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Smoking cessation, nicotine, e-cigs

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Fizz

Any opinions upon smoking cigarettes during withdrawal? Of course we know how detrimental this is to health anyhow, I'm desperately trying to cut down from around 10 a day, but anxiety gets the better of me, I will have a few puffs and then put it out frequently during the day......

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Sparrow

I smoke more than you and have been working on cutting down these past few months. Being at home, and thus able to light up at any time 24/7, makes it all the more difficult.

 

For me, for right now, nothing is more important than successfully recovering from my multiple psych drug withdrawals. Quitting smoking is just going to have to wait. Simply thinking about it makes me anxious.

 

Few substances are as horrifically addictive as nicotine. Do what you can, when you can.

 

Sparrow

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GiaK

yes...harm reduction do what you can when you can...

 

I smoked when I first started withdrawing...but came to a place where I had to quit...my sensitivities struck nicotine and the cigs started deeply sickening me...it actually made quitting easy...though the whole ordeal was anything but easy in a broader sense...I did lose a big coping strategy and that meant having to deal with fall-out

 

anyway...I've been smoke free for about 7 years now. I don't miss them at all anymore

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dunerbug

I quit in 2002 after smoking for 8 years.

 

Then shortly after quitting prozac, I had strong urges to smoke. My husband smoked, so I could easily get some. I started to smoke 2-3 a week. I find this strange considering the urge came right after stopping the med.

 

Luckily, the cigs made withdrawal worse, so I *couldn't* smoke. I haven't had one since Dec.

 

I noticed the weird urge coming back though the last week or so. Strange.

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alexjuice

yes...harm reduction do what you can when you can...

 

I smoked when I first started withdrawing...but came to a place where I had to quit...my sensitivities struck nicotine and the cigs started deeply sickening me...it actually made quitting easy...though the whole ordeal was anything but easy in a broader sense...I did lose a big coping strategy and that meant having to deal with fall-out

 

anyway...I've been smoke free for about 7 years now. I don't miss them at all anymore

 

I quit smoking using nicotine replacement gum 6 months before I started tapering. I was still chewing a lot of nicotine gum when I entered w/d and I continued to do so for a while until the gum started to bother me at which point I switched to a xylitol, nicotine-free gum because I had become very accustomed to chewing.

 

Eventually, due to w/d related symptoms, I stopped chewing the gum.

 

Today, I find cigarette smoke extremely nauseating and overpowering. I am far too sensitive and have no temptation to ever smoke.

 

This is unlike prior periods of tobacco abstention. In 2006 I did not smoke at all and I occasionally fondly thought of cigarettes and frequently enjoyed the smell of smoke and wished I could smoke. Sometimes I fought off tough cravings.

 

I used nicotine products (the gum) for a year or so after I stopped taking Effexor/Risperdal. So I understand that too much change can be overwhelming or simply unrealistic. On the other hand, cigarettes are believed to negatively impact the immune system which would be my primary reason for considering disconinuation.

 

I have a poorly functioning immune system -- based on objective blood tests like those given to HIV patients -- and I suspect a large portion of my w/d syndrome -- including near-diabetic insulin resistance and gut infection -- is all intertwined with my immune function. (I also suffered a confouding toxic exposure>)

 

If breathing in Marlboro smoke weakens the immune system (which I think it probably does but I'm not about to try to prove) that would be reason enough for me to consider quitting if possible. Certainly, I wouldn't START smoking to allievate w/d symptoms.

 

That's my opinion, in all humility.

 

Good luck,

Alex

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elbillingino

I really want to smoke but will resist! I've stopped a couple of times, the most recent being last year (before I was in withdrawal). It's the not starting again that's the hard part!

 

I must say, being able to objectively compare the two, for me nicotine withdrawal was much easier than antidepressant withdrawal. It only lasts for a few weeks for a start (at least, that's what all the medical authorities say - and that was my experience - but I wouldn't be too surprised if it lasts considerably longer for some people).

 

Fighting a battle on two fronts would be absolute hell though.

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DazedNConfused

Hi guys

 

You'll have to forgive me if I've doubled up on a topic, or even if I've put it in the wrong spot. I did a search for this information, but couldn't find anything that answered my question.

 

So, I've been spending a LOT of time considering quitting smoking. In fact, I desperately want to quit as I feel (know) that the 4000+ chemicals are hindering my recovery (Duh!). The only problem is that I have this little voice in the back of my head that is absolutely terrified of withdrawing from anything again. I went through absolute hell withdrawing from alcohol and then from antidepressants, and although I'm far from being cured I have definitely made leaps and bounds in terms of progress and recovery. 

 

So, I guess I'm asking if it is possible that I could slide backwards if I go into withdrawal again? Like, back to square one? The thought terrifies me and to be honest, even talking about it is making me nauseous and sweaty. Should I wait until I feel I'm strong enough to handle the slide backwards, should it occur? I have no choice but to go CT. NRT doesn't do a damn thing for me.

 

Or, am I just making a mountain out of a molehill? Am I just making excuses to not quit? The anxiety is killing me.

 

Has anyone done it with minimal discomfort or disturbance to their recovery? Should I just suck it up?

 

I'm in tears right now, and I'd really appreciate some feedback.

 

Thank you

 

Amy

 

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Petunia

Hi Amy,

I don't know anything about how quitting smoking effects withdrawal, I've never smoked, so I don't even know what that's like but my sister has recently been successful with quitting by using electronic cigarettes. She hasn't been able to quit via any other method she tried previously and she was also going through withdrawal from other medications at the same time.  She has been able to lower her nicotine intake gradually and now needs only a very small amount.

 

I don't know too much about e-cigs, but I know that you can monitor your nicotine intake via the various cartridges, you don't get all those chemicals and you still get that hand to mouth action which seems to be helpful.

 

Here in Australia, its a bit tricky buying what you need.  I think in the eastern states you can buy the e-cigs, but have to order the nicotine cartridges internationally.  I googled "how to buy e cigarettes in australia" and got lots of options, it looks like many people order the nicotine from New Zealand.

 

Maybe this is something to consider, perhaps others will be able to share their quitting experiences while being in withdrawal.

 

Petu.

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DazedNConfused

Thank you,

 

I have been using e-cigs for about 2 years. Started off well for a week or 2, but then started smoking again as well as vaping, essentially doubling my nicotine intake (BIG mistake).

 

Thanks for the advice, and I hope others can chime in.

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Petunia

This may not be the problem, and you might know this already, but in case you don't, this may help:

 

From:  http://www.veppocig.com/how-to-choose-nicotine-strength/

 

Selecting the correct nicotine level will ensure an easy and enjoyable move to e-cigs and personal vaporizers.

 

 

1. Too low --> Smoking to compensate

Because your body has become used to having a certain amount of nicotine in it, choosing a lighter replacement than the original tobacco based cigarette will typically result in compensation smoking. This means that you will wind up smoking (or vaping) more to make up for the nicotine your body needs and craves. 

For example, if you smoke a regular strength cigarette and you choose an e-cigarette that is lighter in nicotine strength, you will unintentionally smoke (or vape) more than before to compensate for the nicotine loss and withdrawal. Your body will still crave its normal amount of nicotine and therefore you may think that the e-cigarette doesn’t work for you and you’ll go back to smoking regular cigarettes.  When, in fact, it was just a matter of customizing and changing your e-liquid nicotine strength.

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Muddles

Smoking kills me. Just becomes toxic in my body. This is how I know my receotors are so down regulated - I don't get the same feeling as I use to when having a cigarette - it makes me ill and my head just feels poisoned.

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DazedNConfused

I feel the same way. My body is begging me to stop, but I'm terrified of going backwards in my recovery. Withdrawal is withdrawal is withdrawal in my opinion. I don't want my nervous system to go into complete shock again.

 

Petu, thank you. This has crossed my mind. I will try upping my ecig nicotine levels and see how i go. I just really want to be done with it all CT. Dragging out the withdrawal suffering isn't really appealing. I just thought perhaps someone else who is going through withdrawal has successfully quit. It's not really something you can ask in quit smoking forums because a majority of the people there have no clue what its like, nor do they have any clue what I'm talking about.

 

I'm just scared (which leads me to smoke more). Sick of the vicious cycle and frustrated because i could be much further along in my recovery if i didn't smoke.

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Jemima

I would think that waiting until you feel strong enough to quit would be the way to go.  However, if smoking makes you feel sick and anxious, that may be a strong incentive.

 

I quit when I became severely depressed from Lipitor (didn't know the source of my depression at the time). I was convinced that I was worthless and didn't deserve to enjoy the pleasure of smoking, not to mention that I had been ordering small cigars online, ran out, and was too much of a mess to sign for the delivery.  Keeping in mind that I never inhaled in 47 years of smoking and that I wasn't in antidepressant withdrawal, I didn't have any noticeable withdrawal symptoms when I quit.  

 

Stay away from Chantix.  I understand it's a form of antidepressant and it made me feel like I had the flu all the time.

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cymbaltawithdrawal5600

I think I was still on AD's when I switched to ecigs. I was determined not to smoke anymore and so I gave myself permission to suck on the ecigs as much as I had to to keep from going nuts. Since I smoked ultra lights, my nic intake was kinda low so I started with 11mg nic. If you are a full flavored person, 18 to 24 is recommended. Just don't go too high if you tend to use cigs because of nervousness. Lower nic and you can puff as much as you want.

 

Be aware that you will feel like crap as the chemicals from analog cigs leave your body. It might actually help with wd symptoms as you come off. I then gradually reduced my nic content to where I am at 0 mg now and find I don't use mine much anymore, at least not like I did. I am pretty sure it has been 5 years this July since I stopped smoking. Funny how I can't remember for sure at the moment.

 

Good luck!

 

BTW, I ordered my stuff online. There is now a store in my area that will custom make the nic level you desire. If you can't get that but can get 0 mg in the flavor you want you can dilute your own.

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shamaan

Does somebody else have experience with smoking cessation or lowering? And how did it affect withdrawal?

 

I have decreased my daily cigarettes for a week or two now , and was wondering if it could be a trigger to worse waves

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blasteen

I Quit two months into withdrawal. I can tell you WD issues went from being 40% bad to 80% bad within two-three of quitting smoking. Quitting smoking suddenly will for sure effect a healthy individual and would also might effect the person in WD even more.

 

It might be easier for u since ur 2 years out. my adivce is to if u wanna withdraw from cigarettes do it slowly same as AD. like start lowering your ciggarettes nicotine dose over couple of months and slowly try to get rid of the smoking habbit by smoking electric cigarettes, the main impact on ur body will come when u fully leave ciggarettes.

 

give me pm if u need more info 

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AlexKidd

I'm currently tapering off Lexapro and I would like to try to quit smoking, I'm smoking way too much (30-40 per day.) The Lexapro is causing enough damage to me as it is, so just wanna try to live a bit healthier while I'm trying to get off it.

Just wondering if anyone has any experience of quitting smoking whilst tapering. Is it a good or bad idea?

Many thanks, Alex.

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AlexKidd

Thanks Petunia :)

I'd really like to give them up, but I'm not sure how my nervous system will react if I do. Its not easy to give up cigarettes at the best of times, it could be even more difficult while withdrawing from powerful psychoactive meds.

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Cookson

Could not find a similar post on this, am not going around deliberately duplicating posts i''m not that's malicous!

Just intrested if anyone else smokes on here? I know it can't help my recovery but when things get really difficult it's a safety net for me, like a close friend giving a me a helping hand in need. It feels like an ancient relic of more joyous happier time that it brings me back for a moement even if only slightly.

I average about 5 cigarettes a day. I May smoke more on bad days with the mentality 'I really honestly don't care anymore it can't get worse then this I need some respite'

Be good to know if I can relate to anyone on this

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Cookson

I mean if others can relate to this! Not doing fantastic cognitively today

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shamaan

I Quit two months into withdrawal. I can tell you WD issues went from being 40% bad to 80% bad within two-three of quitting smoking. Quitting smoking suddenly will for sure effect a healthy individual and would also might effect the person in WD even more.

 

It might be easier for u since ur 2 years out. my adivce is to if u wanna withdraw from cigarettes do it slowly same as AD. like start lowering your ciggarettes nicotine dose over couple of months and slowly try to get rid of the smoking habbit by smoking electric cigarettes, the main impact on ur body will come when u fully leave ciggarettes.

 

give me pm if u need more info

 

Did anybody else stopped smoking during withdrawal? And did it worsen withdrawal like it did for blasteen?

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sky68

hi smokers and ex smokers to be ;-)

 

Not planned, but I quit smoking halfway the tapering period, last September. I never had the intention to quit. But after a 'well let's try the taste of an e-cig', I immediately switched over to e-cigs and have never smoked again. Just like that, easy peasy! That after having smoked for over 30 years..

 

Since then I've never experienced any WD effects from quitting the cigarettes. Moreover, it didn't affect WD symptoms from the meds either. I think. I did have some WD symptoms every now and then, but I contribute these to the meds, not to quitting smoking.

 

Maybe it's a very personal thing, then I would consider myself very lucky!

For me, the e-cig is the invention of the century :D

 

Surprisingly enough, I started e-cigs with 20 mg of nicotine. The craving for nicotine has dimished gradually. Now I use much less nicotine (around 10 mg nowadays), my body told me to lower.

What a strange world..

 

Moreover, the positive feeling I got from quitting the cigs (being proud of myself for this) motivated me even more during tapering.

 

My guess is, don't be too harsh for yourself. It can be a great struggle to taper. Don't put too many stress on yourself by 'having' to quit smoking. Take a step at the time, unless you feel comfortable with trying to quit smoking.

 

Good luck all!

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shamaan

hi smokers and ex smokers to be ;-)

 

Not planned, but I quit smoking halfway the tapering period, last September. I never had the intention to quit. But after a 'well let's try the taste of an e-cig', I immediately switched over to e-cigs and have never smoked again. Just like that, easy peasy! That after having smoked for over 30 years..

 

Since then I've never experienced any WD effects from quitting the cigarettes. Moreover, it didn't affect WD symptoms from the meds either. I think. I did have some WD symptoms every now and then, but I contribute these to the meds, not to quitting smoking.

 

Maybe it's a very personal thing, then I would consider myself very lucky!

For me, the e-cig is the invention of the century :D

 

Surprisingly enough, I started e-cigs with 20 mg of nicotine. The craving for nicotine has dimished gradually. Now I use much less nicotine (around 10 mg nowadays), my body told me to lower.

What a strange world..

 

Moreover, the positive feeling I got from quitting the cigs (being proud of myself for this) motivated me even more during tapering.

 

My guess is, don't be too harsh for yourself. It can be a great struggle to taper. Don't put too many stress on yourself by 'having' to quit smoking. Take a step at the time, unless you feel comfortable with trying to quit smoking.

 

Good luck all!

But you still smoke e-ciggarets, instead of normale cigs?

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sky68

Yes, shamaan. Well not really. You do not smoke ecigs, you vape them ;)

 

Also I alter between nicotine levels during the day. I found that vaping lower nicotine levels in the evening gives me a clearer head when I go to bed. Anxiety levels dropped considerably.

 

But yeah I am still addicted to the nicotine, but that's fine by me. I can live with that idea :)

 

 

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Fresh

I discussed this issue with Dr Lucire in relation to my smoking.

She believes that smokers become addicted to not just the nicotine , but the cacophony of other chemicals in cigarettes

(post 1 , 4000?).  This is why nicotine patches and replacements do not work for most people.

 

E-cigs are essentially trading one addiction for another , and the fact is you have absolutely no idea what you're "vaping".  

There is an abundance of information of dangers of vaping in relation to heart and respiratory function , allergens and histamine

fluctuations etc.  Just google e-cigarettes.  See www.webmd.com , www.sciencenews.org (risks-e-cigarettes-emerge) and 94,697

other results that come up when you search for "risks , ecigs".

I would not be recommending or suggesting them to anyone if you really want to help.

 

The most successful way to stop smoking is as blasteen suggested above - taper in the same way you would taper an antidepressant , or coffee , or other drugs

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sky68

hi Fresh,

First, I don't recommend this to anybody. I merely pointed out that it helped me quitting smoking.

In normal cigarettes there are dozens of carcinogens. As far as science knows at this moment in time there are no carcinogens in ecigs.

It is, however, not sure what the effects are on the long run.

Imho it is not trading one addiction for another. In my eyes, it is eliminating lots of bad ingredients which are in normal cigs.

I do not suggest other smokers to step over to ecigs.

 

Google health benefits ecigs compared to cigarettes you will find thousands of hits as well.

 

The anti ecig ideas mostly come from gut feelings.

But we just don't know about the long term risks, yet.

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Fresh

QUOTE:     Japan Times     "E-cigs pose much higher cancer risk than thought"  28.11.2014

 

"E-cigarettes cause up to 10 times the amount of cancer causing agents as regular tobacco , Japaneses scientists

said Thursday , the latest blow to an invention once heralded as less harmful than smoking".

 

"Researchers commissioned by the Health ministry found carcinogens such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in vapor

produced by several types of e-cigarette liquid , a ministry official said.  Formaldehyde - a substance found in building materials

and embalming fluid - was present at much higher levels than carcinogens found in the smoke from regular cigarettes , the 

official said.  

 

'In one brand of e-cigarettes the team found more than 10 times the level of carcinogens contained in one regular cigarette' said

researcher Naoki Kunugita , adding that the amount of formaldehyde detected varied through the course of analysis.

Especially when the ...wire (that vaporizes the liquid) gets overheated , higher amounts of those harmful substance seemed to be produced".

 

If we google health benefits of antidepressants , there are sure to thousands of articles espousing the benefits.  Likewise ,  we need

to be discriminating in what information we choose to take on board with e-cigs. (or any other substances/supplements).  

 

Should we choose to believe what the manufacturers want us to?  

 

" Fool me once , shame on you. Fool me twice , shame on me".

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westcoast

Thing is, smokers cough up phlegm. Vapers don't. That could be a good sign for vaping. I'll look for that study, Fresh. Other thing about vapes is no matches, ashtrays, smells...

 

And to whoever asked--quitting during WD seems bad on the face of it, but you never know.

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Karenna

I quite smoking cold turkey in 1998. I told myself that it was going to be very,marry hard.....I didn't fool myself.

I had to quit all alcohol consumption and coffee too....as they were strong triggers. I exercised every morning before work to get all the angst out of my system.

I actually felt like I did not want to live anymore......besides the physical nicotine withdrawal, the mental withdrawal was really hard to deal with.

To this day....I do not know how I got through that. But, I did. After about a week.....the extremely strong and constant cravings started to wane. At first I thought about lighting up every other minute....then maybe every 20 minutes.......and so on......but you always have to be on guard because the overwhelming desire to have a cigarette could overcome you and sneak up on you in a heartbeat. And you never know what may trigger it. Just BE READY!

 

My brother died about 5 months into me quitting......he was only 38 and it was rough. I wanted to smoke so badly.....needed to. But, it was weird......I got suddenly very sick with a really, really nasty cold the day after he died. It was like the mini-flu! There was no way that my body was gonna let me suck some smoke and toxins into my lungs and body while being so I'll.

 

The cold was like an unexpected little gift from God that kept me from smoking.

 

I never, ever get cravings to smoke anymore. I wonder if there is anything in this world that could happen to me or around me that would cause me to light up. I tend to think definitely not. But, just like alcoholics have to always be on guard....I guess ex-smokers do to.

 

I found that cutting down on cigarettes did not work for me. I had to do cold turkey, but, some people do well with tapering. Eventually, you gave to go through the pain of the physical withdrawal.

Every time that I had a craving....I would take the deepest breath in that I possibly could. That really helped.

 

But, yea......quitting, in the beginning was devastating to me...I know this might sound strange to non-smokers......but when I couldn't smoke anymore.....I felt like there was no use in living!!

So.....beware of this if you are also dealing with AD withdrawal. I never thought about killing myself......I just didn't want to be alive anymore. But......I plowed through it....knew it had to get better.

 

Quitting smoking was one of the hardest things I have ever done.....but it has been the absolute smartest thing I could ever do girls myself.

I sometimes still dream that I had a cigarette and it devastates me! But thank God I wake up and all is well again. I could not even imagine how horrible my health would be today if I still smoked. I shudder to think!!

Right before I quit, I was becoming a chain smoker......I would be getting ready to put out a cigarette and was already thinking about the next one. It was absolutely becoming insatiable. I HAD TO quit!

 

I wish all you smokers on the forum the strength to stop!! I am pulling for your,!

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sky68

QUOTE:     Japan Times     "E-cigs pose much higher cancer risk than thought"  28.11.2014

 

"E-cigarettes cause up to 10 times the amount of cancer causing agents as regular tobacco , Japaneses scientists

said Thursday , the latest blow to an invention once heralded as less harmful than smoking".

 

"Researchers commissioned by the Health ministry found carcinogens such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in vapor

produced by several types of e-cigarette liquid , a ministry official said.  Formaldehyde - a substance found in building materials

and embalming fluid - was present at much higher levels than carcinogens found in the smoke from regular cigarettes , the 

official said.  

 

'In one brand of e-cigarettes the team found more than 10 times the level of carcinogens contained in one regular cigarette' said

researcher Naoki Kunugita , adding that the amount of formaldehyde detected varied through the course of analysis.

Especially when the ...wire (that vaporizes the liquid) gets overheated , higher amounts of those harmful substance seemed to be produced".

 

If we google health benefits of antidepressants , there are sure to thousands of articles espousing the benefits.  Likewise ,  we need

to be discriminating in what information we choose to take on board with e-cigs. (or any other substances/supplements).  

 

Should we choose to believe what the manufacturers want us to?  

 

" Fool me once , shame on you. Fool me twice , shame on me".

Please have a look at:

 

http://www.clivebates.com/?p=2706

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JanCarol

My journey off the drugs started with cigarettes.  I couldn't breathe.  I couldn't jog from one side of the gym to the other without having to stop and put my hands on my knees and pant, waiting for my heart to stop pounding and my head to clear (I would have brown outs if I did too much cardio).

 

So obviously, the cigs had to be the first to go.  I was determined to get my black belt (I still haven't done that) so the cigs had to go.  I did a taper and a cold turkey.  

 

I bought my last carton in Nov 2010.  10 packs, 200 cigarettes.  It helped that Australian "Dunhill" were not international quality - they were just better, cheap nasty cigarettes than the usual cheap nasty cigarettes.  The beautiful rich, tasteful cigarette I had started on - was now just another awful cigarette.  Australia really takes the pleasure out of smoking.

 

I went to all the places I loved to smoke.  To the club, with a coffee and a book.  On the balcony at our holiday resort, looking at the sea. At family gatherings when I needed to "get away."  My back porch, where I used to read and read and read (I've still not quite recovered my reading habits since quitting smoking)

 

I noticed the pluses and minuses of the cigs.  The pluses were that moment of time alone with me and my cig (and usually a book). I got a lot of reading done. It was a nice barrier to put between myself and whatever was happening.  In fact, I resented it when family members or friends "came out with me" when I went for a smoke (no smoking indoors, I never smoked indoors, even in the winters of Indiana!), because this was my time.  

 

The minuses well outweighed the pluses.  It delayed our movies at home - I had to take smoke breaks whenever I felt "uncomfortable" or "fidgety" or "wanted a break." (this was around once an hour - I was a 15 cig a day smoker).  It interrupted everything - our trips through airports - I needed to go through security to go out and have a smoke (or, like in New Zealand, go into a cough-choke-cough smoking room).  Getting out of a car and going into a shopping center, I would pause for a smoke (it was like giving me the courage to go in the shopping center!).  Getting out of the shopping center I would stop to smoke before getting in the car.  It stank up the car.  It stank up my clothes and hair (though I didn't know it at the time, I now smell it on others).  It stained my fingers yellow, and I got those little creases around my lips that "looked like a smoker."

 

And I was dying.  I could do no cardio.  I would have brown outs, nearly faint, head pounding, lungs screaming for air.  (statins and lithium contributed to this, too)

 

So I took those last 200 cigarettes mindfully.  I thought about the indigenous Americans' relationship to tobacco - how it was the smoke that connected earth and sky, connected human and God, connected human and plant/animal peoples.  Mindfully, I smoked 200 cigarettes.

 

When I got down to about 10, I saw there was a hypnotist at my doctor's office.  I thought - what the heck - for an extra bang - I'm gonna do this anyway, why not get hypnotised?  So I did.  She gave me a CD to play, and I listened to it every night:  Smoke Free.  I still play the music track sometimes.  But after the first session she became uneasy.  I did not go into full trance, but went into a light shamanic trance that I use in my own work.  That made her uneasy, and then when she saw the "bipolar" thing, she practically shoved me out the door and would not hypnotise me again.  By the second session, I had smoked my last cigarette anyway.

 

Here was the deal.  I was allowed to smoke cigarettes if I wanted.  BUT I WAS NOT ALLOWED TO ***BUY*** ANY!  So if I had the gumption to go up to a stranger (or friend) and bum a cigarette, I could. 

 

But - like with tapering - as my daily cigs went down (I wasn't counting - I just knew I only had 5 packs left, then 2 packs, then 10 cigs left.  I made 14 days of cigs last a month.  The last day I smoked 2 cigs.) I started feeling better.  I still had cardio problems (statins and lithium) but I didn't brown out anymore.  My head was clearer.  I wasn't choking at night - so by the time I got to "no cigarettes," I didn't really want them anymore.

 

That was my method.  That was before e-cigs were invented (they are quite illegal here, anyway - well, you can get them, but you have to jump through hoops to get nicotine based cartridges).  

 

I think it was important to "say goodbye" to cigarettes as they were an anxiety protection, a barrier, a wall for me, as well as a sensual experience.  I enjoyed smoking (until it became too much).

 

For Christmas, I announced my "present" to my husband (I had told nobody while I was going through the process - by keeping it secret, I felt like I gave it more power, and less "holes" in it for failure).  I told him my present was not the giving of a thing, but the absence of a thing.  It took him a few hours to figure it out!

 

I have smoked a few herbal cigs since then (yuck).  I might have even had one tobacco cigarette - but it was so unremarkable I cannot remember for sure.  But I have not wanted to go back.  

 

And - as I realized that, while I felt better - I was *not* better, I started looking at other things.  Like the PPI's, statins, and psych drugs. 

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Shoulditakethis

Hello,

 

I've been on nortriptyline, 10 mg a night for 1 month for migraines. I can't stand the side effects and would like to start tapering ASAP. The problem is that I recently started using e-cigs again. I had quit for five months but relapsed under extreme stress when my girlfriend broke up with me.

 

I want to quit the e-cigs cold turkey, but also want to start my taper immediately. Is it unwise to go cold turkey now and start my taper?

 

Or should I wait out the taper than go about quitting. I've done it once and can do it again. I really hate vaping and hate nortriptyline even more, I don't want to be on or addicted to anything right now.

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Petunia

Its best to taper/quit one drug at a time.

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legan

Hi

 

Any body knows how smoking ciggarete affact tge withdrawal .

 

Do you advice quit smoking ?

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GirlfromD

Hi i'm new here, what an helpful site!

 

I am currently going through withdrawal, and it's awful, just plain awful. I'm a smoker, and smoking has previously helped me to calm down when I was stressed out or needed to relax, but at the moment i feel like puking everytime i want a cigarette.

 

So i was wondering, has anyone else in here experienced this too? I tried to quit, cause i know smoking is bad, but at the moment it is very hard to quit with the withdrawal and everything going on.

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