I will see her but am tickled that there is another Dr. here in the States who is not afraid to share their awareness of the ever growing problem.  I think Glenmullen is the Dr. at or out of Harvard, East Coast.  And it sure does seem they are talking and more aware in the UK and Australia.........so........as I said this makes me very happy and hopeful.  Thanks btdt.  Great stuff you are finding.

 

MMT

 

And oh, everytime I got to the mental health site I used to frequent it seems there is another child going through some pretty horrendous stuff(parents posting) and I always want to ask..........what meds. did the doctor have them on prior to their incidence of  schizophrenia/psychosis/bipolar(in a 7 year old or a 14 year old.......there might have been a 3 y.o. even!!!!!!) but it seems to me it might just add injury to an already troubled Dr. trusting parent.  Especially since my gut feeling would be that they "might" ask the doctor but "probably" would be written off as looney or the cause of their childs distress(I can't believe that still happens in this day and age)........either that or disregarded completely by a Dr. managing a whole ward full of mentally distressed children.  And then.......if........say the parent "got it" then where do they go for further help........I mean hands on help and harm reduction for their child.........

 

Idk........a little off topic but I just had to get that out.  Sometimes it seems we can do so little.  Yah, I could refer them all here.  Sure wish I knew how to link articles and videos though that might get them directly to the information that could be live changing for their children.

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manymoretodays

Well.......fingers crossed everyone.  I called Dr. Grace Jackson in Arizona.  There is a Dr. Grace E. Jackson listed as well in N. Carolina, which would just not be doable..........soooooooo.........I hope I got the one whose blurbs you posted btdt.  She/they are out of the office until May 31st and then no new patients until August........which would be doable with a trip to my Mum as well further south...........ugh, but not if she is not the correct doctor listed here.

 

Again  Grace E. Jackson is in N. Carolina.  Grace Jackson is in Cottonwood, AZ.

 

Fingers crossed that she is in AZ and will be an asset to my continued healing!

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btdt

Wow it would be a dream come true to see this doctor... I sure hope she is in Arizona ... can't wait to hear back from you.  How would one get health insurance to see a U.S. doctor... or would I have to pay in cash.. do they take cash in the U.S?  

 

if you ever find her and see her ask her how much please. 

 

Those kids stories gut me too... I do know how to link but I am not up to being hero now.. I can barely look after myself. It would take a slew of doctors to start training other doctors how to change this... I vote for Dr Glenmullen.. or this one Jackson what a team they would make ... put them together doing videos to train doctors... as they are too valuable to send in person... real hurting humans need them.

 

There is not excuse for doctors not to know if I can find this online they can too... 

peace 

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manymoretodays

Yes, it would.......be a dream to see the Dr. Jackson who wrote the stuff you shared.  I will definitely let you know if I get an "in" or even if she is the same one.  It won't be until after May 31st.......as the phone msg. said they won't check msgs. until then and are out of the office from yesterday until then.......  And then it does sound like she is crazy busy BUT taking some new patients from a list in August.  So I did, in my msg., ask to get on the list.

 

If she is the "one"......yah, I may have to pay full as well.........and would do so too!  I WILL keep you posted.

 

I share your cautious enhusiasm.......I really do.  I feel nearly fully healed just thinking about my "possible" appointment.  :)

 

Yes, the children btdt!!!  Let us all work to save the children!!!!!!!  Yes......the education of Dr.'s....... and also the collaborative creation of something in the health care system that teaches and supports families how to manage children who aren't all in the "normal expectations" mold of behaviors.

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btdt

What kid was ever in the expected mould you never know what you will get some are disabled some profoundly and it use to be only those who were offered up and lab rats now kids thought normal enough 40 years ago are sick as can be and need meds it is insane.  

 

Good luck with the doc I hope it is her. She has to be some place... if not there some other place I would get on the list.. it can't be any longer than wd can last.. that is for sure. 

thanks and peace

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btdt

"Regrettably, every time I am interviewed by journalists about  “premature death” in patients who take antipsychotic drugs ,  I  mention BRAIN MEDIATED  DEATH. The journalists never include my comments, apparently because they cannot grasp the concept  that the brain  controls the  heart and the lungs  …………. [of course, cardiologists and pulmonologists want neurologists to believe that the heart and lungs control the brain ]……..

hope this information is helpful to you —–  I’ll post a few references for those who would like to read more.

Grace"

https://beyondmeds.com/2011/02/21/antipsychoticsgracejackson/

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manymoretodays

Well......nothing yet heard.  I can try and call the Dr. Grace Jackson in Az. again next week though.  And will keep you posted.........all I have to ask her or one of her staff is if she is the Dr. who specializes in neurotoxicology and iatrogenic harm.  Hope so.  She might be a good one for the list here at SA......

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btdt

This is her website it is her I recognise her face... 

https://www.graceejacksonmd.com/

 

Grace E Jackson MD PLLC

115 S. Candy Lane - Suite C2

Cottonwood AZ  86326

 

Phone:  928 649 6736 this number is registered to her name 

Appointments: 928 963 1018

After Hours:  928 963 0343  reverse look up on this number says it is mobile in AZ

 

I bet she is worked to death... if she isn't now she will be should word get out but I bet she is now. 

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manymoretodays

Ah......the beauty of smart phone logs.  I had called the first one that you listed btdt on May 24th.  And yes......she is surely busy with regular patient catch up, as well as having a very busy practice.........so........I best be patient..........but........I will try the appointment # next to make sure I am on her wait list at the least and hope to see her late August or even this upcoming fall.........I suppose I could try the web site as well.......

 

As far as your other question above about paying cash........some will do that.......others won't.........best case, for me.......is that yah.......she takes my insurance.......but like you I would be willing to pay cash for somebody in the know to help provide further guidance and then maybe just to see if she can be an asset for some in this SA community and beyond.  As I am doing well enough today.......and yesterday............may this be the start of long window!

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nz11

Just read post one it was very good

thankyou for introducing me to G Jackson.

I need to read more.

nz11

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btdt

If MMT gets an appointment we will get to see the value of Grace Jackson smarts... I hope she can get in.  NZ Grace wrote a couple of books I had to send away to get them and when they came I was in a brain freeze a bit like what I am having now it is really a random thing.  It can come and stay a long time wks or it can be a few hours and gone or it can come and go for extended times... a few hours at a time.. it is quite scary.  

 

I can't seem to sort out any reason for it... today it may have been a reaction to sunscreen but I can't be sure...Maybe Grace would know ;)

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manymoretodays

I got a callback from Dr. Grace Jackson's office today.  I was out and about but the msg. left said they were in tomorrow and to call back then!!!!  I left a msg. for them as well......that I received their msg. and would call back tomorrow!!!!!

 

Kind of excited..........will meditate or something so I can get more information from them and they from me..........so more news on this later.  I am really excited!

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btdt

I am excited for you and us to learn if there is more we can do.. learn now to advance our healing.  I feel quite proud of you for stepping out like this I don't know why it feels kind of odd but it just is so I will take it and express it to you... way to go MMT!  Seeing her is like turning over one of the sacred rocks in seeking wellness one that feels very far away to me as she may as well be on the moon... this is the moon walk of wd...  :D

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btdt

The Vit C I just started taking says it is helps in bone and teeth help... all about vit C 

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manymoretodays

Wow......in a good way.  I am just today looking through the paperwork sent to me by Dr. Jackson's intake staff.

 

In particular her philosophy of care, treatment approach, and treatment rights and responsibilities 

 

Almost......just almost in tears.......as my neuroemotions ARE improved somewhat.

 

I can only say.......I am going to see Dr. Grace!!!!!  I am honored and blessed to be close enough and fortunate enough to fund this endeavor.  And I will do my best to share what she offers in my journal pages.

 

Just really wowed.......thanks btdt for posting all that you have read of her.  The 22nd just can't come soon enough.......that's when I get to schedule my hopefully September appointment with her.

 

(okay.....a few tears......the good kind though)  :)

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btdt

To be expected I think any source of hope certainly can bring tears for may of us on our best days. I hope she is as good as we need her to be... better than what we have at least is what I expect.  This thread is now joined to the other Grace thread which makes it very bloated sorry it is what it is.  I hope the size does not deter new people from getting to this point it is a lot to read at one time for anybody in wd... depending on the stage of wd.. for some it will be impossible. I will maintain the faith that if you suppose to be here you will get here. 

 

Take good care MMT I wish you peace.

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anonymous4317

MMT I hope your appointment goes well! :)

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manymoretodays

Thank you anony.  Calling to schedule tomorrow.......meanwhile getting my history gathered and dropping off forms to providers.  It won't be until late September, early October.  Might be just the tool to avoid the hole of a wave of  that  "Winter of 2016" was.......here is to a lovely winter of 2017 and a whole lot of hope.  I mean how can I go wrong with somebody I've already nicknamed as the Dr. of Grace. 

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btdt

Great name ;) 

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anonymous4317

Thank you anony.  Calling to schedule tomorrow.......meanwhile getting my history gathered and dropping off forms to providers.  It won't be until late September, early October.  Might be just the tool to avoid the hole of a wave of  that  "Winter of 2016" was.......here is to a lovely winter of 2017 and a whole lot of hope.  I mean how can I go wrong with somebody I've already nicknamed as the Dr. of Grace. 

 

I hope things are going smoothly! :)

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manymoretodays

Yes anonymous4317.  Things are going.........fairly smoothly.  Thank you for the hope.  :)

 

And just deciding now.......as my scheduled appointment with Dr. Grace is only about 2 weeks out now...........if I should reschedule for a bit later in October or even early November.  I have got to take care of some financial concerns and other stuff before wholeheartedly travel and Dr. planning.

 

mmt

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btdt

Yes anonymous4317.  Things are going.........fairly smoothly.  Thank you for the hope.  :)

 

And just deciding now.......as my scheduled appointment with Dr. Grace is only about 2 weeks out now...........if I should reschedule for a bit later in October or even early November.  I have got to take care of some financial concerns and other stuff before wholeheartedly travel and Dr. planning.

 

mmt

I fell off the earth... mmt...

 

did you go?

 

if you did what happened?

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