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Papers about Post-SSRI Sexual Disorder (PSSD)

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Authoritative sources documenting Post-SSRI Sexual Disorder (PSSD), more fallout from antidepressant withdrawal syndrome. There are many, many anecdotal reports about this on the Web.

 

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Bahrick, Audrey S., and Mark M. Harris, "Sexual Side Effects of Antidepressant Medications: An Informed Consent Accountability Gap." Journal Of Contemporary Psychotherapy, Vol 39(2), June 2009, pp 135-143. No PubMed abstract. Full text here.

 

Abstract from the paper:

 

Sexual side effects of antidepressant medications are far more common than initially reported, and their scope, quality, and duration remain poorly captured in the literature. Antidepressant treatment emergent sexual dysfunctions may decrease clients’ quality of life, complicate psychotherapy, and damage the treatment alliance. Potential damage to the treatment alliance is greatest when clients have not been adequately informed of risks related to sexual side effects. It had previously been assumed that sexual side effects always resolve shortly after medications are discontinued. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that in some individuals, sexual dysfunction side effects may persist indefinitely. The authors argue that all psychologists should be well-informed about sexual side effects risks of antidepressant medications, should routinely conduct a pre-medication baseline assessment of sexual functioning, and take an active role in the informed consent process.

 

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Farnsworth K, Dinsmore W. Persistent sexual dysfunction in genitourinary medicine clinic attendees induced by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. International Journal of STD & AIDS [serial online]. 2009;20(1):68-69. No PubMed abstract. Full text here.

 

From this letter to the journal editor:

 

Sir: It is widely known that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can cause various types of sexual dysfunction (SD) and recent studies have shown that prevalence may be as high as 60%1 among SSRI users. Emerging evidence shows that in some patients SD may persist and even worsen, long after treatment cessation. It is this group of long-term post-SSRI treatment sufferers that we are concerned with here....

 

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Csoka AB, Bahrick A, Mehtonen O. Persistent sexual dysfunction after discontinuation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Journal of Sexual Medicine [serial online]. January 2008;5(1):227-233.

 

Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18173768 Full text here."]Full text here.[/url]

 

INTRODUCTION:

 

Sexual dysfunctions such as low libido, anorgasmia, genital anesthesia, and erectile dysfunction are very common in patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). It has been assumed that these side effects always resolve after discontinuing treatment, but recently, four cases were presented in which sexual function did not return to baseline. Here, we describe three more cases. Case #1: A 29-year-old with apparently permanent erectile dysfunction after taking fluoxetine 20 mg once daily for a 4-month period in 1996. Case #2: A 44-year-old male with persistent loss of libido, genital anesthesia, ejaculatory anhedonia, and erectile dysfunction after taking 20-mg once daily citalopram for 18 months. Case #3: A 28-year-old male with persistent loss of libido, genital anesthesia, and ejaculatory anhedonia since taking several different SSRIs over a 2-year period from 2003-2005.

 

RESULTS:

 

No psychological issues related to sexuality were found in any of the three cases, and all common causes of sexual dysfunction such as decreased testosterone, increased prolactin or diabetes were ruled out. Erectile capacity is temporarily restored for Case #1 with injectable alprostadil, and for Case #2 with oral sildenafil, but their other symptoms remain. Case #3 has had some reversal of symptoms with extended-release methylphenidate, although it is not yet known if these prosexual effects will persist when the drug is discontinued.

 

CONCLUSION:

 

SSRIs can cause long-term effects on all aspects of the sexual response cycle that may persist after they are discontinued. Mechanistic hypotheses including persistent endocrine and epigenetic gene expression alterations were briefly discussed.

 

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Kauffman, R., Murdock A. "Prolonged Post-Treatment Genital Anesthesia and Sexual Dysfunction Following Discontinuation of Citalopram and the Atypical Antidepressant Nefazodone." The Open Women Health Journal, 2007 (1), 1-3. No Pubmed abstract. Full text here.

 

Abstract from the paper: SSRI therapy is commonly associated with sexual side effects, but it is assumed that these distressing symptoms resolve with termination of therapy. The atypical antidepressant nefazodone is infrequently associated with sexual dysfunction and may be substituted for SSRI’s when sexual symptoms are intolerable. Recently, scattered case reports of persistent sexual dysfunction and genital anesthesia persisting well after termination of SSRI antidepressant therapy have surfaced. In each case, the underlying depressive disorder was in remission.

 

Case: A 32-year old women with major depression was treated with citalopram but switched to nefazodone after 4 weeks of therapy due to genital anesthesia and orgasmic dysfunction. These symptoms continued following institution of nefazodone therapy and have persisted for over a year since termination of antidepressant treatment. Her depression remains in full remission.

 

Discussion: It is likely that persistent post-treatment genital anesthesia and other sexual side effects are underreported, and physicians should be aware of this bothersome phenomenon. Formal post-treatment surveillance for this condition is war- ranted. Pharmacogenomic research may ultimately allow physicians to predict who is at risk for antidepressant induced sexual side effects.

 

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Bahrick, Audrey S, "Post-SSRI Sexual Dysfunction." ASAP Tablet, Vol 7(3), Sept 2006, pg 2.

No PubMed abstract. Full text here.

 

From the article:

 

Post-market research has now firmly established that the SSRIs and SNRIs can significantly affect most every aspect of sexual functioning at rates significantly higher than the 5-15% reported in pre-market trials. Depending on definitions of sexual dysfunction and methodology, post-market prevalence studies have found rates between 36% and 98%. The 5 to 15% rates of SSRI and SNRI-induced sexual side-effects listed in the current drug-insert literature are based on information obtained in the initial trials via spontaneous reports of individuals who had been on the medications for a short time. The differences in reported rates between the pre-market trials and post-market prevalence studies are an artifact of methodology; we now know that when individuals are directly asked about their experience of sexual side effects via either a structured clinical interview or a self-report inventory, we obtain vastly different rate information than if we rely on individuals to spontaneously volunteer personally sensitive information about changes in sexual functioning....

 

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Csoka AB, Shipko S. "Persistent sexual side effects after SSRI discontinuation." Psychother Psychosom. 2006;75(3):187-8. No PubMed abstract. Full text here.

 

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Bolton J, Sareen J, Reiss J. Genital anaesthesia persisting six years after sertraline discontinuation. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy [serial online]. July 2006;32(4):327-330. Full text here.

 

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Also see references here http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Post-SSRI-Sexual-Dysfunction

 

^ Bahrick A. Post SSRI Sexual Dysfunction. American Society for the Advancement of Pharmacotherapy Tablet 2006; 7:2-10.

^ Kauffman, RP. Persistent Sexual Side Effects after Discontinuation of Psychotropic Medications Primary Psychiatry. 2008;15:24.

^ Zajecka J, Mitchell S, Fawcett J. Treatment-emergent changes in sexual function with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as measured with the rush sexual inventory Psychopharmacol. Bull. 1997;33:755-60. PMID 9493488.

^ Balon, R. SSRI-associated sexual dysfunction Am J Psychiatry. 2006;163:1504-1509. PMID 16946173.

^ Montejo AL, Llorca G, Izquierdo JA, Carrasco JL, Daniel E, Perez-Sola V, Vicens E, Bousono M, Sanchez-Iglesias S, Franco M, Cabezudo A, Rubio V, Ortega MA, Puigdellivol M, Domenech JR, Allue B, Saez C, Mezquita B, Galvez I, Pacheco L, de Miguel E. Sexual dysfunction with antidepressive agents. Effect of the change to amineptine in patients with sexual dysfunction secondary to SSRI. Actas Esp Psiquiatr. 1999;27:23-34. PMID 10380144.

^ a b Csoka AB, Shipko S. Persistent sexual side effects after SSRI discontinuation. Psychother Psychosom 2006;75:187-8. PMID 16636635.

^ Bolton JM, Sareen J, Reiss JP. Genital anaesthesia persisting six years after sertraline discontinuation. J. Sex Marital Ther. 2006;32:327-30. PMID 16709553.

^ Kauffman RP, Murdock A. Prolonged Post-Treatment Genital Anesthesia and Sexual Dysfunction Following Discontinuation of Citalopram and the Atypical Antidepressant Nefazodone. The Open Women’s Health Journal. 2007;1:1-3.

^ Csoka AB, Bahrick AS, Mehtonen O-P. Persistent Sexual Dysfunction after Discontinuation of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). J Sex Med. 2008; 5:227-33.

^ Goldmeier D, Leiblum SR. Persistent genital arousal in women - a new syndrome entity Int J STD & AIDS 2006; 17:215-6. PMID 16595040.

^ Goldmeier D, Bell C, Richardson D. Withdrawal of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may cause increased atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and persistent sexual arousal in women? J Sex Med. 2006;3:376. PMID 16490037.

^ Leiblum SR, Goldmeier D.Persistent genital arousal disorder in women: case reports of association with anti-depressant usage and withdrawal.J Sex Marital Ther. 2008;34:150-9 PMID 18224549.

^ Adson DE, Kotlyar M. Premature ejaculation associated with citalopram withdrawal. Ann Pharmacother. 2003;37:1804-6. PMID 14632589.

^ Hines RN, Adams J, Buck GM, Faber W, Holson JF, Jacobson SW, Keszler M, McMartin K, Segraves RT, Singer LT, Sipes IG, Williams PL. NTP-CERHR Expert panel report on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of fluoxetine.NIH Publication No. 05-4471. 2004;1-211.

^ Maciag D, Simpson KL, Coppinger D, Lu Y, Wang Y, Lin RC, Paul IA. Neonatal Antidepressant Exposure has Lasting Effects on Behavior and Serotonin Circuitry. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2006;31:47-57. PMID 16012532.

^ de Jong TR, Snaphaan LJ, Pattij T, Veening JG, Waldinger MD, Cools AR, Olivier B. Effects of chronic treatment with fluvoxamine and paroxetine during adolescence on serotonin-related behavior in adult male rats. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2006;16:39-48. PMID 16107310.

^ Maciag D, Coppinger D, Paul IA. Evidence that the deficit in sexual behavior in adult rats neonatally exposed to citalopram is a consequence of 5-HT(1) receptor stimulation during development. Brain Res. 2006;1125:171-5. PMID 17101120.

^ Hansen HH, Mikkelsen JD. Long-term effects on serotonin transporter mRNA expression of chronic neonatal exposure to a serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Eur J Pharmacol. 1998;352:307-15. PMID 9716368.

^ Raap DK, Garcia F, Muma NA, Wolf WA, Battaglia G, van de Kar LD. Sustained desensitization of hypothalamic 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptors after discontinuation of fluoxetine: inhibited neuroendocrine responses to 8-hydroxy-2-(Dipropylamino)Tetralin in the absence of changes in Gi/o/z proteins. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1999;288:561-7. PMID 9918559.

^ Faure C, Ouissame MF, Nasser H. Long-term adaptive changes induced by serotonergic antidepressant drugs. Expert Rev Neurother. 2006;6:235-45. PMID 16466303.

^ Palotas M, Palotas A, Puskas LG, Kitajka K, Pakaski M, Janka Z, Molnar J, Penke B, Kalman J. Gene expression profile analysis of the rat cortex following treatment with imipramine and citalopram. Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2004;7:401-13. PMID 15315716.

^ Kalman J, Palotas A, Juhasz A, Rimanoczy A, Hugyecz M, Kovacs Z, Galsi G, Szabo Z, Pakaski M, Feher LZ, Janka Z, Puskas LG. Impact of venlafaxine on gene expression profile in lymphocytes of the elderly with major depression--evolution of antidepressants and the role of the "neuro-immune" system. Neurochem Res. 2005;30:1429-38. PMID 16341940.

^ Yamada M, Yamada M, Higuchi T. Antidepressant-elicited changes in gene expression: remodeling of neuronal circuits as a new hypothesis for drug efficacy. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2005;29:999-1009. PMID 15975701.

^ Boehm C, Newrzella D, Herberger S, Schramm N, Eisenhardt G, Schenk V, Sonntag-Buck V, Sorgenfrei O. Effects of antidepressant treatment on gene expression profile in mouse brain: cell type-specific transcription profiling using laser microdissection and microarray analysis. J Neurochem. 2006; 97 Suppl 1:44-9. PMID 16515540.

^ Hyman SE. Even chromatin gets the blues. Nat Neurosci. 2006;9:465-6. PMID 16568101.

^ Newton SS, Duman RS. Chromatin Remodeling: A Novel Mechanism of Psychotropic Drug Action (Relates to article by Cassel, et al. FastForward 2 May 2006). Mol Pharmacol. 2006;70:440-3. PMID 16728645.

^ Tsankova NM, Berton O, Renthal W, Kumar A, Neve RL, Nestler EJ. Sustained hippocampal chromatin regulation in a mouse model of depression and antidepressant action. Nat Neurosci. 2006;9:519-25. PMID 16501568.

^ Cassel S, Carouge D, Gensburger C, Anglard P, Burgun C, Dietrich JB, Aunis D, Zwiller J. Fluoxetine and cocaine induce the epigenetic factors MeCP2 and MBD1 in adult rat brain. Mol Pharmacol. 2006;70:487-92. PMID 16670375.

^ Altar CA, Laeng P, Jurata LW, Brockman JA, Lemire A, Bullard J, Bukhman YV, Young TA, Charles V, Palfreyman MG. Electroconvulsive seizures regulate gene expression of distinct neurotrophic signaling pathways. J Neurosci. 2004;24:2667-77. PMID 15028759.

^ Tsankova NM, Kumar A, Nestler EJ. Histone modifications at gene promoter regions in rat hippocampus after acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizures. J Neurosci. 2004;24:5603-10. PMID 15201333.

^ Cohen AJ. Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction Associated with Low Serum Free Testosterone. Psychiatry Online 1999.

^ Tanrikut C, Schlegel PN. Antidepressant-associated changes in semen parameters. Urology. 2007;69:185.e5-7. PMID 17270655.

^ Szyf M. Toward a Discipline of Pharmacoepigenomics. Current Pharmacogenomics 2004;2:357-377.

^ Lacasse JR, Leo J. Serotonin and Depression: A Disconnect between the Advertisements and the Scientific Literature. PLoS Medicine 2005;2:e392.

^ Moncrieff J, Cohen D. Do Antidepressants Cure or Create Abnormal Brain States? PLoS Medicine 2006;3:e240.

^ Damsa C, Bumb A, Bianchi-Demicheli F, Vidailhet P, Sterck R, Andreoli A, Beyenburg S. "Dopamine-dependent" side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a clinical review. J Clin Psychiatry. 2004;65:1064-8. PMID 15323590.

^ Keltner NL, McAfee KM, Taylor CL. Mechanisms and treatments of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. Perspect Psychiatr Care. 2002 Jul-Sep;38(3):111-6. PMID 12385082.

Edited by Altostrata
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btdt

As the above showed high prolactin was not the cause of PSSD why would they use Cabergoline as a preventative... I wonder does it work would it help me. Do you have any further understanding or information on this?

"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabergoline

Off-label/recreational uses

It has at times been used as an adjunct to SSRI antidepressants as there is some evidence that it counteracts certain side effects of those drugs, such as reduced libido and anorgasmia. It also has been suggested online that it has a possible recreational use in reducing or eliminating the male refractory period, thereby allowing men to experience multiple ejaculatory orgasms in rapid succession, and at least one scientific study supports those speculations.[7] It is also used by bodybuilders to control gynecomastia caused by elevated prolactin levels through the use of anabolic steroids such as nandrolone and trenbolone. Additionally, a systematic review and meta-analysis concluded that prophylactic treatment with cabergoline reduces the incidence, but not the severity, of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), without compromising pregnancy outcomes, in females undergoing stimulated cycles of in vitro fertilization (IVF).[8] Also, a study on rats found that cabergoline reduces voluntary alcohol consumption, possibly by increasing GDNF expression in the ventral tegmental area.[9"

 

I have always said I will not take drugs I do not understand seven years of PSSD has me asking questions about this one just asking.

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Altostrata

Occasionally someone on SSRIsex posts that they've tried cabergoline. Success seems to vary or they'd all be taking it!

 

It seems that males are the focus of the Wikipedia statement. Men seem to be more driven to try anything to increase virility. I've never heard of women taking it. Obviously, whatever hormonal effects it has would be different in women.

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Altostrata

To give an idea of how complex this is -- and not just a matter of dopamine, estrogen, or testoterone,

 

J Endocrinol. 2005 Sep;186(3):411-27.

The endocrinology of sexual arousal.

Bancroft J.

 

Source

 

The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, Morrison Hall third floor, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, USA. jbancrof@indiana.edu

 

Abstract at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16135662?dopt=Abstract Free full text at http://intl-joe.endocrinology-journals.org/content/186/3/411.full

 

The relevance of testosterone, oestradiol and certain peptides (oxytocin (OT), beta-endorphin and prolactin (PRL)) to sexual arousal in humans is reviewed. In addition to behavioural studies, evidence of distribution of gonadal steroid receptors in the brain and the limited evidence from brain imaging are also considered. Testosterone plays a key role in the adult male, with clear, consistent evidence from studies of hypogonadal and eugonadal men. The roles of testosterone in the development of sexual arousability, and in the aging male, are less clear. The relevance of aromatization and of non-sexual effects of testosterone which might indirectly influence sexual arousal are not well understood. Testosterone in the female presents a more complex, less consistent picture. One possible explanation is a much greater variability across women in responsiveness to testosterone. A 'desensitization hypothesis' to account for the striking gender differences is offered. There is limited evidence of a direct effect of oestradiol on sexual arousability in women. The extent to which testosterone in women acts by conversion to oestradiol or by increase of free oestradiol is not yet clear. The role of peptides in sexual arousal remains uncertain, partly because of the multiple roles and sites of action of most peptides. OT and beta-endorphin appear to have both excitatory and inhibitory effects. PRL has been proposed as an inhibitory factor via direct inhibition of dopaminergic activity, but the evidence for this is inconclusive. Whereas the traditional concept of 'hormone' continues to apply to the role of testosterone and oestradiol in sexual arousal, peptides present a more complex role.

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zenzeno

Kauffman, R., Murdock A. "Prolonged Post-Treatment Genital Anesthesia and Sexual Dysfunction Following Discontinuation of Citalopram and the Atypical Antidepressant Nefazodone." The Open Women Health Journal, 2007 (1), 1-3. No Pubmed abstract. Full text here.

 

Regarding this passage:
 
"Permanent changes in serotonin transmission physiology manifested by diminished sexual behavior have been reported in murine models following neonatal or adolescent SSRI exposure and hence, it is biologically plausible that ananalogous alteration of serotonin receptor neurophysiology might persist in adult humans."
 
Doesn't this paper seem to suggest that PSSD could be permanent after all?

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Altostrata

Why don't you write the authors for their opinion? Please post what you find out in this topic.

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zenzeno

I'll see if I can get a hold of the authors. If the conclusion to their paper is any indication, I'm guessing any potential update from either of them will be just as ambiguous: "Long term follow up will be crucial in order to determine if antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction remains a permanent phenomenon."

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Altostrata

Exactly. But they may have something interesting to say.

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anacleta

Genital anaesthesia persisting six years after sertraline discontinuation (2006)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16709553


Prolonged Post-Treatment Genital Anesthesia and Sexual Dysfunction Following Discontinuation of Citalopram and the Atypical Antidepressant Nefazodone (2007)
http://www.benthamscience.com/open/towhj/articles/V001/1TOWHJ.pdf


Persistent Sexual Dysfunction after Discontinuation of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (2008 )
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B38WtSY8BzGRODNkM2NlMDQtZTEyMi00YzdlLWJkYzgtOTE3OTQ2Mzg0NTA4/edit?hl=en


Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb contained 19 reports (2012)
http://www.lareb.nl/LarebCorporateWebsite/media/publicaties/KWB_2012_3_SSRI.pdf


The impact of persistent sexual side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors after discontinuing treatment: a qualitative study (2013)
http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5061&context=etd


One hundred and twenty cases of enduring sexual dysfunction following treatment (2014)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24902508


http://davidhealy.org/sexual-dysfunction-enduring-after-treatment-halts-s-death/

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Altostrata

Thank you, anacleta.

 

I merged your list with an existing topic. Please use search in this forum before starting a new Journals topic here.

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Altostrata

anacleta, I corrected the links above, thank you.

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crazykatie

I really haven't put much thought upon this bc I hate to think about it.

This year I finally researched to find why my libido was so decreased n why things that used to feel good sexually started hurting me. I knew it was the meds. Well this year, I was resolved to find another answer. We got my low estrogen boosted to average range. I got my prolactin level to normal again. So I have to accept its these meds.

I don't know if anyone else can relate, but I almost feel asexual. Sex is a chore to me. I just lay there hoping it will be over quick. Is this normal?

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forexworld12

I really haven't put much thought upon this bc I hate to think about it.

This year I finally researched to find why my libido was so decreased n why things that used to feel good sexually started hurting me. I knew it was the meds. Well this year, I was resolved to find another answer. We got my low estrogen boosted to average range. I got my prolactin level to normal again. So I have to accept its these meds.

I don't know if anyone else can relate, but I almost feel asexual. Sex is a chore to me. I just lay there hoping it will be over quick. Is this normal?

you were on some 10 drugs or more ....I am sure wellbutrin didn't work for pssd .it wont alone anyway ...but here is a thing You want to get off all the drugs and everything - turn the lifestyle around , go to gym ..strict diet  , protein rich diet .. and take a few supplements that are all mentioned over here .. this may take a few years but it is the best shot for recovering naturally ! some were saying about inositol treats symptoms of  PSSD and that is true because of the upregulation mechanism   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11267629

 

You were on trazodone but with combination of other medication ... I would strongly advice to get off all medication esp SSRI- they are the most toxic 

 

Trazodone  alone is an interesting compound that can  reverse some symptoms of PSSD .. Trazodone is an alpha-1-adrenergic blocker - which means it almost entirely blocks the vasoconstrictive effects of adrenaline.Trazodone  antagonizes the contractile serotonin receptors...That would be 5-HT2A etc .Trazodone may thus lower cortisol and prolactin levels and raise testosterone indirectly.

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btdt

http://survivingantidepressants.org/index.php?/topic/786-papers-about-post-ssri-sexual-disorder-pssd/#entry102373

  • Sexual arousal. Oxytocin injected into the cerebrospinal fluid causes spontaneous erections in rats,[12] reflecting actions in the hypothalamus and spinal cord.

This scientist say ssri type drugs can lower oxytocin how that may reflect on the rest of sex hard to say...but it is some connection at least.

read the link it is interesting

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nz11

I have given up any hope of an improvement in this area ..after 4 years drug free and waiting for a recovery that hasnt occured i now see it as permanent ..thats right i said the p word ...its permanent damage done by one proclaiming first to do no harm....yeah right!

Yes i also feel asexual. The nerves in this area imo have somehow  been chemically destroyed imo.

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btdt

Interesting btdt!! Thanks for sharing.

It was more for interests sake even tho I use to like sex I think hard to recall... but I think I had some amazing moments ... 

I don't know what it's worth is to me at this point in my life perhaps I have lived so long without it now I have settled... 

maybe if I had an urge and couldn't I would feel different.. yes I do think of it I know it is off the table... so try not to hamper myself more with thoughts of sex

 

If it all came back due to natural healing I would welcome it with open arms... I like to feel as human as possible as alive as possible.  however... I am in no way ever going to consider this option they are using in rats...

 

"Oxytocin injected into the cerebrospinal fluid causes spontaneous erections in rat"

 

not ever... or any other drug either... in the beginning I thought of trying this or that to treat it looked long and hard for a "cure"  maybe I recalled sex better then I felt the need to fix a  lot more then... I hate the thought that I have just given up on it.. I hate the thought I have just settled but maybe I have I just don't know.  I do know I am not willing to risk any of the hard won healing I have so far to get sex back not a chance in hell. 

 

I don't think anyone can guarantee the results of drugs on a person like me as I now react to most things I take enough I would never chance a drug to get sex back into my life... I don't trust the drugs to be safe... sorry once bitten twice shy. 

 

LOL this thought comes to mind... the three stooges... hit on the head gets amnesia and of course another hit on head cures him... :) we know what serial concussions do to sports players don't we.  I am just running off at the mouth here and this is just me... we are all different so I hear. 

 

Just my take on it.   peace all. 

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btdt

I was reading all the links in post #9

this one turned my head

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24902508

 

nt J Risk Saf Med. 2014;26(2):109-16. doi: 10.3233/JRS-140617.
One hundred and twenty cases of enduring sexual dysfunction following treatment.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

There have been reports for over a decade linking serotonin reuptake inhibitors, finasteride and isotretinoin with enduring sexual dysfunction after treatment stops.

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the clinical pictures linked to all 3 drugs.

METHODS:

We have selected 120 reports to RxISK.org reporting the problem and mined these for data on age, gender, drug of use, and impact of the problem.

RESULTS:

The data make it clear that the three drugs show extensive overlap in symptom profile, regardless of sex or country of origin.

CONCLUSIONS:

The availability of 120 reports from over 20 countries add to the case for the validity of the syndrome. This is severe and enduring condition can result in death. An understanding of its physiology and an approach to treatment are needed.

KEYWORDS:

SSRIs; erectile dysfunction; finasteride; genital anesthesia; isotretinoin; loss of libido

" This is severe and enduring condition can result in death."

 

The article gives no indication of cause of death other than it is related to the use of said drugs and PSSD

 

It makes me curious. 

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btdt

 

I really haven't put much thought upon this bc I hate to think about it.

This year I finally researched to find why my libido was so decreased n why things that used to feel good sexually started hurting me. I knew it was the meds. Well this year, I was resolved to find another answer. We got my low estrogen boosted to average range. I got my prolactin level to normal again. So I have to accept its these meds.

I don't know if anyone else can relate, but I almost feel asexual. Sex is a chore to me. I just lay there hoping it will be over quick. Is this normal?

you were on some 10 drugs or more ....I am sure wellbutrin didn't work for pssd .it wont alone anyway ...but here is a thing You want to get off all the drugs and everything - turn the lifestyle around , go to gym ..strict diet  , protein rich diet .. and take a few supplements that are all mentioned over here .. this may take a few years but it is the best shot for recovering naturally ! some were saying about inositol treats symptoms of  PSSD and that is true because of the upregulation mechanism   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11267629

 

You were on trazodone but with combination of other medication ... I would strongly advice to get off all medication esp SSRI- they are the most toxic 

 

Trazodone  alone is an interesting compound that can  reverse some symptoms of PSSD .. Trazodone is an alpha-1-adrenergic blocker - which means it almost entirely blocks the vasoconstrictive effects of adrenaline.Trazodone  antagonizes the contractile serotonin receptors...That would be 5-HT2A etc .Trazodone may thus lower cortisol and prolactin levels and raise testosterone indirectly.

 

"Trazodone  alone is an interesting compound that can  reverse some symptoms of PSSD .. Trazodone is an alpha-1-adrenergic blocker - which means it almost entirely blocks the vasoconstrictive effects of adrenaline.Trazodone  antagonizes the contractile serotonin receptors...That would be 5-HT2A etc .Trazodone may thus lower cortisol and prolactin levels and raise testosterone indirectly."

 

Ok I would like to start with the 5-HT2A

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5-HT2A_receptor

"Downregulation of post-synaptic 5-HT2A receptor is an adaptive process provoked by chronic administration of SSRIs and classical antipsychotics."

 

So there is no doubt at this point that ssri drugs are the cause of this PSSD issue.  Downregulation is at least part of the problem if not all as it appears complex. 

 

ssri induced - vasoconstrictive effects of adrenaline is this true?

seems it is or can be...close enough 

 

  • Antidepressant Use Linked With Increased Atherosclerosis
    www.medscape.com/viewarticle/740116
    •  
    •  
     

    Apr 2, 2011 - In a study of twins, the one taking any class of antidepressant had a 5% ... serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), can cause vasoconstriction of various ... the observational nature of the analysis, noting that these results do not  ...

     

    If another drug helped I would not take it not a psych drug like this... I was going to look but came to a site already talking about it

     

    decided to leave the search here with this site specific to the topic  

    http://www.pssdforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=39&p=787

    PSSD collaborative research

    A forum dedicated to collaborative research into PSSD (post SSRI sexual dysfunction).

     

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Altostrata

btdt, I hid your post. It was off-topic. Please respect the original intention of every topic, particularly those in the Journals forum.

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btdt

btdt, I hid your post. It was off-topic. Please respect the original intention of every topic, particularly those in the Journals forum.

could you please put it in my own thread 

as i do not want to lose it completely

thanks

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Altostrata

Please stop making more work for me and the moderators.

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lionofJuda

Are you all saying that there is no healing

for some of us

and for some others yes

Am I getting the picture

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nz11

Dont know if this is the right place to post this but all i have is the title,

 

Does anyone know anything about this

 

Waldinger MD et al Penile anaesthesia in post ssri sexual dysfunction responds to low power laser irradiation.A case study and hypothesis about the role of trasiaent receptor potential TRP ion channels. European Journal of Pharmacology 2014 doi 10.1016

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Altostrata

You'd have to Google to find more information.

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btdt

Dont know if this is the right place to post this but all i have is the title,

 

Does anyone know anything about this

 

Waldinger MD et al Penile anaesthesia in post ssri sexual dysfunction responds to low power laser irradiation.A case study and hypothesis about the role of trasiaent receptor potential TRP ion channels. European Journal of Pharmacology 2014 doi 10.1016

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25483212

the study 

" After 20 LPLI-treatment sessions of 15min each, patient reported partial return of penile touch and temperature sensation. Clinical improvement of glans penis sensitivity was reported to 20% and 40%, compared to pre-paroxetine treatment penile sensitivity during erect and flaccid states, respectively. However, anejaculation and erectile difficulties remained unchanged. "

 

"It is hypothesized that SSRI treatment induces disturbances of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of mechano-, thermo- and chemosensitive nerve endings and receptors resulting in the penile anesthesia in PSSD. It is further hypothesized that there are two types of PSSD, one of which occurs soon after the start of SSRI treatment."

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nz11

Thanks for posting that btdt.

Having trouble accessing the link but i think its probably my computer. i have assumed you have simply got the abstract only. 

 

Basically it appears there idea of lazer at the end of the day does stuff all. 

I have lost all trust whatsoever with the medical profession so i certainly wont allow them to lazer me.They have already done enough damage as it is.

 

Personally i believe damage has also been done in the brain and cns train track that leads from upstairs to downstairs ...its been totally sabotaged !

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btdt

More research on the ion channels may show something it is not like anyone is really trying to fix this... I don't think it is a real big push... I wish it were. Something is wrong we know that sex is gone I know that... getting it back online is a process for some but after all this time and the wild headaches I get ...more like my brain is going to explode approaching orgasm... well that pain is not worth it.  Something is still wrong. Some people just get better for me it did not happen. Not yet at any rate and they say the only emotion greater than fear is hope... so if you can keep some hope maybe it will be helpful. 

 

Not so sure I can muster hope myself but still suggest it as a better way to live in withdrawal then the alternative... again is kind of like a choice but not really a real choice ... if that makes any sense. 

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westcoast

NZ, I saw an article about this drug being used for PSSD. Just googled the drug name and pssd

 

Had you heard of it?

Cyproheptadine

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nz11

 

NZ, I saw an article about this drug being used for PSSD. Just googled the drug name and pssd

 

Had you heard of it?

Cyproheptadine

 

No i havent. But the last thing i will be doing is swallowing more poisons.

Personally i believe the damage is so wide and deep that there is no way a drug will get us out of this silent torture.

But thanks maybe i'll have a search and a read.

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westcoast

I know how you feel. Once bitten, twice bitten, thrice bitten...

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