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Punarbhava

Hibiscus

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Punarbhava

Hibiscus is a primary ingredient in many herbal teas. I was surprised to find the following information.

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http://www.buzzle.com/articles/hibiscus-tea-side-effects.html

 

Hibiscus Tea Side Effects

 

It is not unlikely to come across hibiscus tea side effects. Almost all kinds of herbal remedies have their own share of side effects. Read more...

 

The hibiscus refers to a genus of plants that comprises of about 220 species. ...... Many herbalist tout for the ability of the hibiscus tea to treat a variety of medical ailments from common cold, swelling, poor appetite, high blood pressure, stomach disorders to upper respiratory tract disorders.

 

However, behind all such benefits of drinking this tea, there are a number of side effects too, which may not be so pleasant. Know what these hibiscus tea side effects are from what follows.

 

Side Effects of Hibiscus Tea

 

The hibiscus tea side effects do not occur for everyone who consumes it. There are certain conditions which when met, give rise to the occurrence of the side effects.

 

For instance, as the tea is well-known for its blood-pressure lowering quality, it should not be taken by people with hypotension (low blood pressure). According to a study conducted by a medical research center, people who frequently drink this herbal tea, experience a reduction of 7.2 points in their systolic blood pressure.

 

So this implies that people with low blood pressure must not consume this tea lest, there may occur severe complications such as faintness, dizziness, weakness, or in some cases, damage to the heart or brain.

 

 

One of the common hibiscus tea side effects may be an effect that may be similar to experiencing hallucinations. Which is why, people who are consuming the tea for the first time, are advised not to go for driving or any other activity, wherein sleepiness may be dangerous.

 

The chemicals in the hibiscus plant affect the estrogen levels, especially in women. So one of the hibiscus tea problems is hormonal changes in the body. This may particularly affect people who had undergone hormone replacement therapy, or women who are using birth control pills.

 

 

It is not sure whether drinking hibiscus tea risks the health of the unborn child during pregnancy. So it is advisable for expecting mothers to avoid its use

 

Certain chemicals in the plant are known to attack cancer cells that affect the skin and the brain . So, people who are already on drugs for treating cancer, must not consume the hibiscus tea. Otherwise, hibiscus tea side effects may occur in the form of an additive effect on the treatment, and worsen the condition.

 

Other hibiscus flower tea side effects may flare up when the tea is taken in conjunction with inflammatory drugs.

 

Having dealt with the basic and common hibiscus tea side effects, here is a short description on the benefits of this herbal tea.

 

Hibiscus Tea Benefits

 

One of the most important hibiscus tea benefit is its antioxidant nature. It helps in neutralizing the effect of free radicals in the body.

 

Drinking hibiscus tea as a regular part of the diet, boosts the immune system, helps in cell development, and reduces risks of cancer and cataracts.

 

As mentioned already, this herbal tea helps in lowering elevated blood pressure level, and treats liver disorders. Since the tea reduces high cholesterol, it is beneficial for reducing the risk of developing heart diseases.

 

Being a natural antispasmodic, the tea made from the hibiscus flowers relieves muscle spasm, menstrual cramps and even abdominal cramps.

 

Taking the tea after meal, stimulates metabolism thus, helps in breaking down the starch and sugar. This eventually aids in losing weight.

 

As the tea is rich in vitamin C, it helps the body to have a speedy recovery from illnesses such as cold and flu.

 

There aren't may hibiscus tea side effects, which may seem to bother many people, as you can infer from the above data. And looking at so many benefits of the herbal tea, the side effects may be considered negligible or of less importance.

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http://www.healthline.com/natstandardcontent/hibiscus/3?brand=

 

 

Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.)

 

Category

Herbs & Supplements

 

 

Synonyms

 

Ambary plant (Hibiscus cannabinus), burao (Hibiscus tiliaceus), chemparathampoo, erragogu, esculetin, gogu (Hibiscus cannabinus), Hibiscus protocatechuic acid (PCA), Hibiscus mutabilis, Hibiscus rosasinensis, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Hibiscus sabdariffa, Hibiscus syriacus, Hibiscus taiwanensis, Hibiscus tiliaceus, Jamaican red sorrel, Karkadi, karkada, karkade (Arabic), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), Malvaceae (family), red sorrel (English), roselle (English), sour tea, tellagogu, zobo drink.

 

Note: This monograph does not include okra (Abelmoschus esculentus, formerly classified as Hibiscus esculentus) or Norfolk Island hibiscus (Lagunaria patersonii).

 

 

Background

 

The Hibiscus genus contains several species, many of which have been used medicinally. ......Hibiscus sabdariffa and compounds isolated from it (for example, anthocyanins and hibiscus protocatechuic acid) are likely candidates for future studies. There is limited reported safety data about hibiscus, although it is popularly used as a tea........

 

 

Evidence

 

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

 

Hypertension (high blood pressure): Extracts of hibiscus may lower the systolic and diastolic pressure. Additional studies are needed to confirm these results, although the use of hibiscus for lowering blood pressure looks promising.

Grade: B

 

 

Lice: Currently, there is limited available evidence evaluating the effects of hibiscus for the treatment of lice. Additional study is warranted in this area.

Grade: C

 

 

 

Tradition

 

 

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven.

 

Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

 

 

Antibacterial (melioidosis), antifungal, antioxidant, antipyretic (fever reducer), antiviral, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), cancer, contraceptive, flavoring agent, hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol), leukemia, liver diseases, liver protection, pain (antinociceptive), renal stone disease, weight loss.

 

 

To learn more about dosing, please visit the web site listed above.

 

 

Safety

 

 

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

 

 

Allergies

 

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to hibiscus, its constituents, or members of the Malvaceae family. Reported allergy symptoms include skin rash and hives.

 

 

Side Effects and Warnings

 

There is limited reported safety data about hibiscus, although it is popularly used as a tea.

 

Although not well studied in humans, excessive doses of hibiscus for relatively long periods may have antifertility effects. One study found that hibiscus tea contained polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs have been associated with birth defects and cancer . The sources of PAHs in food are predominantly from environmental pollution and food processing. Use cautiously in patients with hypertension or hypotension (high or low blood pressure), as hibiscus may lower blood pressure.

 

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

 

Hibiscus is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. However, Hibiscus tiliaceus has been used throughout the Vanuatu archipelago to speed childbirth. In theory, excessive doses of hibiscus for relatively long periods may have antifertility activity, and caution is advised.

 

 

Interactions

 

Interactions with Drugs

 

Although not well studied in humans, hibiscus may have anticancer effects. Thus, caution is advised when taking hibiscus with other anticancer agents

.

 

Extracts of hibiscus may lower the systolic and diastolic pressure. Patients taking blood pressure lowering agents should use hibiscus cautiously due to additive effects. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

 

 

Zobo drink (made from hibiscus) may change the way certain anti-inflammatory agents, such as acetaminophen, are processed in the body. Caution is advised when taking anti-inflammatory agents and hibiscus within a two-hour period of one another.

 

Karkadi beverage (Hibiscus sabdarifa) may reduce antimalarial (quinine, chloroquine) efficacy.

 

Antiviral effects have been observed in preliminary laboratory study. In theory, hibiscus taken with other antiviral agents may have additive effects.

 

 

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis may have estrogenic activity, although the clinical significance is unclear. Use hibiscus cautiously in patients taking hormone altering agents, such as hormone replacement therapy or birth control pills.

 

 

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

 

Although not well studied in humans, hibiscus may have anticancer effects. Thus, caution is advised when taking hibiscus with other anticancer agents.

 

Extracts of hibiscus may lower the systolic and diastolic pressure. Patients taking herbs that lower blood pressure should use hibiscus cautiously due to additive effects. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

 

In theory, Karkadi beverage (Hibiscus sabdarifa) may reduce the efficacy of antimalarial herbs and supplements.

 

Antiviral effects have been observed in preliminary laboratory study. In theory, hibiscus taken with other herbs with antiviral activity may have additive effects.

 

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis may have estrogenic activity, although the clinical significance is unclear. Use hibiscus cautiously in patients taking hormone altering herbs or supplements.

 

 

Attribution

 

This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): J. Kathryn Bryan, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Shaina Tanguay-Colucci, BS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration).

 

Bibliography

DISCLAIMER: Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com

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Patience

I had some hibiscus tea in a cafe several months ago. I woke up the next morning feeling like I had a hangover, like I'd been drugged the night before. Mint is the only herbal tea I feel safe drinking.

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Altostrata

Same with me. I've tried tea containing hibiscus and it made me feel weird, as most herbal teas do, including rooibos. (Pre-withdrawal, I used to love to drink all kinds of teas.)

 

Now I only drink peppermint or very dilute chamomile.

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Punarbhava

Count me in as well. Not only did I feel strange but also very incredibly sick. At the time, I figured it was the hibicus in the flavored teas but I was too sick to do any research.

 

Anyway, I decided to conduct a inter-net search the other day and thus, posted some info.

 

Gosh, we can be so sensitive to so many things during WD.

 

I can't even drink any of the mint teas nor ginger teas. They make me feel very nauseous. It's like I get a paradoxical reaction to the teas that are suppose to be good for nausea.

 

 

Consequently, I have a mug of plain boiled water if I crave something hot. :(

 

 

Pun

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