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Cymbalta Withdrawal Lawsuits Progressing in US

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NOTE Also see
 

2009: FDA hears testimony about Cymbalta discontinuation syndrome

 

Study finds some Cymbalta withdrawal "severe and persistant"
 
Doctor is shocked at severe Cymbalta withdrawal symptoms
 
Tips for tapering off Cymbalta (duloxetine)

 



This is a press release seeking leads for lawyers http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1532756
 
To send an inquiry, see http://injury-law.freeadvice.com/injury-law/drug-toxic_chemicals/cymbalta-lawsuits.htm
 
It is not clear what firm, if any, is pursuing these lawsuits.
 
Patients Suffering Withdrawal Symptoms from Major Antidepressant Drug Suspect Manufacturer Hid Risk of Side Effect
 
Consumers who have suffered from withdrawal of Eli Lilly & Company's anti-depressant Cymbalta have reason to believe the drug manufacturer was aware of the risk of side effects but failed to disclose information to the general public.
 
SAUSALITO, CA, October 18, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Patients using the anti-depressant drug, Cymbalta, have reported a number of physical and emotional side effects suffered after attempting to stop use of the drug. The drug's manufacturer, Eli Lilly & Company, has come under fire for failing to disclose the risks of Cymbalta withdrawal and promoting use of the drug while downplaying its side effects.
 
Free Advice has released new articles covering Cymbalta withdrawal to provide consumers with more information on what symptoms to expect and how injured patients can pursue legal action.
 
FDA Finds Evidence of Cymbalta Side Effects The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has investigated Cymbalta withdrawal symptoms, and released the results of an agency study that found:

 

- Clinical studies of abrupt discontinuation of Cymbalta show that withdrawal occurred in 44 to 50% of patients

- Of patients suffering withdrawal symptoms, 10% of those were severe

- Half of the patients who reported Cymbalta withdrawal had not resolved the side effects at the end of the two week study

Patients in the FDA study displayed a wide array of physical and emotional side effects as a result of abrupt discontinuation of Cymbalta use, including:
 
- Suicidal thoughts
- Tremors
- Nausea
- Appetite changes and weight gain
- Insomnia
- Full body shaking
- Tunnel vision
 
The FDA's study also pointed out that there had been "a serious breakdown at both the FDA and the manufacturer, Eli Lilly and Company, in providing adequate warnings and instructions about how to manage [the side effects]," which suggests that Eli Lilly was aware of the potential side effects from Cymbalta withdrawal and provided neither the FDA nor the American public with adequate warning of the risks.
....
 
Eli Lilly's History of Misleading Cymbalta Advertisements According to patients who have suffered Cymbalta withdrawal, Eli Lilly mislead consumers with a series of aggressive advertisements that highlighted the positive effects of Cymbalta and downplayed, or ignored, the potential risks of withdrawal side effects. As more patients come forward with complaints of withdrawal symptoms, Eli Lilly's recent history of unlawful promotion of the drug could suggest the company was aware of Cymbalta's risks and failed to disclose them to consumers.
 
Eli Lilly was fined in 2007 and 2009 by the FDA for unlawfully promoting Cymbalta through mailings that gave false statements that overstated the effect of the drug and downplaying clinical studies that revealed risks of Cymbalta withdrawal. Further, the company has been accused of selectively publishing study results that over-exaggerate the effect of Cymbalta and hide the risks.
 
Misleading Claims About Cymbalta Side Effects Could Lead to Lawsuits Citing the history of Eli Lilly's fines by the FDA and the suspicion that the company provided misleading study results, patients claim that the company has established a pattern of falsified advertising to press Cymbalta on patients without adequate warning of the risks. Attorneys preparing legal action against the company claim that Eli Lilly was aware of the moderate to severe side effects associated with Cymbalta withdrawal, promoted use of the drug without warning of these risks, and caused patients who used the drug unaware of the consequences significant injury. By arguing that Eli Lilly Company was aware of Cymbalta side effects and downplayed them to promote use of the drug, patients and their attorneys will look to hold the drug manufacturer liable for medical bills and pain & suffering damages. For more information, click here for Free Advice's latest article about Cymbalta lawsuits.
 
As more patients come forward, experienced lawyers are offering consultations with people who have suffered moderate to severe side effects from Cymbalta withdrawal. Typical symptoms last for several weeks after ceasing the use of Cymbalta, or are so severe as to prevent the patient from being able to stop use of the drug. If you or a loved one has suffered from Cymbalta withdrawal, click here for a FREE case evaluation by an experienced attorney. --- Press release service and press release distribution provided by http://www.24-7pressrelease.com

Edited by Altostrata
added note

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There has to be some known addictive substance being put into these medications, no?

Just like big tobacco and the nicotine. Creating customers for life!

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Thank you Alto.

My mom is on Cymbalta and experienced DS after missing one dose. Well duh - 

 

Unfortunately some people can't believe it until they experience DS...and they switch teams and are astonished. 

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"Fortunately, for such persons seeking compensation, pediatricians are aware of the signs of a newborn with Effexor effects. Unfortunately, the situation creates a quagmire in choosing whether to wean off the expectant woman off the drug and or keep the expecting woman on the drug and face possible birth defects in the newborn in the near future."

 

this is as close as they get to saying withdrawal is a physical thing... detrimental to the developing fetus...

"create a non- conducive fetal environment that is hostile to the unborn child"

 

I guess if they spelled it out it would open a door for withdrawal damages in men and woman not fetuses. 

 

I am aware there are claims for all antidepressants in birth defects.  I am interested in an adult claim for side effects withdrawal and damages to the body. 

Much of what is in the current warning for effexor does not apply to me as it came out in 2004 I started effexor in 2000. The FDA has countless warning updates for this drug. 

I have not heard of legal cases in Canada not yet. 

Thanks for the link. 

peace

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To the mods, I am posting this here and in the media section hoping more people will see it.  I hope that is okay.

 

 

Current withdrawal lawsuit info for Cymbalta can be found here (includes link to legal website where you can apply to be part of class actions if they are in your area):

 

http://fiddaman.blogspot.ca/2014/08/eli-lilly-to-face-cymbalta-lawsuits.html

 

Here's a quote from the legal office that is taking some of the cases:

 

“We believe that Lilly’s warning that Cymbalta withdrawal occurs at a rate greater than or equal to 1% is deceptive.  It is just a sleight of hand.  One of Lilly’s own studies shows that over 50% of patients experience withdrawal when they stop Cymbalta.  1% is not 50%, not even close.  A drug label is not the place to play games with words.  It is a place to honestly inform doctors and patients about the benefits and risks of medicines so they can make informed choices.  Our clients feel strongly that they were betrayed by Lilly and we will do all we can to ensure their voices are heard by the courts.” - R. Brent Wisner, Baum, Hedlund, Aristei & Goldman, P.C

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One topic is fine -- keeps discussion in one place. Thanks, Unfolding.

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Eli Lilly & Co., the producer of the popular antidepressant Cymbalta (duloxetine), is facing a spate of litigation over injuries associated with the drug. Plaintiffs allege that Cymbalta can cause severe withdrawal symptoms, including dizziness, nausea, headache, fatigue, paresthesia, vomiting, irritability, nightmares, insomnia, diarrhea, anxiety, hyperhidrosis, and vertigo within 12 hours of missing a single dose. Over 28 lawsuits have now been filed before 22 district courts and 21 different judges. Attorneys for the plaintiffs have now asked the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) to consolidate these actions in a California federal court.

The petition filed with the JPML states that “it is likely that many hundreds of cases will be filed during the course of this litigation.” This expected amount of cases with similar facts and injuries generally warrant the creation of a Multidistrict Litigation (MDL) in order to increase the efficiency of pretrial proceedings. In an MDL, discovery and pretrial proceedings affect all cases in the MDL, leading to reduced costs for both parties, as well as consistent rulings from the Court.

Cymbalta was approved by the FDA in 2004 for the treatment of major depressive order. It was later approved in 2007 for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder, and in 2008, for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Eli Lilly has also been accused by Plaintiffs of marketing the drug with overstated efficacy rates and understated withdrawal effects.
 
In fact, Eli Lilly’s own clinical studies show that at least 44.3% of Cymbalta patients exhibited side effects when they stopped taking the drug. Despite this finding, the label for Cymbalta clearly states that these withdrawal symptoms are rare and only effect 1% of users. Plaintiffs also allege that Eli Lilly’s usage of the word “discontinuation” instead of “withdrawal” when describing the effects of withdrawal from Cymbalta shows the company’s gross understatement of the side effects of Cymbalta.
 
Effects of Withdrawal
The effects of Cymbalta withdrawal can be very painful and disturbing for many victims of the drug. Some patients describe “brain zaps” which literally feel like the brain has been shocked. This side effect is often accompanied by severe dizziness and is seemingly random. Others report suicidal ideation, insomnia, and painful headaches. The withdrawals can last for several months.

What could cause such atypical withdrawal effects? Well, Cymbalta is not a typical antidepressant. Many older antidepressants are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), like Prozac and Paxil. These drugs inhibit the reuptake of serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain which affects mood. SSRIs come with their own dangers and tolerability issues, but are older and better established. On the other hand, Cymbalta is in a class of drugs called selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) which are newer and less studied. Eli Lilly even admits (along with other SNRI manufacturers) that the precise mechanism of action for this class of drugs is not clear.

Cymbalta was only created after Eli Lilly’s patent on Prozac expired. Prozac has a very long half-life (the time it takes for the drug to be eliminated from the body) which Eli Lilly argued contributed to its low withdrawal rates. Cymbalta, on the other hand, is eliminated quickly from the body, which could be the cause of its more severe side effects from withdrawal.

Although these cases are still in the early stages of litigation, we do hope that the victims of this dangerous drug achieve the justice they deserve. Big pharmaceutical companies too often understate or downplay the risks of their drugs despite evidence to the contrary. Patients need to be informed of all of the risks before they put an unknown substance into their body.
 
-- a press report from attorneys at http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/cymbalta-withdrawal-cases-may-soon-have-05251/

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I hope this is successful and leads the way for all the others to be brought to justice too. 

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A similar group action regarding Paxil withdrawal was responsible for putting withdrawal warnings on all SSRIs.

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Effexor is a SNRI antidepressant too.

Do people heal from this evil drug...???

At almost 2 and a half years off, I have seen a lot of improvement, but still struggling with lingering issues like scary broken sleep,(not able to sleep even 2 hrs in a row) and bad premature ejaculation.

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I went through 2 weeks of horrible w/d from Cymbalta after only being ON it for 19 days.  A lot of GI problems and hypomania.  My GP thought I had gallstones. Nasty, nasty drug.

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Cymbalta, on the other hand, is eliminated quickly from the body, which could be the cause of its more severe side effects from withdrawal.

 

 

 

I'll testify to that. Wd symptoms (I now know that is what they were) started in as little as 8 hours after a missed dose and were experienced as a weird kind of 'headache', like an aura and included a lot of head and neck tension. I think the aura thing was the precursor to zaps.

 

My post CT withdrawal from it gave me a headache that lasted 3 days, felt like someone jammed a hot poker into my head and sent me to the ER finally. I also puked up everything I tried to eat or drink including pain pills. The zaps came later. GI disturbances and the most furious, quick and murderous temper I have ever had (and I know temper!)

 

Completely, utterly nasty piece of work that drug is if you do not come off it properly. My pdoc says she told me. It numbed me up so much that if she did, I never remembered it.

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Another vote for Effexor. And from what I have heard, Paxil. To think Dr Ajang gave me a free sample of Cymbalta last fall when I went to him complaining of Effexor w/d. I googled it when I got home and was horrified to see that people were talking about it online like I talk about Effexor!

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Have no idea how the diff SNRIs differ chemically. You see that reply I made to your post about flipping coin? It is either the way the drugs are formulated (like using a left-twist molecule as opposed to a right-twist one) by the diff manufacturers or something or else it is individual physiology differences. Or crap the drug companies added to their version of a SNRI pill to make it 'cooler'.

 

All a buncha crap IMO. They have to differ chemically or else they are cribbing off each other. And we can't have that, now can we.

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Going to go look at your reply now.

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Hello,

 

I'm not sure if anyone else has seen this or not, but I stumbled upon it after searching for a lawyer who might (yeah right, 2 years later) take my case.  Anyways, I found it very interesting, it contains information about cymbalta (an SNRI) that indicates around 80% of patients experience severe withdrawal upon cessation.  

 

I think that currently this lawsuit is being brought before some level of the court system as 25 seperate trials.  So hopefully 25 individuals who have suffered like I have, will get some sort of large financial compensation to having their lives seriously messed up.

 

 

 

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CB8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.schmidtlaw.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2Fcymbalta-lawsuit-mcdowell.pdf&ei=FiNlVZQ8zrWxBNHYg-gJ&usg=AFQjCNGsdiZEWMGiRzwPe1y5uLtv19sVRw&sig2=pUzcwIDUe0RLUq8XSIwb0w

 

As soon as you click on the link, the document will begin to download.  It's pretty interesting.

 

Let me know what you think of the document.

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I was happy when I learned of it. It's rare to see a figure for withdrawal as high as 80%, so that's great news. It's all coming out and seemingly as a greater clip this year. If this thing were to prevail, it could be good for effexor and pristiq cases. The three are close to triplets and all three are known for their horrendous long-term wd syndromes.

 

Journalists who only ask the KOL types if what patients say is true might start asking iconoclasts instead. Media reliance on APA talking points has cost many lives. The clusterF at U of M may bring more attention to decades of psych drug trial fraud, and a lot of it is due to the perseverance of a medical ethics professor at U of M, Carl Elliot.

 

There are still guys who should be in jail. Big name shrink/professors like Keller, Nemeroff, Dunning. Have you read the canon? David Healy, Rob Whitaker, Peter Breggin?

 

(BTW did you know that in the Media posts are Tweeted and Facebooked by an SA bot once a day? SA has accounts on both. If someone clicks through they see what you're seeing now, and like any non-member, can traverse the rest of the site other than the few sections that are hidden. They can't read this special SA grey, though.)

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I was happy when I learned of it. It's rare to see a figure for withdrawal as high as 80%, so that's great news. It's all coming out and seemingly as a greater clip this year. If this thing were to prevail, it could be good for effexor and pristiq cases. The three are close to triplets and all three are known for their horrendous long-term wd syndromes.

 

Journalists who only ask the KOL types if what patients say is true might start asking iconoclasts instead. Media reliance on APA talking points has cost many lives. The clusterF at U of M may bring more attention to decades of psych drug trial fraud, and a lot of it is due to the perseverance of a medical ethics professor at U of M, Carl Elliot.

 

There are still guys who should be in jail. Big name shrink/professors like Keller, Nemeroff, Dunning. Have you read the canon? David Healy, Rob Whitaker, Peter Breggin?

 

(BTW did you know that in the Media posts are Tweeted and Facebooked by an SA bot once a day? SA has accounts on both. If someone clicks through they see what you're seeing now, and like any non-member, can traverse the rest of the site other than the few sections that are hidden. They can't read this special SA grey, though.)

 

Just ordered Anatomy of an Epidemic.  I have trouble reading because my trigeminal nerve is so damaged from the medications, but I'll get through it little by little.

 

Boy would I like to actually do something to fight back against these bastards.  Unfortunately, it seems like one would need several million dollars in their bank account to hire a lawyer to get any justice in this country.  If someone had, say, 5-10 billion dollars and went to sue all of these people for various things, one could theoretically bankrupt them in the court systems. 

 

I doubt anyone on SA is worth 5 billion dollars, but it would be an effective way to "get back" at your favorite hated psyciatrist:  Hire a team of very expensive lawyers and sue them for like an absurd amount of money.

 

I wouldn't be too surprised if Eli Lilly and GKS got sued at an infrequent but steady rate by very wealthy individuals, and just settled out of court for several million dollars just to end the case and limit any further financial damage from accruing.

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Yes, money. And yes they drug cos pay but it's a bottomless pit. The way to wreck them is to stop taking pills. But people want their statins, which they don't need...

 

also, I found a topic about what I think is the same suit down in the commons, in the Events (etc) fyi

This link was there.

http://jpn.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/39-6-140097.pdf

 

Sucks that you have that pain on top of everything else. I and many others couldn't read for a year or more. Reading had been my best inanimate friend for as long as I can recall. I forgot about it during the drug years. I've resumed, but not reliably. It's to do with concentration. 

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Yes, money. And yes they drug cos pay but it's a bottomless pit. The way to wreck them is to stop taking pills. But people want their statins, which they don't need...

 

also, I found a topic about what I think is the same suit down in the commons, in the Events (etc) fyi

This link was there.

http://jpn.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/39-6-140097.pdf

 

Sucks that you have that pain on top of everything else. I and many others couldn't read for a year or more. Reading had been my best inanimate friend for as long as I can recall. I forgot about it during the drug years. I've resumed, but not reliably. It's to do with concentration. 

 

Interesting article, my childhood was far from ideal (was placed on adderall at the age of 8, and then it caused me to have tourrettes like symptoms, so the horrible neurologist prescribed me paxil at the age of like 12 for like 2 years, and then zoloft).  I seem to have been spared the worst withdrawals, but I'm pretty sure that the entirety of my life was affected by that horrible medication.  Probably shouldn't have ever touched the stuff again.  Whoops, guess that's what I get for trusting doctors.  Never again.

 

Glad to hear that I wasn't the only one who couldn't read!   It's been a real struggle for me too.  Hopefully in another year I'll be able to enjoy reading and be in as good of shape as you seem to be in.

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merged similar topics

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