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nz11

☼ nz11 climbs onboard

764 posts in this topic

Thanks for popping in Cicci, and for the 'like'

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http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/3905-ibid-prozac-stopped-doing-it/?p=213214

 

Just getting ready for next month :

 

.... if you are getting an earache from listening to Republicans you could always switch to listening to the wonderful soothing sound of Democrats and the voice of your next President ..Clinton!

 

nz11

If i was American id be a Democrat.

 

Funny, I haven't contributed to SA for a while, but here it is around midnight and I decide to check in. And when I go to New Content, what is the absolute first post I find but something you sent to me a few months ago. Good to see your posts, recycled, original, or whatever. 

 

I must tell you that I'm so frightened and anxious (that's just me, I'm afraid) of the election that I've resorted to sleep meds again. And to thoughts of death. Add destruction of my hard-earned mental health to you-know-who's raping our hard-won civilization (emphasis on civil), such as it is. I think I now understand what it must have felt like to be a humanely-inclined German around 1930 or 1935. I understand New Zealand is lovely in November. Sorry to meander off-topic. 

 

Peace to all SAers. And to all of good will. Sorry I haven't kept up.

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Thanks for popping in to my intro ibid.

Yeah i had to google to find that post and it was in your intro.

I noticed you hadnt updated for a bit. Nice to hear from you. Sorry you are taking meds for sleep ...Come on this is going to be a wonderful time for America ...its your first woman president. Awesome.

 

If Hillary pushes for no fly zones and it starts WW3 i'm finding the GPS coordinates of the Brassmonkey trench and im hunkering down there cos i think its gonna be a winner.

 

My favourite month is february in NZ.

But November will be good to cos thats when Classy Hillary will be running the show for you guys.

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AW NZ forward facing with such courage! Congratulations on your anniversary and your new job! 6 years is a long time and I can't say I read every word since my last post here but I read most of it... my eyes are not up to it all.  I would like to say your not the only one who has had medical records fudged and I think it may be part of the master plan in how to deal with trouble makers as it has happened to me in the past and is occurring again this very day.  I am tempted to do what I did not do in the past and let if fall where it may at the same time I have already mostly worded my response itemised to the inaccuracies and corrections ... so I guess some of us are just going to fight till the bitter end.  Though i have to say doings so has not proved to be fruitful in my experience. 

I wish you happiness and peace.... when you get your sea legs and get drop back in I hope to be better and catch up with you.  

Blessings 

peace to you

B

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Greetings btdt

Thanks for popping in.

Hope you are as well as can be in these iatrogenic harmed times.

 

Been reading Glenmullen thought i would share some.

Check out the next post.

Peace to you too...and dont forget to vote for Hillary.

nz11

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Excerpts from:

 

The Antidepressant Solution by Glenmullen 2005.

 

After the British and FDA warnings, in April 2004 the prestigious medical Journal the Lancet published a damning critique of Keller’s and a number of other similar antidepressant studies. In an accompanying editorial, the Lancet expressed outrage over Glaxo SmithKline internal memo and misleading academic reports. The Lancet described the “selective reporting of favourable research “ when side-effects as  serious as drug induced suicide are at stake as a “catastrophe” that “should be unimaginable.” The Lancet called the false reassurances of the pharmaceutical industry and academic psychiatrists who work closely with the industry “an abuse of the trust patients place in their physicians.” Calling the burgeoning antidepressant scandal a disaster, the Lancet called for legal powers to force pharmaceutical companies to make unpublished data public.

 

The FDA’s investigation of the antidepressant scandal is a conflict of interest since the agency’s own reputation is at stake for having approved the drugs in the first place and having swept under the carpet repeated reports of the side-effects including antidepressant induced suicidality for over a decade.

 

The problem is compounded by the fact that nowadays 70% of prescriptions for antidepressants are written by family doctors, many of whom do not know how to taper patients off the drugs.

 

With so many people using the drugs, withdrawal and dependence have become major problems.

 

Research has shown that when patients stop antidepressants cold turkey they can have high rates of withdrawal reactions, which vary depending on the particular drug. In studies involving hundreds of patients, 66% of patients stopping Paxil, 60% of patients stopping Zoloft, and 78% of patients stopping effexor have withdrawal reactions.

 

Ch1

Countless patients are caught in the antidepressant catch 22; restarting antidepressants or putting the dose back up thinking they are treating depression when in fact they have become dependent on the drugs to suppress withdrawal reactions…..

 

With 20 million people on the drugs one can reasonably estimate that millions of people may be trapped in this dilemma…..

 

In many instances not only is the drug restarted, the dose is increased and additional drugs – additional antidepressants, lithium, anticonvulsants, thyroid hormone, Ritalin, and other stimulants are added to treat withdrawal that has been mistaken for a depressive relapse.

 

In the process patients get the false impression that the psychiatric conditions and prognoses are far worse than they actually are. For patients trapped in this dilemma, the result is profound human suffering with broad social ramifications.

 

Alternating days on and days off is no way to taper an antidepressant.

 

In 1997 study published in the Journal of clinical psychiatry found that 70% of family doctors are not aware of antidepressant withdrawal… Many family doctors do not know how severe antidepressant withdrawal can be and how slowly some patients need to taper off the drugs.

 

Withdrawal can be a life-threatening emergency.

 

Antidepressant withdrawal and dependence can occur in patients on very low doses, even doses below the minimum recommended by pharmaceutical companies. There are published reports of patients who simply could not get off their antidepressants because withdrawal reactions were so severe.

 

Anyone who has been on an antidepressant for more than about a month can experience with withdrawal symptoms and dependence if the drug is stopped abruptly….. No one can predict in advance which patients will have the most severe withdrawal reactions so all patients need to cautiously taper off the drugs.

 

The FDA’s March 2004  warning that antidepressant withdrawal reactions may make patients suicidal applies to all 11 of these antidepressants- Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Celexa, Lexapro, Luvox, Effexor, Cymbalta, serzone, Remeron and Wellbutrin.

When patients switch from one SSRI or SNRi to another antidepressant in the same class, they may not experience withdrawal symptoms. The new antidepressant may protect against withdrawal from the old one because they are in the same class. However, this is not the case if one switches to an antidepressant in  a different class.

 

Ch2

The pharmaceutical industry has drummed into doctors and patients the idea that today’s bestselling antidepressants are not addicting, according to the technical, medical definition of the term.

 

I began to realize that even according to the technical, medical definition, antidepressants can be addicting. That is, patients can crave them when in withdrawal, can use escalating doses, and in some instances can even abuse them to get high. Still more importantly, the technical, medical definition is not what matters when it comes to advertising and marketing direct to the patients.

 

What matters is the plain English definition of addiction when speaking to patients.

 

Oxford English dictionary states that addiction is ‘having a compulsion to take a drug the stopping of which produces withdrawal symptoms.’ Withdrawal symptoms are precisely what afflict countless patients who tried to stop antidepressants.

 

Over the past decade, pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrists who are strong drug proponents have adamantly  denied that antidepressants are addicting or habit-forming.

 

As antidepressant withdrawal began to come to the attention of doctors and patients in the mid-1990s, Eli Lilly the manufacturer of Prozac, paid for a group of psychiatric experts – in this case psychiatrists who are strong drug proponents and often consult or do research for pharmaceutical companies – to meet in Phoenix Arizona to discuss the growing concern about this side-effect.

 

One of the main outcomes of the meeting was the decision that the term 'withdrawal' should not be used for antidepressants. Instead the group proposed a euphemism “antidepressant discontinuation syndrome” to replace the term ‘ addiction.’

 

After the meeting, Lilly provided financial assistance for the group of experts, many of them prominent academic psychiatrists, to publish eight papers on the antidepressant discontinuation syndrome.

 

In fact, the eight papers were bound and mailed free of charge, to doctors across the country to help establish the term.

 

For years the pharmaceutical industry has hidden behind the term to claim that antidepressants do not even cause symptoms of withdrawal, let alone addiction.

 

This kind of industry spin control is part of why patients and doctors have had so much difficulty getting honest, reliable information about antidepressant withdrawal, dependence, and addiction.

 

 

Ch3

Case studies:

Notice a common theme in Diana’s, Stevens, and Johns cases: antidepressant withdrawal reactions cause considerable pain and suffering for many patients.

 

Like most patients Diana, Steven, and John were not warned about antidepressant withdrawal reactions let alone told how severe the reactions and the consequences can be.

 

The dreams are often frightening ones involving harm to oneself or harm to others.

 

In March 2004, the FDA issued its warning that adult and paediatric patients may become suicidal when they decrease the dose of the antidepressants while tapering off the drugs.

 

Withdrawal induced dizziness can have a profound effect on patients day-to-day lives, making it difficult to do everything from driving a car to walking around.

If the dizziness is severe, the only way to relieve it may be sitting or lying still.

 

These common, but at times quite distressing, medical symptoms of antidepressant withdrawal include drooling because of excessive saliva, difficulty speaking clearly because of slurred speech, chest pain, muscle twitching or spasms, muscle cramps or stiffness, restless legs, and uncontrollable twitching of the mouth.

 

To prevent these unnecessary, wasteful scenarios that take a heavy toll on patients and the healthcare system, doctors need to be well informed about how to diagnose and manage antidepressant withdrawal reactions.

                                                         

Ch4

The failure of Karen’s psychiatrist in San Francisco to consider that the drugs might be the problem is a disturbing phenomenon.

Over and over again in some of the most tragic cases, doctors who did not recognise the side-effect [antidepressant induced suicidality] have relentlessly increased the dose as the patient got worse and worse.

 

The term “anxiety” refers to the psychological state of being anxious, tense, fearful, or worried.

 

The term “panic attack” refers to the physical symptoms that can accompany severe anxiety: racing heart, shortness of breath, chest pain, feeling faint, hot flushes, sweating, trembling, tingling sensations, and the fear that one is losing one’s mind or dying.

 

Akathisia is a well-established side-effect of SSRIs

 

The DSM states, “serotonin specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressant medication may produce akathisia.”

Moreover, the DSM spells out the connection between the side-effect and suicide and violence; “the subject of distress resulting from akathisia is significant… Akathisia may be associated with dysphoria [distress], irritability, aggression, or suicide attempts.”

[This book was written in 2005 so Glenmullen must be referring to the DSM-IV]

 

Unfortunately most primary care doctors who write the vast majority of prescriptions for antidepressants, are unaware the drugs can cause akathisia and then akathisia may in turn cause suicide and violence. Even many psychiatrists are unaware of this crucial link between antidepressants, suicide, and violence.

 

Writing in medical journals, experts describe akathisia as “more difficult to than any of the symptoms for which they [patients] had been originally treated.”

 

Akathisia can be extremely dangerous, especially in patients who have not been warned about the side-effect and mistake it for a worsening of this psychiatric condition.

 

Akathisia can trigger panic reactions in patients, increased paranoia, and drive patients to suicide and violence. Suicide impulses can arise because of an obsessive preoccupation with suicide induced by akathisia.

 

Some patients report that they become suicidal because death offers a welcome relief from the otherwise inescapable physical and psychological torment of akathisia.

 

Patients describe suicidal urges as alien, intrusive, and completely out of character. Violent attacks or homicides can arise because of heightened paranoia, irritability, and rage reactions. The suicidal and homicidal impulses are closely related manifestations of the same underlying agitation, impulsivity, and disinhibition caused by akathisia.

 

Mania and hypomania are controversial side-effects of antidepressants.

 

Mania is a severe psychiatric condition consisting of an elevated, or high, mood it can include grandiosity, rapid speech, racing thoughts, irritability, distractibility, agitation, insomnia, reckless behaviour (e.g. buying sprees or sexual indiscretions), delusions, and hallucinations.

 

Hypomania is a milder version of mania. This relatively new psychiatric diagnosis became officially established only in the mid-1990s. At the time mania was officially renamed bipolar I  so that hypomania could be named bipolar II.

 

Antidepressants can certainly make patients look manic or hypomanic. But the American APA DSM explicitly states that “manic like [or hypomanic –like] episodes that are clearly caused by somatic antidepressant treatment (e.g. medication) should not count toward a diagnosis of bipolar I or bipolar II disorder because these are drug induced states.

 

But pharmaceutical companies and psychiatrists who are zealous drug proponents have misled countless patients and doctors to believe the antidepressant induced manic -like states indicate the patient has an underlying bipolar illness that was merely brought out or triggered by the drug.

 

The DSM also states clearly that “no laboratory findings [that is tests] that are diagnostic of a manic episode have been identified.” In other words, there is no blood test, x-ray, brain scan, or any other test to objectively definitively diagnose someone with a bipolar disorder. Instead, bipolar disorder is a diagnosis made on the basis of the patient’s behaviour and mental state.

 

If a patient who is not on any drugs becomes manic, then one can reasonably conclude that the patient has bipolar disorder. But, if the manic -like state is caused by an antidepressant, this is a drug induced state, which, although it may mimic bipolar disorder is not actually bipolar disorder, as explicitly stated by the DSM, psychiatry’s official diagnostic manual.

 

In recent years, the pharmaceutical industry has inundated doctors with “educational” material on “bipolar depression,” promoting the idea that depressed patients who became anxious, agitated, and sleepless on antidepressants, are bipolar: bipolar II if the patients ”just” become anxious, agitated and sleepless; Bipolar I if they become paranoid reckless or psychotic.

Bipolar I or bipolar II doesn’t matter, the “treatment” is more drugs, powerful antimanic agents.

 

Psychiatric diagnosis are subject to manipulation because there are no objective medical tests by which to diagnose any psychiatric condition.

 

The subjectivity of the psychiatric diagnosis makes them vulnerable to commercial exploitation.

 

When people take so much cocaine that they have manic -like reactions and end up in the emergency room, they diagnosed with cocaine toxicity.

 

When people have manic like reactions to steroids, they are diagnosed with steroid toxicity.

 

Yet when people have the same type of reactions to antidepressants, they are misdiagnosed with so-called “underlying bipolar disorder.” The practice protects antidepressants and promotes antimanic agents, which have become multibillion-dollar a year drugs.

 

Ch5

“I was angry that my family doctor hadn’t warned me about withdrawal and that the doctors in the emergency room hadnt thought of it,” says Allison I felt so odd educating my doctor about this, isn’t it supposed to be the other way round.

 

 

Patients who have been on antidepressants less than a month typically do not experience withdrawal reactions of they stop the drug.

[imo I don’t think this is correct, in fact Healy has shown only two weeks exposure can leave healthy people with symptoms for months-nz11].

 

When patients take the last dose of an antidepressant, the drug does not simply disappear immediately from the body. Since patients have typically taken antidepressants for months or years, the drugs are distributed throughout the brain and the rest of the body.

 

Antidepressants affect other brain chemicals directly and indirectly to varying degrees. Paxil in particular blocks a group of receptors in the nervous system known as cholinergic receptors, producing what are called anticholinergic side-effects. When Paxil is stopped, reversal of these effects produces a condition known as “cholinergic rebound” which may exacerbate Paxil withdrawal. A number of experts believe this is still another reason why Paxil is one of the worst offenders: because of the particular constellation of brain chemicals that it affects.

 

Ch6

 Question: Can antidepressant withdrawal symptoms do any entry to the brain or to other organ systems?

Answer:

 We assume that withdrawal symptoms do not cause injury to brain cells or to other organ systems. But, since it has not been adequately research, we do not really know the answer to this question. The question is often asked by patients with severe symptoms like the electric ZAP sensations electric or zap sensations in their brains or disabling  withdrawal symptoms.

 

Because we lack a definitive answer, patients should be discouraged from repeatedly “toughing out” severe withdrawal symptoms.

 

Instead the tapering schedule should be paced so that patients experience mild, tolerable withdrawal symptoms. This provides something of an “insurance policy” since we do not really know the answer to this important question.

 

Switching antidepressants is not a good strategy

 

Ch7

Taking antidepressants for years, even decades, is an ongoing human experiment, which should not be taken lightly.

 

Ch9

 

Notice that once patients have been on antidepressants for more than a month, there is no correlation between how long patients have been on antidepressants and how severe the withdrawal reactions are.

[This is a thought provoker- i wonder what implications this has for the one month-ers for tapering hmmm...].

 

.................................//.....................................

Thats all for today

 

nz11

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Read about Hillary and the pharmaceutical companies. That woman and her followers are absolutely disgusting anw will sell their soul for power and personal gain. Don't be fooled by the lies you are told by the media.

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Thanks DLB gee .....ok i vote Peter Breggin for President.

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Talking about the wonderful Peter Breggin

 

I read this from an inside story from the successful recent lawsuit....

 

In my direct examination, I testified that restarting the patient on his regular dose of Paxil 30 mg, despite a hiatus of at least four days without the medication, was a direct cause of the suicide later on the same day. Restarting him on Paxil 30 mg, when most of the drug was out of his system, caused akathisia (agitation with hyperactivity) and suicide. I also found that the doctor and the psychologist were negligent in several other ways, including their failure to evaluate the patient and to order careful monitoring.

 

Taken from Breggin talking about the insdie story to a 11.9 million law suit.

 

It appears after 6 yrs use this person was CT off 30mg of paxil and 100mg of trazodone and  then 4 days later original doses  reinstated. 

He committed suicide.

 

Following his first morning dose of the Paxil, Mr. Barbaros was seen for a routine evaluation by a staff psychologist in the mid-afternoon. At this point, Mr. Barbaros was drastically changed.

 

He was no longer a man who conversed easily and showed no signs of significant stress, anxiety or depression. According to the psychologist’s deposition, Mr. Barbaros now looked extremely anxious and like a “cornered rat,” spoke very little, made poor eye contact, and looked hunched over and withdrawn. In the psychologist’s scantily written report, his only diagnosis was “rule out depression,” an entirely new diagnosis for Mr. Barbaros.

 

I attributed these drastic changes in Mr. Barbaros’ condition to the impact of the large dose of Paxil. The psychologist had not checked to see what medications Mr. Barbaros was taking. He did not check the medical record and therefore did not know that his current severely anxious and withdrawn state was entirely new for him during his incarceration.  He did not ask his patient if he was suicidal.

 

....................//...........

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"I testified that the psychiatrist's actions were worse than practicing medicine negligently—he was not practicing medicine at all. He was more like a vending machine."

Breggin.

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At a first glance at the above situation- 4 days out from a CT, appears to have a simple solution go back to the original dose.

But on doing so this person then committed suicide.

 

But here's the thing Breggin discovered this person had had an adverse reaction to the drug on the very first exposure to it...6 yrs ago.

 

Question: Does this mean that one should, when presented with a person who has CT only a couple of days ago, ask them what was their experience on first exposure to the drug , do you recall any health issues when the drug was first administered.

 

I actually find this rather scary stuff ...

 

Here is Breggins testimony:

 

One of the more dramatic moments in my testimony came on the first series of questions during cross-examination. When I began reviewing the case, I was asked to focus on Mr. Barbaros’ medical record going back approximately six years to the time when his primary care doctor had started him on Paxil 10 mg, apparently without difficulty, and then raised it gradually to 20 mg and then 30 mg. To be thorough, I examined all the remaining extensive medical records and came upon something remarkable buried within them that had previously escaped attention.

 

The day after his first dose of Paxil 10 mg, Mr. Barbaros became so anxious that he thought he was having a heart attack and sought immediate help at a local medical clinic separate from his primary care physician who prescribed the Paxil. That clinic referred him to a cardiologist on an emergency basis who evaluated him and found no physical disorder. These doctors treated Mr. Barbaros’ anxiety with prescriptions for a benzodiazepine tranquilizer.

 

Mr. Barbaros had experienced a very severe anxiety reaction to his first dose of Paxil, but it apparently never entered his mind that Paxil was causing it. From the medical record, it looks like he never told the emergency clinic or the cardiologist he had recently started taking Paxil and he never told his primary care doctor, when he returned for follow up later on, that he had been so anxious that he went to a cardiologist and received sedative tranquilizers. It is very common for individuals to fail to realize that their acute psychiatric emergencies are being caused by their psychiatric medication.  I call this phenomenon “medication spellbinding” or intoxication anosognosia.

 

As a medical expert in a product liability case against GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of Paxil, I had discovered from the company’s secret files that Paxil frequently caused severe psychiatric adverse reactions during the first few doses. I had published an article about this in the hope of alerting people to the risk. This earlier work of mine enhanced the credibility of my discussion.

 

So… when I was asked at the beginning of cross-examination to explain why Mr. Barbaros would have such a bad reaction to being restarted on Paxil since he never had a bad reaction to being started many years earlier, I had an unexpected answer. I could reply and document from the medical records that, in fact, he had a drastic psychiatric reaction to the original 10 mg dose but no one recognized that it was related to the Paxil. The defense attorney was so flummoxed by my revelation that he never even asked to see the relevant medical records. The cross-examination then went on for an unexpectedly long time, requiring me to come back a second day. The defense probably was hoping that the jury would forget the revelation I had disclosed in the first few minutes.

 

.......................//...........................

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All I can say is WOW . How are we as human beings still been feed lies by the so called experts, I will never trust a Dr again. And it scares me to think that if I never got to SA I would now be on tons of ADs by now

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Hi doggiemama nice of you to comment in my intro.

Yes i dont think i could have survived 3 years of daily neurological terror if i didnt have an informed group such as this to help me realize he humiliating obvious.

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Hi doggiemama nice of you to comment in my intro.

Yes i dont think i could have survived 3 years of daily neurological terror if i didnt have an informed group such as this to help me realize he humiliating obvious.

 

Great thread, glad you are making good progress.

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Wow, nz11, just wanted to stop by and say thanks for all the info you've collated here… complete horror show but needed to read it. 

I was put on prozac in 2002, I was at university and had really bad acne which got me down and made me not want to go out (pretty average response to it I would've thought!) 

I started getting suicidal ideation pretty soon after and self-harming, but never thought it due to the medication (medication spellbinding right there I guess). I still get upset about my scars which I can't do anything about, but I have to keep reminding myself it could've been a lot lot worse - all those people who killed others/themselves because of this evil stuff. There needs to be a special hell for these drug companies. It's bad. 

Edited by ChessieCat
Reworded obscenties

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I see you're about as far away from the shaking as one can get in NZ, but wanted to check up on you anyway. How's by you?

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Thanks dowdaller and keepinghope. Thanks for the kind words.

 

Yes all is well i dont live in earthquake land so im fine.

Im doing ok Brassmonkey. I'm very busy these days. Now completed 5 weeks of fulltime work and heres the thing that outrages me i wouldnt  have  been capable of doing it any sooner.

But im holding up and turning up and doing an ok job so thats something considering i was basically renedered iatrogenically unemployable for almost 7 years.

 

nz11

Wonder how 'That Wall' is going ....

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In my mind, sometimes I have Pink Floyd on repeat.

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Already down to a partial fence from what I'm hearing. Wasn't even possible in the first place.

 

Glad to hear that the job is going well, you're making some great progress.  Keep it up, one brick at a time. LOL

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waving hi to nz11

 

oh great, guys, now i got an ear worm

 

 

we don't need no education....

 

er no, that part is wrong!! we DO need an education!

we DON'T need a flippin wall

:P

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1479194746710.jpg

 

oh boy another earthquake image!!!

Talk about being in the right place at the right/wrong  time....

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Can't be NZ - we only have sheep here :)

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Oh , I saw this on the news and felt so bad for them but was glad to hear they were rescued.

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Thanks catnapt for helping me decode SWs post ...now i remember that song.

Karen yes there are cattle as well in nz.

Dont worry direstraits the farmer promised after they got rescued he would not be sending them to the slaughter house. Hows that for doubley lucky.

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yay!!

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Awww! So cute. Glad they are going to be okay.

 

Those cattle are like us in a way: After getting through this, we can handle anything! ! !  :lol:

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At a first glance at the above situation- 4 days out from a CT, appears to have a simple solution go back to the original dose.

But on doing so this person then committed suicide.

 

But here's the thing Breggin discovered this person had had an adverse reaction to the drug on the very first exposure to it...6 yrs ago.

 

Question: Does this mean that one should, when presented with a person who has CT only a couple of days ago, ask them what was their experience on first exposure to the drug , do you recall any health issues when the drug was first administered.

 

I actually find this rather scary stuff ...

 

Here is Breggins testimony:

 

One of the more dramatic moments in my testimony came on the first series of questions during cross-examination. When I began reviewing the case, I was asked to focus on Mr. Barbaros’ medical record going back approximately six years to the time when his primary care doctor had started him on Paxil 10 mg, apparently without difficulty, and then raised it gradually to 20 mg and then 30 mg. To be thorough, I examined all the remaining extensive medical records and came upon something remarkable buried within them that had previously escaped attention.

 

The day after his first dose of Paxil 10 mg, Mr. Barbaros became so anxious that he thought he was having a heart attack and sought immediate help at a local medical clinic separate from his primary care physician who prescribed the Paxil. That clinic referred him to a cardiologist on an emergency basis who evaluated him and found no physical disorder. These doctors treated Mr. Barbaros’ anxiety with prescriptions for a benzodiazepine tranquilizer.

 

Mr. Barbaros had experienced a very severe anxiety reaction to his first dose of Paxil, but it apparently never entered his mind that Paxil was causing it. From the medical record, it looks like he never told the emergency clinic or the cardiologist he had recently started taking Paxil and he never told his primary care doctor, when he returned for follow up later on, that he had been so anxious that he went to a cardiologist and received sedative tranquilizers. It is very common for individuals to fail to realize that their acute psychiatric emergencies are being caused by their psychiatric medication.  I call this phenomenon “medication spellbinding” or intoxication anosognosia.

 

As a medical expert in a product liability case against GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of Paxil, I had discovered from the company’s secret files that Paxil frequently caused severe psychiatric adverse reactions during the first few doses. I had published an article about this in the hope of alerting people to the risk. This earlier work of mine enhanced the credibility of my discussion.

 

So… when I was asked at the beginning of cross-examination to explain why Mr. Barbaros would have such a bad reaction to being restarted on Paxil since he never had a bad reaction to being started many years earlier, I had an unexpected answer. I could reply and document from the medical records that, in fact, he had a drastic psychiatric reaction to the original 10 mg dose but no one recognized that it was related to the Paxil. The defense attorney was so flummoxed by my revelation that he never even asked to see the relevant medical records. The cross-examination then went on for an unexpectedly long time, requiring me to come back a second day. The defense probably was hoping that the jury would forget the revelation I had disclosed in the first few minutes.

 

.......................//...........................

I am so far behind sorry.... records are so shabby these days I doubt he would have found it... or they are here at least for me to find any medical record without at least one mistake is rare.... 

wanted to say Hi but tired myself out or ruined my resolve reading the post prior to this one I will be back....

 

Great that your doing so good with your job way to Go :) !

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Wow, that is exactly what happened to me after taking 10 mg. paxil for the first time and reinstating all the other times when I tried to get off too quickly. Of course my body and mind were already completely fried that first time in 03 due to the fluoroquinolone that caused me to go on the paxil poison in the first place. What a mess I was.....

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Thanks btdt

 

DLB you are not alone.

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Was reading some of Healy's writings and thought i would post an excerpt:

...........................................................

While Shipman’s killing spree with opiods was unfolding, North America was sinking into a prescribed opioid epidemic that now accounts for 100 deaths per day, over 30,000 per year, over half a million since the epidemic began, perhaps the single greatest cause of death in America today.

 

The way in to the epidemic was laid during the 1980s with the marketing of Oxycontin by Purdue Pharma, supported by Abbott, and later Janssen pushing Fentanyl. There was an astute marketing of an idea – that people with real pain do not become addicted to opioids – a myth equivalent to the myth of lowered serotonin in depression. This was allied to new standards of care for pain management which hinged on RCTs, all of which demonstrated that opioids were effective – again exactly the same dynamic exploited by companies marketing SSRIs. The result was mass prescription of opioids by doctors, many whom felt trapped between clinical wisdom and the risk of being sued. But clinical wisdom never makes it into guidelines or standards of care, and since standards of care emerged in the 1980s managers sack doctors who don’t stick to the guidelines – or refer them to their registration body.

 

Prescription-only status is another part of the regulatory apparatus. It was introduced in America in 1914 in response to escalating concerns about one of the first opioids – heroin.

 

Purdue’s marketing of Oxycontin exploited this deftly. Companies and doctors were in the clear provided all prescriptions were for physical conditions causing pain. Patients and doctors on cue, to a background tune being piped by Purdue and Janssen, engaged in a dance about the management of pain. There were no problems for doctors prescribing for pain but if they had been prescribing the same drugs for addiction they would have been struck off.

 

Faced with the horrific consequences of this dance, FDA intervened in extraordinary fashion two years ago. In 2014, a century after the introduction of prescription-only status, FDA made a potent opioid, naloxone, available over the counter in US States who were willing to endorse this option. Given intravenously or nasally, naloxone can save lives by reversing the effects of an overdose by other opioids.

 

To murder is human. To mass murder needs a regulatory apparatus. We have no problem viewing Shipman as a murderer. But what about Purdue or Janssen? And what about the role of regulators from FDA to the GMC?

..........................................

 

nz11

And what about GSK?

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I have made a small change to THE WORKS tapering calculator.

 

1. The Liquid taper schedule now goes to 2 decimal places rather than 1 decimal place as before.

I overlooked the fact that calibration on a  1 ml syringe is capable of 2 decimal places.

 

2. A red flag 'STOP check' now appears for anyone who tries to tell the calculator the pill weight is equal to or less than the active ingredient weight.

 

Happy New Year

 

nz11

'THE WORKS' 1 Jan 17 for sa.zip

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Recently learned something new:

The editing window is only 60 mins however any past attachments can be deleted at any time just go to settings and then manage my attachments.

A clever member of this site told me about this little tip of the year.

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Happy New Year , NZ. You bring something special to S A. We are lucky to have you here. Thank You. Wishing you the best  - love and light and healing !   :)

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And yet Prozac worked for me for a long time. Worked for my financial advisor for decades too, until it recently pooped out for him. Don't know what to say

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A few years ago, I broke my leg and was given percoset for pain. Had morphine in hospital. The rehab people in the rehab center took me off it gradually and I had no problem.

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