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Dizziness, vertigo, light-headedness etc & rocking/swaying/boat

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IrishMonkey92

Did anyone’s rocking/swaying that they’ve had for a long time go away? 

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LilyBlueRose

I am on about 6 months of very very very very mild swaying/dizziness. So mild that I rarely think of it anymore except sometimes I get anxious in bed and can feel it slightly more, but I force myself not to think about it. 

 

I can finally sleep in a bed again! A window that I so can tolerate! Heaps better than last year. 

 

Are you seeing any improvement? 

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IrishMonkey92
5 hours ago, Kalinia said:

I am on about 6 months of very very very very mild swaying/dizziness. So mild that I rarely think of it anymore except sometimes I get anxious in bed and can feel it slightly more, but I force myself not to think about it. 

 

I can finally sleep in a bed again! A window that I so can tolerate! Heaps better than last year. 

 

Are you seeing any improvement? 

I was having milder rocking/swaying but I don’t know if that was me being calm and not paying much attention to them, or if it was genuinely a window.

 

its worse again now after a bit of an adverse reaction/anxious moment after eating a dinner. Body was pulsating like crazy afterwards and made the swaying worse since then. This really has no rhyme or reason to it. 

 

Im going to change career to become a driver. That way I can be at peace during the day with the rocking, swaying, as it goes away when in motion. However I’m fearful of the rebound when I get out. So I need to trial out an average day in journeys to see if I could live with the rebound. 

 

Does yours go away in motion and does it come back worse after being in a car? If so, how long does it stay worse for? Do you drive or take long journeys? 

 

I have heard people with MdDS (what my symptoms match mostly to) have had success with taking l-theanine, which is a plant based amino acid found in green tea.  It is a GABA agonist, and lowers glutamate. That would explain why people with MdDS is eased with use of Benzos or SSRI’s and would also explain why some get this horrible symptom set after coming off Benzo and ssri’s  too quickly.

 

There are some reports of MdDS following use or withdrawal from serotonergic medications. The connection here is that serotonin may inhibit glutamate, an excitatory transmitter in the vestibular nucleus (Smith and Darlington, 2010.). This idea also provides an explanation why serotonergic medications may help MdDS (see treatment section).”

https://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/central/mdd.html

 

Here is someone I found that over did it on green tea and found it out them into ‘remission’. I can’t remember where I got the quote from, but it’s strangely linking with our theory of withdrawal being due to glutamate toxicity. 

 

"I had this for the first time after a seven day ocean cruise. It lasted for quite a while and kept me from functioning properly. One day for lunch I went to an Asian restaurant and had several cups of green tea with my meal. After the meal I noticed I felt much better. It lasted about a day, so I drank more green tea to help with the symptoms... and it worked. I continued drinking several cups of green tea a day for a few weeks as my symptoms gradually subsided. They are completely gone now! I read that green tea helped rats with spatial awareness, not sure if that is it or not. All I know is my symptoms went from extremely debilitating, to the point where I could not concentrate on the task at hand, to being absolutely gone! It is an inexpensive thing to try... why not? Just a note I drank straight green tea, not mixed with other flavors or teas, with nothing else in it."

 

Its worth a try. I’ve also been in contact with another MdDS person on Facebook in remission who said she just tried Taurine and L-Theanine in high doses for 5 weeks and it slowly went. She has continued with this however, unlike the green tea drinker. 

 

If if you search for ‘theanine’ on this website, you’ll find a good lot of promising comments about it. It’s an amino acid, and not addictive, with no known upper limit of dosing. They dosed a rat with like 40g (it’s prescribed in 200mg usually) and it didn’t have any affect. It arrives Wednesday. 

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LilyBlueRose

Oh interesting! Please keep me updated!!! 

 

My last wave was brought on after a long anxious car ride! 2 hours. 

 

I've been on hour. Or more rides lately  but havnt noticed an affect from it. 

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IrishMonkey92
2 minutes ago, Kalinia said:

Oh interesting! Please keep me updated!!! 

 

My last wave was brought on after a long anxious car ride! 2 hours. 

 

I've been on hour. Or more rides lately  but havnt noticed an affect from it. 

I will! I’m absolutely terrified of taking a supplement as I’ve reacted adversely to a lot of things that I really shouldn’t. However I’m reassured this is as tolerable as the magnesium I take. 

 

Can I ask what other symptoms you have other than the rocking/swaying? 

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LilyBlueRose

I go through waves of anxiety but I've had that forever as well as occasional sleep issues. 

 

The one that stayed around a bit is pressure in my ears/eustachian tube dysfunction. Still better than last year thankfully! 

 

I just hit the two year mark of coming off! I think the supplement is worth trying! 

 

It sounds like you definitely were in a window! Same thing happened to me several times. 

 

I truly am hopeful that this will fully go away for us sometime. 

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IrishMonkey92
2 minutes ago, Kalinia said:

I go through waves of anxiety but I've had that forever as well as occasional sleep issues. 

 

The one that stayed around a bit is pressure in my ears/eustachian tube dysfunction. Still better than last year thankfully! 

 

I just hit the two year mark of coming off! I think the supplement is worth trying! 

 

It sounds like you definitely were in a window! Same thing happened to me several times. 

 

I truly am hopeful that this will fully go away for us sometime. 

Me too. I really really hope it’s withdrawal and it will all go away. I’ve seen people at 4 years who CT’d and have healed. So at least we’re half way there. I’m 2.5 years. 

 

Ive unfortunately came across some people who have this from SSRI’s and they have a long history of this. I’d rather not daunt on it. 

 

Do you find you have any triggers which make this worse for you? 

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LilyBlueRose

Honestly this past 6 months not much has made it worse! Maybe slightly if my ears are more Full of pressure or I'm extra anxious and think about it coming back etc. But nothing for long or unbearable. 

 

This shows me that it's possible to heal. Even if I have waves again I know the possibility for long term windows or forever healing is possible! 

 

I believe the same for you, truly! 

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IrishMonkey92
2 minutes ago, Kalinia said:

Honestly this past 6 months not much has made it worse! Maybe slightly if my ears are more Full of pressure or I'm extra anxious and think about it coming back etc. But nothing for long or unbearable. 

 

This shows me that it's possible to heal. Even if I have waves again I know the possibility for long term windows or forever healing is possible! 

 

I believe the same for you, truly! 

Thank you so much. That means a lot.

 

I’ve been having intrusive thoughts about ending it all. It’s a major blockage on my life. I’ve been robbed of my youth. 

 

I don’t care if it takes another 2 years. Just as long as it goes away. 

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LilyBlueRose

I've been there too! And then this 6 month window came and the hope was built up! Yours WILL go away! Keep looking for answers and help if you need it. You got this! 

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IrishMonkey92
24 minutes ago, Kalinia said:

I've been there too! And then this 6 month window came and the hope was built up! Yours WILL go away! Keep looking for answers and help if you need it. You got this! 

You’re amazing. Thank you! I too was optimistic for many weeks. It’s almost as if a dark cloud just comes over me once more. Perhaps this is a wave? I’m now totally pessimistic again. It’s hard to see the sun when there are so many dark clouds in the way. 

 

You’ve given that bit of encouragement to just keep on fighting for another while. Thank you. I wish you speedy recovery and please use this thread as an update! I want to hear someone come back and state they had this and now are healed 100%. There has yet to be one. 

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LilyBlueRose

I will update! I know exactly how you feel. I sink down into darkness too. But the light will come. Again for you soon! 

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IrishMonkey92

Update: I tried the L-Theanine, and it’s not really doing much, and it may actually be making me worse. I’m crying a lot and thinking suicidal thoughts. 

 

My mind is constantly ruminating and chewing on the possibility of this being something else and not withdrawal - however I don’t really care what it is, just as long as it goes away! 

 

I’m glad that I mentioned above that I’ve been doing worse BEFORE trying the L-theanine. Because that makes me realise I was going to get worse anyway. 

 

Ive trialled out my change of career and drove a lot for 4 hours or so, and my god... it made everything 10x worse. I’m bouncing again and the sea saw floor walking is back. Has anyone experienced this with long car journeys? 

 

Can I get a confirmation that people feel better in a car with this? Worse after a long journey? And when sitting still you feel your whole body is pulsating like you’re on a water raft or body? 

 

Kalina are you healed? 

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Junglechicken

Yes, I've been experiencing this since my last dose drop 2 weeks ago.

 

A sense of swaying, or my head swaying, dizziness................I can't be sure what sets it off either.

 

Feel like I'm going nuts.

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IrishMonkey92
1 hour ago, Junglechicken said:

Yes, I've been experiencing this since my last dose drop 2 weeks ago.

 

A sense of swaying, or my head swaying, dizziness................I can't be sure what sets it off either.

 

Feel like I'm going nuts.

I really feel sorry for you. This is hell. This symptom is probably the most debilitating and difficult to ignore. 

 

What drug have you reduced and what other symptoms do you have? 

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Junglechicken

Hi Irish,

 

The last drop I did was a big one (50%) of Lexapro, 2 weeks ago.

 

Yes, I get the swaying, dizziness, heavy head, weakness in the legs, and GERD.

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apace41
6 minutes ago, IrishMonkey92 said:

This symptom is probably the most debilitating and difficult to ignore. 

 

IrishMonkey,

 

I am suffering with dizziness for quite some time so I can empathize and feel qualified to comment.  It sucks.  It is horrible.  It is very annoying.  However, we do ourselves no favors when we use terms like "most" and "worst" when we describe what is happening to us.  I'm fairly confident that those who have akathisia think their symptom is the "worst" and it's hard to doubt that those with suicidal ideation can lay a strong claim to that mantle.  The more we catastrophize about any particular symptom the more we allow it to weigh on our minds.  Since we know it is from the withdrawal and the reaction the body is having, and therefore we know it's not "dangerous", we need to do our best to change our thoughts when it hits and accept it for what it is -- a temporary (albeit for some a long time temporary) annoyance.

 

Because the sense of balance is such a fundamental sense for humans, the feeling that we are losing or have lost the ability to balance ourselves and know where we are in space is intrinsically frightening so it is logical that we will experience a lot of "first fear" when it hits.  Learning how to talk ourselves down and not allow that first fear to spiral into a lot of second fear of "what if it's MS" or "what if it's a brain tumor" will go a long way toward allowing us to calm down our CNS and move past the fear of the symptom.

 

Not easy and I'm hardly suggesting I've mastered it, but something to aspire to.

 

Best,

 

Andy 

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IrishMonkey92
7 minutes ago, apace41 said:

 

IrishMonkey,

 

I am suffering with dizziness for quite some time so I can empathize and feel qualified to comment.  It sucks.  It is horrible.  It is very annoying.  However, we do ourselves no favors when we use terms like "most" and "worst" when we describe what is happening to us.  I'm fairly confident that those who have akathisia think their symptom is the "worst" and it's hard to doubt that those with suicidal ideation can lay a strong claim to that mantle.  The more we catastrophize about any particular symptom the more we allow it to weigh on our minds.  Since we know it is from the withdrawal and the reaction the body is having, and therefore we know it's not "dangerous", we need to do our best to change our thoughts when it hits and accept it for what it is -- a temporary (albeit for some a long time temporary) annoyance.

 

Because the sense of balance is such a fundamental sense for humans, the feeling that we are losing or have lost the ability to balance ourselves and know where we are in space is intrinsically frightening so it is logical that we will experience a lot of "first fear" when it hits.  Learning how to talk ourselves down and not allow that first fear to spiral into a lot of second fear of "what if it's MS" or "what if it's a brain tumor" will go a long way toward allowing us to calm down our CNS and move past the fear of the symptom.

 

Not easy and I'm hardly suggesting I've mastered it, but something to aspire to.

 

Best,

 

Andy 

Hi Andy. 

 

Thanks for the knowledge.

 

I’ve had this nearly 3 years. I’m long passed the stage of first fear. It’s just an annoyance and hindrance to me now. I don’t fear it. I’ve felt it at a 10 and that’s fearing but I’m normally at a 1/2 most days. My balance is perfect. However this goes away in the car and gets worse after travel. So it’s hard to differentiate from Mal De Debarquement Syndrome. 

 

I’ve been to the point of suicide with it, just because it’s gone on so long. I’m sure those with Akathisia have been in similar situations. 

 

Thanks, 

irish 

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apace41
1 minute ago, IrishMonkey92 said:

I’ve had this nearly 3 years. I’m long passed the stage of first fear. It’s just an annoyance and hindrance to me now. I don’t fear it. I’ve felt it at a 10 and that’s fearing but I’m normally at a 1/2 most days. My balance is perfect. However this goes away in the car and gets worse after travel. So it’s hard to differentiate from Mal De Debarquement Syndrome. 

 

I’ve been to the point of suicide with it, just because it’s gone on so long. I’m sure those with Akathisia have been in similar situations. 

 

I'm so sorry to hear that, IM.  I hope you don't think I was speaking down to you about a condition you already know a ton about.  I have not read your thread so I didn't know your history.  

 

There are plenty of stories of people in the withdrawal and anxiety contexts who have seen this symptom last for longer than yours has and finally saw it lift and get better.  I know that it is hard to believe that.  My dizziness started recurring in 2012 and while it has not been 24/7 until fairly recently, I know how it feels to deal with it for a very long time.

 

I would only say that while you may no longer consciously fear the symptom when it hits, it is highly likely that your system reacts on a subconscious, hardwired basis.  Time and relaxation will hopefully see that fade completely for you.

 

I hope I didn't offend.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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IrishMonkey92
1 minute ago, apace41 said:

 

I'm so sorry to hear that, IM.  I hope you don't think I was speaking down to you about a condition you already know a ton about.  I have not read your thread so I didn't know your history.  

 

There are plenty of stories of people in the withdrawal and anxiety contexts who have seen this symptom last for longer than yours has and finally saw it lift and get better.  I know that it is hard to believe that.  My dizziness started recurring in 2012 and while it has not been 24/7 until fairly recently, I know how it feels to deal with it for a very long time.

 

I would only say that while you may no longer consciously fear the symptom when it hits, it is highly likely that your system reacts on a subconscious, hardwired basis.  Time and relaxation will hopefully see that fade completely for you.

 

I hope I didn't offend.

 

Best,

 

Andy

No no not at all! 

 

You are probably right. It’s just frustrating having a limited life at such a young age. 

 

Is your dizziness of the swaying kind? Have you had it from anxiety/withdrawal? 

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apace41
3 hours ago, IrishMonkey92 said:

It’s just frustrating having a limited life at such a young age. 

 

God willing it will disappear over time.  The good news about being young is you still have a lot of life left to live after you fully heal.  And you will.

 

3 hours ago, IrishMonkey92 said:

Is your dizziness of the swaying kind? Have you had it from anxiety/withdrawal? 

 

It's one of those things that is hard to define. I think it is probably the same thing but you tell me -- it's the feeling of being unsteady, off, walking on a trampoline, like you are on a boat, feeling like you are on a moonbounce; etc.  That rocking discomfort is what gets one into the mal de debarquement category when you start doing the research.  I know -- I've been diagnosed with that at one time, vestibular migraine at another, and so on and so on.  

 

Assuming that is the case, you should look at anxietycentre.com and see their discussion of anxiety and how the system gets "hyperstimulated" and then locked in fight or flight and the resulting dizziness.  Sounds JUST like what is described by people who are in withdrawal.  My hypothesis on all of this is that drugs and withdrawal from the drugs results in hyperstimulation and a frozen limbic system.  You can't get out of fight or flight and the body pumps our stress hormones, primarily cortisol, without regard to any "real" threats.  If this resonates with you let's talk more.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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IrishMonkey92
49 minutes ago, apace41 said:

 

God willing it will disappear over time.  The good news about being young is you still have a lot of life left to live after you fully heal.  And you will.

 

 

It's one of those things that is hard to define. I think it is probably the same thing but you tell me -- it's the feeling of being unsteady, off, walking on a trampoline, like you are on a boat, feeling like you are on a moonbounce; etc.  That rocking discomfort is what gets one into the mal de debarquement category when you start doing the research.  I know -- I've been diagnosed with that at one time, vestibular migraine at another, and so on and so on.  

 

Assuming that is the case, you should look at anxietycentre.com and see their discussion of anxiety and how the system gets "hyperstimulated" and then locked in fight or flight and the resulting dizziness.  Sounds JUST like what is described by people who are in withdrawal.  My hypothesis on all of this is that drugs and withdrawal from the drugs results in hyperstimulation and a frozen limbic system.  You can't get out of fight or flight and the body pumps our stress hormones, primarily cortisol, without regard to any "real" threats.  If this resonates with you let's talk more.

 

Best,

 

Andy

It does. PM me 

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Bonzee

I’m a 22 year old male with these symptoms, been having them for years (ever since freshman year of High School). Once I started having panic attacks around that time, stressful situations triggered this sensation. I also had a lot of brain fog / derealization. Anyone else have derealization with this sensation? All of these symptoms of course cause a lot of anxiety. My anxiety got so bad to the point in freshman year of college I had to be put on an SSRI, escitalopram. I’m happy to say the dizziness subsided almost 100% and so did my anxiety. I’m currently in the process of weaning myself off the medication, but the withdrawal has been horrendous. Kind of a double-edged sword unfortunately. The medication helped so much, but it’s so hard to get off of once you feel you can manage your anxiety on your own.

 

 

I was off only for 10 days and now I reinstated half the dose I was at and all the dizzy symptoms have returned, but worse than before. Waiting to stabilize and see if I can either go back up to the same dosage, or if my nervous system is hypersensitive enough where I just have to get off it now. Not look forward to either approach, anybody who has maybe gone through something similar I’m all ears.

 

Evan

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IrishMonkey92
2 hours ago, Bonzee said:

I’m a 22 year old male with these symptoms, been having them for years (ever since freshman year of High School). Once I started having panic attacks around that time, stressful situations triggered this sensation. I also had a lot of brain fog / derealization. Anyone else have derealization with this sensation? All of these symptoms of course cause a lot of anxiety. My anxiety got so bad to the point in freshman year of college I had to be put on an SSRI, escitalopram. I’m happy to say the dizziness subsided almost 100% and so did my anxiety. I’m currently in the process of weaning myself off the medication, but the withdrawal has been horrendous. Kind of a double-edged sword unfortunately. The medication helped so much, but it’s so hard to get off of once you feel you can manage your anxiety on your own.

 

 

I was off only for 10 days and now I reinstated half the dose I was at and all the dizzy symptoms have returned, but worse than before. Waiting to stabilize and see if I can either go back up to the same dosage, or if my nervous system is hypersensitive enough where I just have to get off it now. Not look forward to either approach, anybody who has maybe gone through something similar I’m all ears.

 

Evan

What type of dizziness are you getting? 

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Bonzee
1 hour ago, IrishMonkey92 said:

What type of dizziness are you getting? 

 

When I was younger before the medication I had the leveling off elevator that people describe. After that in college and now after the medication WD I have like the "floaty boat" feeling, which is made worse by head movement. I also have presumably low BP when changing positions (mostly from lying down to standing). I never had these while on the medication.

 

The low BP and floaty boat could be perceived as lightheadedness, but lightheadedness made worse with head movement is most likely vestibular in origin from what I've read...

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IrishMonkey92
2 hours ago, Bonzee said:

 

When I was younger before the medication I had the leveling off elevator that people describe. After that in college and now after the medication WD I have like the "floaty boat" feeling, which is made worse by head movement. I also have presumably low BP when changing positions (mostly from lying down to standing). I never had these while on the medication.

 

The low BP and floaty boat could be perceived as lightheadedness, but lightheadedness made worse with head movement is most likely vestibular in origin from what I've read...

So you don’t feel like you’re rocking/swaying on a boat when still or bouncing/dipping up and down when you walk? 

 

Any pulsating of the blood around the body? 

 

How long were you on the medication? What makes you think it’s Vestibular if stress kicked it off initially and meds make it go away?

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Bonzee
7 minutes ago, IrishMonkey92 said:

So you don’t feel like you’re rocking/swaying on a boat when still or bouncing/dipping up and down when you walk? 

 

Any pulsating of the blood around the body? 

 

How long were you on the medication? What makes you think it’s Vestibular if stress kicked it off initially and meds make it go away?

 

I don't feel like I'm swaying, I feel like my head is light and any head movement makes it feel not oriented correctly, if that makes sense. Like, if I tilt my head to the side, as in the left side of my face points upward, I feel an exaggerated response to the movement. When I'm walking around I can feel off-kilter. Not extreme where I'm having to hold on to things, but enough where I can notice it, and sometimes feel a little clumsy. My ears have been checked out extensively before this medication and that was the reason I got on it, because the Neuro-Otologist wasn't seeing anything physical and presumably it was all psychological. I've had many scans including of my head and ear systems. 

 

I had the "bouncing" sensation, as explained in my last reply, in high school and thereabouts, but my dizziness changes to a more disequilibrium-type afterward. No real pulsating, but the WD has caused some tingling in my legs...nerve issues. Comes and goes...and I was on the medication for 3 years per my signature. You can research Chronic Subjective Dizziness, or Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness, as it has been coined in the WHO. It's kicked off by a stressful event or series of events that cause dizziness, such as panic attacks, vestibular issues (migraine/neuritis/BPPV, etc.) or other provoking conditions, and the brain just simply doesn't recognize and process the sensory information normally again. I had pretty extensive problems with my ears...my right ear was constantly infected when I was younger and I had a tube and a perforation in that eardrum, which I had surgery for. So, CSD kicks in around that time and anxiety/panic occurs concurrently...and this causes the dizziness to persist indefinitely...the only relief I had was starting escitalopram, which reduced my symptoms almost 100%. Now, they are back, and I'm very sensitive, so they feel worse. The main treatment for CSD is SSRIs (as they are really the only thing that works right now), so I may be back on full dose eventually. Just can't live with constant dizziness like I used to, it causes a lot of anxiety.

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IrishMonkey92
2 hours ago, Bonzee said:

 

I don't feel like I'm swaying, I feel like my head is light and any head movement makes it feel not oriented correctly, if that makes sense. Like, if I tilt my head to the side, as in the left side of my face points upward, I feel an exaggerated response to the movement. When I'm walking around I can feel off-kilter. Not extreme where I'm having to hold on to things, but enough where I can notice it, and sometimes feel a little clumsy. My ears have been checked out extensively before this medication and that was the reason I got on it, because the Neuro-Otologist wasn't seeing anything physical and presumably it was all psychological. I've had many scans including of my head and ear systems. 

 

I had the "bouncing" sensation, as explained in my last reply, in high school and thereabouts, but my dizziness changes to a more disequilibrium-type afterward. No real pulsating, but the WD has caused some tingling in my legs...nerve issues. Comes and goes...and I was on the medication for 3 years per my signature. You can research Chronic Subjective Dizziness, or Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness, as it has been coined in the WHO. It's kicked off by a stressful event or series of events that cause dizziness, such as panic attacks, vestibular issues (migraine/neuritis/BPPV, etc.) or other provoking conditions, and the brain just simply doesn't recognize and process the sensory information normally again. I had pretty extensive problems with my ears...my right ear was constantly infected when I was younger and I had a tube and a perforation in that eardrum, which I had surgery for. So, CSD kicks in around that time and anxiety/panic occurs concurrently...and this causes the dizziness to persist indefinitely...the only relief I had was starting escitalopram, which reduced my symptoms almost 100%. Now, they are back, and I'm very sensitive, so they feel worse. The main treatment for CSD is SSRIs (as they are really the only thing that works right now), so I may be back on full dose eventually. Just can't live with constant dizziness like I used to, it causes a lot of anxiety.

Yeah I know all about PPPD. It’s the same as MdDS. MdDS can be triggered spontaneously by stress/anxiety. 

 

Ive no idea  if mine has been caused by withdrawal or anxiety. It started 5 months after I stopped my meds. Never had any issues on them or prior to that. But I did have a major panic attack and so I’ve been left with this. Have it near 3 years now. 

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apace41
9 hours ago, Bonzee said:

I’m a 22 year old male with these symptoms, been having them for years (ever since freshman year of High School). Once I started having panic attacks around that time, stressful situations triggered this sensation. I also had a lot of brain fog / derealization. Anyone else have derealization with this sensation? All of these symptoms of course cause a lot of anxiety. My anxiety got so bad to the point in freshman year of college I had to be put on an SSRI, escitalopram. I’m happy to say the dizziness subsided almost 100% and so did my anxiety. I’m currently in the process of weaning myself off the medication, but the withdrawal has been horrendous. Kind of a double-edged sword unfortunately. The medication helped so much, but it’s so hard to get off of once you feel you can manage your anxiety on your own.

 

 

I was off only for 10 days and now I reinstated half the dose I was at and all the dizzy symptoms have returned, but worse than before. Waiting to stabilize and see if I can either go back up to the same dosage, or if my nervous system is hypersensitive enough where I just have to get off it now. Not look forward to either approach, anybody who has maybe gone through something similar I’m all ears.

 

Evan

 

Hi, Evan.

 

As you can see further up this thread, IrishMonkey and I have discussed this quite a bit (as have others) and you are not alone.  Your story is very, very similar to mine.  I was triggered by something 30 years ago that caused the dizziness onset and after numerous tests and visits I was given a low dose of tranquilizer and ultimately an SSRI.  I had some minor dizzy breakthroughs but didn't have a major recurrence until 25+ years later at which point I decided to wean off the meds and I have been doing so for the past 5+ years.  The dizziness (and I believe you and IM (and I) all have the same general feelings, sensations, etc. but describe it somewhat differently because it is so subjective) returned over time and I am at a point now where it is with me most (if not all) of the time.  It waxes and wanes but never really goes fully away.  

 

If you look at anxiety websites (e.g. www.anxietycentre.com) you will see a lot of discussion of this very sensation as being evidence of a hyperstimulated nervous system and the only "cure" is to calm the system and try to avoid overreacting to the sensations.  That, of course, is a hell of a lot easier to say than do when it involves your general sense of balance.  

 

You might find this interesting for example:

 

 

See if this seems familiar and we can all discuss further.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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IrishMonkey92

Mine doesn’t correlate to head movements. But mine is generally the same as apace’s. 

 

I also rarely feel unsteady or ‘off balance’. Because my balance is perfect, it’s just the sensation of rocking on a boat. 

 

Mine is exactly like this guys. I’ve even made a video about mine when I got rid of it for 3 weeks but I was doing multiple things and I’ve no idea which worked. 

 

 

 

this is mine 

 

 

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Bonzee
12 hours ago, apace41 said:

 

 

I watched several of the posted vlogger's videos and I agree with most of what she said, but I have it somewhat to a lesser degree. She seemed a pretty severe case, but I feel mostly the same symptoms. I have been recently having some autonomic problems as well...probably due to the anxiety. My legs (especially my right leg) feel like they are vibrating when I lay down for bed. I don't have to move them, but I feel the vibration. Also, my heart races when I get up from sleep, seems to be some autonomic problems creeping up along with the dizziness.

 

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apace41
9 minutes ago, Bonzee said:

She seemed a pretty severe case, but I feel mostly the same symptoms

 

I think that's right but I feel pretty much like I'm in that "boat" right now.  The point was not to compare you to her but to let you know that people who are dealing with anxiety can have that symptom without any impact from meds.  I think that taking and withdrawing from the meds can stimulate our CNS is a way that creates this dizziness symptom (especially when you are prone to it).

 

Just wanted you to see that you are not alone.

 

Best,

 

Andy

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Bonzee

Thanks for posting her videos, I subscribed to her. She seems very informative. 🙂

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