Jump to content
luv2knit

Zoloft Shortage

Recommended Posts

luv2knit

I don't know if this is the appropriate place to post this, but feel the word needs to get out.

 

I have heard some from Australia say they are not able to get Zoloft at this time in Australia. The buzz on the Zoloft FB page is that this is a GLOBAL shortage, and will continue until January of next year. It seems to be pretty widely known on there, but I don't recall seeing anyone on here mentioning it.

 

I know many of us are very sensitive to changes, so I thought it might be important to get the word out. As far as I know, this is the name brand, but I have had one person tell me there were issues with a particular strength of a particular generic as well.

 

If this is not appropriate, please delete. If it needs to be moved to another topic, this is fine too. Not trying to be an alarmist, but I feel this is legitimate, and am trying to give anyone tapering off of Zoloft fair warning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Altostrata

There is a shortage of Pfizer Zoloft in Australia. I haven't seen a shortage reported anywhere else.

 

Generics are still available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
luv2knit

Ok, Alto, thank you. Initially I heard Australia as well, but then a couple of weeks later, the buzz on two different Zoloft FB pages was that this was a global shortage... (with the emphasis on global). Apparently this was just misinformation. Just wanted to make sure nobody was caught unaware.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
InvisibleUnless

whats this about (why is there a shortage if they manufacture so much of it all the time)?  and does the government stockpile any of these for emergency rationing or experimental protocols (like pushing soldiers to the superhuman during wartime operations, eg fighter pilots on meth)?

 

i read in a 2012 article that many of the past psych med shortages were about political and economic posturing, as opposed to physical demand outpacing production.  perhaps there are deals/compromises awaiting closure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Iamfine

From my experience with Zoloft a shortage would be a good thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
luv2knit

There is definitely something strange going on. A shortage is NOT a good thing if it forces someone into cold turkey, or forces someone who is tapering and very sensitive to go to a generic. It doesn't affect me, because I've been there, done that--that's why I'm here!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
luv2knit

I have tried to look into this, and here's what I'm finding.

 

The people on the boards who are talking about this are all in Australia--BUT--at least one has been told by Pfizer that it is a GLOBAL shortage (until 2016), and several have been told by chemists that it is the active ingredient that is not available, and that soon the generics will not be available either. One person said she has spoken to friends in several U.S. states and Canada who were aware of the problem as well.

 

I'm not claiming to know anything for certain. I would suggest if you are on any version of Zoloft or Sertraline that you attempt to keep up with what is (or may be) happening.

 

Not knowing about withdrawal, I went off much too fast, because 11 months ago, I was told by my pharmacy (out of the blue) that they had to have a "pre-approval authorization" from my insurance company. (This after taking it for 20 years.) I knew this would not be quick and easy (it wasn't) plus I was afraid it meant I was soon not going to be able to get my refills. I got the authorization, good for a year--but now this. I don't pretend to know what's going on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
luv2knit

FWIW, those in Australia who are affected say their doctors don't know about it--just apparently the pharmacists, chemists, and Pfizer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
InvisibleUnless

this (and i know nothing of aussie news sites with regards to legitimacy, but mentions are a bit scant) claims "A spokeswoman for the TGA [Therapeutic Goods Association] told news.com.au the shortage was due to a manufacturing problem with Pfizer" but then a few sentences later, "A spokesman from Pfizer Australia told news.com.au the interruption was due to a shortage of the active ingredient [sertraline] from the Pfizer supplier globally."  the article, like most online news, had obvious and demoralizing typographical errors...but i guess news is not a particularly reliable source for anything regardless.

 

this journal has some interesting investigations into the synthesis of sertraline (as these drugs, like most chemicals, can be made many different ways---and differences in manufacture often account for some of the generic versions ability to be cheaper, but also differently effective, ie wellbutrin).  here are some patents regarding currently enacted methods.  and to finish a thought: differences in inactive ingredients and variable alterations in the amount of the active ingredient that dont legally require disclosure (due to being within a particular, and certain to be exploited, threshold) can also impact the effectiveness or side effect/tolerance profiles of medications like zoloft.

 

there are other weird complications that may or may not have a role in the situation...like pfizer preemptively launching its own generic zoloft (via subsidiary 'greenstone') before the patent expired to try to recoup some business ahead of competitors ability to market theirs, and how there have been a lot of legal battles between corporations looking to move forward with zoloft generics.  i dont know the outcomes of all that, or the politics behind who makes what and how, but maybe theres a book out there btdt or someone has already ogled.  zoloft seems to be winning in court against claims of birth defects very recently...

 

anyway, we seem to have a few possibilities (and im sure theres more):

 

1. suppliers cocked stuff up somehow (a bad ingredient, or bad procedure) --- unlikely to cause a disruption on a massive scale

 

2. artificial shortage instigated by pfizer

2a. in order to generate increased interest in the value of using or practically investing in sertraline/zoloft --- to create additional demand or marketplace footholds, like government stockpiling, for instance

2b. in order to strongarm potential roadblocks, like regulatory agencies or distribution contractors --- attrition using economic losses and social/political pressure as a tool

2c. in order to reiterate the necessity of antidepressants by playing off withdrawal anecdotes as symptomatic increases in the face of lacking medication, or even to skewer less effective generic versions --- too risky to seem likely

 

3. artificial shortage instigated by the chemical manufacturing companies or suppliers

3a. in order to shore up consideration of/reliance upon generics --- perhaps a higher profit margin exists for them through the generics, and possibility #1 could be a good cover or even enacted excuse for their bargaining tactic

3b. general turf warfare --- standard jockeying tactics

 

4. genuine shortage, since each company/synthesizing method has a different rate of normal manufacture and demand/preference can conceivably shift between categories more quickly than certain providers can anticipate or meet

 

in my searching a bit to compile this, now that i had a short chance, i still figure this is just a matter of posturing towards greater profits.  my brains a bit fried so this is incomplete and possibly a bit of a swiss cheese typing job; i should work for an online news outlet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Altostrata

This is very, very strange.

 

Those who cannot get Pfizer Zoloft will either have to make do with a generic brand, if available, or switch to Prozac (fluoxetine).

 

This will cause a lot of problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dalsaan

My understanding is that it is the active ingredient that is in short supply. This impacts the availability of generics as well. If this is global, I don't know why there isn't more formal,recognition of it. Companies are required to report this stuff.

 

Nonetheless, if you are on Zoloft It's probably worthwhile seeing if you can access any remaining stocks now and coming here to think through/talking through a strategy to switch if necessary.

 

Dalsaan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NJJ

Hi everyone,

 

I have been caught up in this hole drama. As stated in the Australian forum I rang Pfizer Australia and they told me exactly those words "it's a global issue and they are having trouble sourcing the main ingredient". I was in a total panic because I've taken generic before and had a reaction. I managed to get a 6 month supply by calling around nation wide. One pharmacist told me they can't even get the generic brand. The online pharmacies had more stock than instore. I got some from a hospital chemist and delivered from cairns.

 

Don't know if its appropriate but I do know some places that have some boxes left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dalsaan

I think post the details of the places that still had stock NJJ

 

D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LoveandLight

This is worrying..I've also had trouble sourcing at times my original brand that I usually take - sertraline Aurobindo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NJJ

It is very worrying. I really want to start withdrawing but my nervous system is still no way near repaired to deal with any changes wether that be withdrawal or generic. If worse comes to worse I could take 1/2 generic with original brand in my daily dose.

 

Places I know that DONT have Pfizer zoloft

 

-Sydney NSW (all chemist warehouses)

-Sunshine and Gold Coast QLD (all chemist warehouses)

-Toowoomba hospital pharmacy

-all chemists in CBD Brisbane

 

Most of the pharmists I spoke to said to target the smaller chemists that may have old stock.

 

Places you can get it but have to be living there

 

Innisfail QLD only a few boxes

I accidently rang a western australian pharmacy in the grange that has eight boxes left. Won't deliver.

 

Also please don't take my word for it but one chemist said March 2016

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brisvegas

Okay this has definetly impacted on me, about 5 weeks ago I took my usual script for 100mg Zoloft to a chemist warehouse in Brisbane and was told that they do not have it in stock, it was a big shock as I have been on it for many years and have never once experienced this at any chemist before, ever. I was given the generic brand instead. I took the generic for 5 days and developed nasty tension headaches and felt depressed and tired/sleepy during the day. I took the generic brand back to the chemist and told them about the side affects and the pharmacist had one pfizer zoloft packet left which had been put aside for a customer who did not pick it up. I was really happy to get my hands on it. I got to thinking that in 30 days I may run into the same problem, and guess what? I did. I have called a lot of chemists and they are all out of zoloft stock, I happened to be on holidays in Cairns and was able to locate 3 packets in Innisfail which I got my hands on immedietly with a multiply script. I am now in Brisbane and have been told that there will be no Zoloft available until January, I'm not gonna buy that story, a medication which is relied upon by millions suddenly not being available? something strange about the situation, and aparently the generic might become in short supply as well, I'm stocking up and not taking any chances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ABS89

I'm from Brisbane too and am really struggling. I've been on 100mg Zoloft for about 4 years.  I know the pharmacies insist that the generic brands are exactly the same but I'm back to how I was when I was on NOTHING.  Feeling nauseous (possibly withdrawals), down, tired, can't sleep, body aches, really struggling to get to work.  I feel like my body isn't getting enough of the anti depressant or something.  I just wanted to see if anybody else experiences this on generic and it's not just me??  Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
InvisibleUnless

i dont have a statistical statement of incidence, but its observed that a meaningful number of people report brand name psych meds as sometimes being more or less effective than their generic versions---and even sometimes report different experiences between the respective generic options for their medication.  reports of negative reactions (not the withdrawal effects that accompany discontinuation) also vary from person to person for each medication option.

this can result from many things, like (but not limited to):

<< differences in how the companies manufacture the active ingredient (in this case sertraline)
there are many patented processes to creating these chemicals, and not all of them result in the same structural or interactive properties.

<< differences in the inactive ingredients
different 'filler' and 'binder' ingredients (or ratios of those ingredients), different 'lubricants', dyes and coloring agents, preservatives, flavoring agents, and other elements are allowed to vary between different drugs considered medically equivalent.
 
these can be mixed with the active ingredient to help shape its time release profile, compose the pill casing, coat the casing, or serve some other role like making visual distinction easier.  these differences in composition can potentially cause peoples reactions to vary between medication sources/brands due to things like allergic/intolerant reactions or other issues such as relative bioavailability (how easily your body can access and process the medication) in individuals that might have particular genetic or environmental systemic functioning that deviates meaningfully from the average.

<< differences in how the medications are put together overall
many of these types of medications are more like cooked dinners than prefabricated bookshelves: the processes used to manufacture, combine, and finalize the product in a consumable form may alter aspects of how patients may react to them.
 
<< the potential laxness involved in considering it equal
generics are required to have the same active ingredient as the original drug (which has been shown in their trials to be the factor producing the desired results), and a 'bioequivalent' (similarly absorbed form) of the active ingredient, but both of those things are measured through statistical correlation of similarity rather than a hardline requirement.  saying a generic drug is 'interchangeable' with its branded counterpart, which refers to its effectiveness and its time-pattern and degree of absorption, is a matter of averaging results and considering the potential meaningfulness of the differences inevitably found between the original the the generic.  so, even if they are regarded as clinically 'interchangeable', it does not prevent the potential differences that are tolerated as acceptable differences through this method of equating drugs (and drug forms) from affecting individuals who are more sensitive to the present discrepancies than the trial groups or generic equivalency groups were.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fresh

Welcome to the site ABS and Brisvegas.

There's further discussion of this is in the Australia room (in Relationships). Pop in and say hello when you get a chance.

 

Fresh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tristan

this is utterly ridiculous. I get the same response from every chemist and doctor saying that there is a problem with the manufacturing and that the generic is essentially the same. when i tell them that I am experiencing side effects from switching to the generic they look at me as if I'm having a laugh. I don't think I am imagining losing my vision and feeling dizzy all of the time.

 

I don't see how if they are essentially all the same, why can't they keep producing zoloft? It isn't like they are harvesting crops on mars. I really think this shortage will cause some people to commit suicide and there isn't any straight answer being given. The blood will be on their hands.

I live in Perth and basically everywhere I go they are out of stock of zoloft. I have decided to just go cold turkey as it seems after the withdrawal signs wear off, it will be better than living on the generic.

 

after switching to the generic from zoloft i have never felt more misereable and ready to die than ever and that says a lot from someone who believes that suicide is a last resort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tristan

I'm from Brisbane too and am really struggling. I've been on 100mg Zoloft for about 4 years.  I know the pharmacies insist that the generic brands are exactly the same but I'm back to how I was when I was on NOTHING.  Feeling nauseous (possibly withdrawals), down, tired, can't sleep, body aches, really struggling to get to work.  I feel like my body isn't getting enough of the anti depressant or something.  I just wanted to see if anybody else experiences this on generic and it's not just me??  Thanks.

 

It's not just you. I feel exactly the same. The feeling i get on the generic is horrible compared to the zoloft. the worst part of it was the dizziness and insomnia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Max28564

Having been given a generic brand a month ago, Just before going on holiday to the UK, I didn't worry too much, just thought they had run out and it would be the same, during that trip I couldn't sleep, had minor panic attack on flight returning home, my husband thought I had changed, in which I thought it was in my head, that the drug was causing the change, went to the chemist today, and told no more till 2016, I thought that wasn't possible but now I'm worried.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dalsaan

this is utterly ridiculous. I get the same response from every chemist and doctor saying that there is a problem with the manufacturing and that the generic is essentially the same. when i tell them that I am experiencing side effects from switching to the generic they look at me as if I'm having a laugh. I don't think I am imagining losing my vision and feeling dizzy all of the time.

I don't see how if they are essentially all the same, why can't they keep producing zoloft? It isn't like they are harvesting crops on mars. I really think this shortage will cause some people to commit suicide and there isn't any straight answer being given. The blood will be on their hands.

I live in Perth and basically everywhere I go they are out of stock of zoloft. I have decided to just go cold turkey as it seems after the withdrawal signs wear off, it will be better than living on the generic.

after switching to the generic from zoloft i have never felt more misereable and ready to die than ever and that says a lot from someone who believes that suicide is a last resort.

Hi Tristan

 

Can I ask you to start a thread for yourself in the introductions forum and tell us a little about yourself, your drug history etc. can I also encourage you to rethink going cold turkey. Things can get worse. Which brand of generic are you on?

 

Dalsaan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brisvegas

The Australian Government - Department of Health website currently states Expected supply: 31 Jan 2016 for Pfizer Zoloft 50mg and 100mg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Altostrata

In switching from brand-name Zoloft to generic sertraline, you may wish to take your dose as 1/2 Zoloft and 1/2 generic. Split the tablets or make a liquid if necessary.

 

For those who are sensitive to brand changes, this can ease the transition from one brand to another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
btdt

i dont have a statistical statement of incidence, but its observed that a meaningful number of people report brand name psych meds as sometimes being more or less effective than their generic versions---and even sometimes report different experiences between the respective generic options for their medication.  reports of negative reactions (not the withdrawal effects that accompany discontinuation) also vary from person to person for each medication option.

 

this can result from many things, like (but not limited to):

 

<< differences in how the companies manufacture the active ingredient (in this case sertraline)

there are many patented processes to creating these chemicals, and not all of them result in the same structural or interactive properties.

 

<< differences in the inactive ingredients

different 'filler' and 'binder' ingredients (or ratios of those ingredients), different 'lubricants', dyes and coloring agents, preservatives, flavoring agents, and other elements are allowed to vary between different drugs considered medically equivalent.

 

these can be mixed with the active ingredient to help shape its time release profile, compose the pill casing, coat the casing, or serve some other role like making visual distinction easier.  these differences in composition can potentially cause peoples reactions to vary between medication sources/brands due to things like allergic/intolerant reactions or other issues such as relative bioavailability (how easily your body can access and process the medication) in individuals that might have particular genetic or environmental systemic functioning that deviates meaningfully from the average.

 

<< differences in how the medications are put together overall

many of these types of medications are more like cooked dinners than prefabricated bookshelves: the processes used to manufacture, combine, and finalize the product in a consumable form may alter aspects of how patients may react to them.

 

<< the potential laxness involved in considering it equal

generics are required to have the same active ingredient as the original drug (which has been shown in their trials to be the factor producing the desired results), and a 'bioequivalent' (similarly absorbed form) of the active ingredient, but both of those things are measured through statistical correlation of similarity rather than a hardline requirement.  saying a generic drug is 'interchangeable' with its branded counterpart, which refers to its effectiveness and its time-pattern and degree of absorption, is a matter of averaging results and considering the potential meaningfulness of the differences inevitably found between the original the the generic.  so, even if they are regarded as clinically 'interchangeable', it does not prevent the potential differences that are tolerated as acceptable differences through this method of equating drugs (and drug forms) from affecting individuals who are more sensitive to the present discrepancies than the trial groups or generic equiva

lency groups were.

 

 

Oddly enough the pharmacist switched me to generic without a word... I had a melt down.. only luck on my part caught the drug the actual capsule was almost exact to the effexor brand name... as soon as i clued in I was having a drug reactions I paid for brand name as I could not chance another melt down.. believe me I was bad enough without switching drugs... they were not the same inside my body I could not tolerate generic effexor. 

 

Since the FDA is seemingly ... according to this author falling down on the job of generic drug trial regulating... maybe that is part of the reason... give it a read.

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2015/02/fda_inspections_fraud_fabrication_and_scientific_misconduct_are_hidden_from.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ang

I still believe in my heart, the problem is even though it looks like pfizer are winning in the baby birth defects cases, it is only a matter of time, till they are proven.  I believe they are pulling a nsty drug out of circulation as soon as they can.             Taken 20 years to get them to court, remember all these people are poor, having to look and care for ill children.............    if the lawyers think they have a chance at winning eventually. they take it to court.  Just a matter of time, till the pfizer/zoloft empire crumbles....

 

ie they will be swearing under oath that their drug is safe, while knowing full well it is anything but safe.    I hope effexor is the next one.........to  go....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
btdt

 

i dont have a statistical statement of incidence, but its observed that a meaningful number of people report brand name psych meds as sometimes being more or less effective than their generic versions---and even sometimes report different experiences between the respective generic options for their medication.  reports of negative reactions (not the withdrawal effects that accompany discontinuation) also vary from person to person for each medication option.

 

this can result from many things, like (but not limited to):

 

<< differences in how the companies manufacture the active ingredient (in this case sertraline)

there are many patented processes to creating these chemicals, and not all of them result in the same structural or interactive properties.

 

<< differences in the inactive ingredients

different 'filler' and 'binder' ingredients (or ratios of those ingredients), different 'lubricants', dyes and coloring agents, preservatives, flavoring agents, and other elements are allowed to vary between different drugs considered medically equivalent.

 

these can be mixed with the active ingredient to help shape its time release profile, compose the pill casing, coat the casing, or serve some other role like making visual distinction easier.  these differences in composition can potentially cause peoples reactions to vary between medication sources/brands due to things like allergic/intolerant reactions or other issues such as relative bioavailability (how easily your body can access and process the medication) in individuals that might have particular genetic or environmental systemic functioning that deviates meaningfully from the average.

 

<< differences in how the medications are put together overall

many of these types of medications are more like cooked dinners than prefabricated bookshelves: the processes used to manufacture, combine, and finalize the product in a consumable form may alter aspects of how patients may react to them.

 

<< the potential laxness involved in considering it equal

generics are required to have the same active ingredient as the original drug (which has been shown in their trials to be the factor producing the desired results), and a 'bioequivalent' (similarly absorbed form) of the active ingredient, but both of those things are measured through statistical correlation of similarity rather than a hardline requirement.  saying a generic drug is 'interchangeable' with its branded counterpart, which refers to its effectiveness and its time-pattern and degree of absorption, is a matter of averaging results and considering the potential meaningfulness of the differences inevitably found between the original the the generic.  so, even if they are regarded as clinically 'interchangeable', it does not prevent the potential differences that are tolerated as acceptable differences through this method of equating drugs (and drug forms) from affecting individuals who are more sensitive to the present discrepancies than the trial groups or generic equiva

lency groups were.

 

 

Oddly enough the pharmacist switched me to generic without a word... I had a melt down.. only luck on my part caught the drug the actual capsule was almost exact to the effexor brand name... as soon as i clued in I was having a drug reactions I paid for brand name as I could not chance another melt down.. believe me I was bad enough without switching drugs... they were not the same inside my body I could not tolerate generic effexor. 

 

Since the FDA is seemingly ... according to this author falling down on the job of generic drug trial regulating... maybe that is part of the reason... give it a read.

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2015/02/fda_inspections_fraud_fabrication_and_scientific_misconduct_are_hidden_from.html

 

I went back and looked at that link 

please read it

Agents of the Food and Drug Administration know better than anyone else just how bad scientific misbehavior can get. Reading the FDA’s inspection files feels almost like watching a highlights reel from a Scientists Gone Wildvideo. It’s a seemingly endless stream of lurid vignettes—each of which catches a medical researcher in an unguarded moment, succumbing to the temptation to do things he knows he really shouldn’t be doing. Faked X-ray reportsForged retinal scansPhony lab testsSecretly amputated limbs. All done in the name of science when researchers thought that nobody was watching.

That misconduct happens isn’t shocking. What is: When the FDA finds scientific fraud or misconduct, the agency doesn’t notify the public, the medical establishment, or even the scientific community that the results of a medical experiment are not to be trusted. On the contrary. For more than a decade, the FDA has shown a pattern of burying the details of misconduct. As a result, nobody ever finds out which data is bogus, which experiments are tainted, and which drugs might be on the market under false pretenses. The FDA has repeatedly hidden evidence of scientific fraud not just from the public, but also from its most trusted scientific advisers, even as they were deciding whether or not a new drug should be allowed on the market. Even a congressional panel investigating a case of fraud regarding a dangerous drug couldn't get forthright answers

this is just a teaser much more to read

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
InvisibleUnless

here is a news article that was called to my attention and is possibly pertinent to the nature of the zoloft shortage, as reported on a new zealand newsite.

 

excerpts:

 

an agreement still being negotiated as the news article was printed (july 2, 2015---today) is "demanding increased protections for pharmaceutical companies, restricting access to the lower-cost generic versions of drugs that agencies such as New Zealand's Pharmac buy"....seeking to "prevent regulators in TPP countries [New Zealand, Australia, the United States, Canada, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, Vietnam, Chile, Peru, and Mexico] approving generic versions of drugs whenever there were unresolved patent issues".

 

my theory about political and corporate infighting may be spot on.  these, to my understanding, are the same regulations already seen in the US, and other countries have avoided adopting them to varying extents due to the essentially anti-international nature of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brisvegas

So today I purchased 3 x packets of Setrona generic Zoloft from Terry White Chemists, the Pharmacist said it was a good brand and should work well, I think its made in Canada. I'm only stocking up incase there is a shortage of generics as well, so I have a 6 month supply at hand just in case. Anyway my question is; has anyone tried this generic brand before? if yes, was it beneficial?
Regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
peggy

So today I purchased 3 x packets of Setrona generic Zoloft from Terry White Chemists, the Pharmacist said it was  a good brand and should work well, I think its made in Canada. I'm only stocking up incase there is a shortage of generics as well, so I have a 6 month supply at hand just in case. Anyway my question is; has anyone tried this generic brand before? if yes, was it beneficial?

Regards

Alto made a good suggestion a few posts up - consider taking half generic and half brand name to extend your brand name for as long as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ABS89

Yep I've been on the generic Terry White brand. I really struggled on it until I went to my doctor and he suggested altering my dosage because of the bio equivalency. So far so good I think. I got out of bed this morning lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brisvegas

Yep I've been on the generic Terry White brand. I really struggled on it until I went to my doctor and he suggested altering my dosage because of the bio equivalency. So far so good I think. I got out of bed this morning lol.

Was it 'Setrona'? Think Terry White has 2 generic brands. how much you on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ABS89

 

Yep I've been on the generic Terry White brand. I really struggled on it until I went to my doctor and he suggested altering my dosage because of the bio equivalency. So far so good I think. I got out of bed this morning lol.

Was it 'Setrona'? Think Terry White has 2 generic brands. how much you on?

 

Umm no not Setrona, I think just Sertraline?  I'm on 150mg but I'm still not having any improvement...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wombat

We are in Brisbane too, and have been waiting for the stock to arrive in , Originally we were told there was a problem with the manufacturing plant and the expected stock arrival date was mid July 2015, I spoke to them yesterday and the Chemists have received a letter saying that due to the company being unable to get the ingredients that the expected date is now January 2016. My husband tried a generic- Apo-Sertraline, with terrible results, he felt like he had taken no tablets for days. Looks like another trip back to the doctor to try yet another medication.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ABS89

Hi Wombat,

Yeah I called Pfizer about two weeks ago and they told me January as well :( I think I will have to try something different too. I'm just hesitant to start back at square one again. But if the sertraline isn't working I guess it can't be much worse. It's really put my body out of whack!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.